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Tips for a slipping bow?


outofnames
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In the winter my hands get quite dry.  Add in cold weather and I find that my bow tends to slip in my fingers.

If I run them under hot water to warm them up, I get a better grip as my fingers swell just enough on response to the heat.

But this isn't a great solution. 

Is there any, I don't know, tacky stuff people have dabbed on their bow to keep it in place without having to keep such a tight grip?

Keep in mind...only a bit over 3 years playing so not a ton of experience. 

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For starters, if you have access to blue ( sometimes known as "painter's" and originally manufactured by 3M? ) tape, try cutting a shorrt length in half and applying it on the stick and possibly a bit on the opposite side of the frog. The texture of the tape might add a bit of adhesion for the fingers.

Winter is often a time for dry hands. Also, the current use of hand sterilizers makes it difficult to develop normal adhesion that the finger tips are used to...

There are many more solutions, but this is an inexpensive, mostly reversible, solution. As a bit of dirt develops on that tape, the adhesion gets better. Sounds weird, but that's how it works.

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If you’re using a tight grip on your bow, I think that issue is with the bow hold. The bow should be held delicately, so much so that one could easily pluck the bow out of the player’s hand.

The bow is held primarily between the thumb and middle finger, and the other fingers rest on the bow to provide extra stability and weight. A simple exercise to position your fingers is to begin by making a circle with that thumb and middle finger. The frog fits into that circle between the thumb and middle finger. Then the other fingers can drop into place. Another good exercise is to practice holding the bow only with the thumb and middle finger. This builds up a sense of stability and helps one to appreciate the stabilizing effect of the other fingers. 

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1 hour ago, The Violin Beautiful said:

If you’re using a tight grip on your bow, I think that issue is with the bow hold. The bow should be held delicately, so much so that one could easily pluck the bow out of the player’s hand.

The bow is held primarily between the thumb and middle finger, and the other fingers rest on the bow to provide extra stability and weight. A simple exercise to position your fingers is to begin by making a circle with that thumb and middle finger. The frog fits into that circle between the thumb and middle finger. Then the other fingers can drop into place. Another good exercise is to practice holding the bow only with the thumb and middle finger. This builds up a sense of stability and helps one to appreciate the stabilizing effect of the other fingers. 

My teacher believes my bow hold is fine.

It's worth reiterating that this problem only arises in winter and just after, when my hands are driest.  When warm weather returns and into Fall, no problem.

The issue is the bow twists in my fingers due to insufficient friction and lack of natural grippiness from my overly dry skin.  

This problem repeats every winter, gone in late Spring.

I don't think it's a bow hold issue.  The same problem arises in my left hand, my fingers slide too easily on the fingerboard creating a lack of stable contact.  When my dry skin heals, the problem goes away.

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6 hours ago, outofnames said:

The issue is the bow twists in my fingers due to insufficient friction and lack of natural grippiness from my overly dry skin.  

Have you tried a good moisturizing cream applied regularly? (Not just before you play, of course)

You might consider discussing with a dermatologist. 

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On 3/24/2020 at 12:31 AM, outofnames said:

insufficient friction and lack of natural grippiness from my overly dry skin

I have the same issue in winter, and found that the tiniest amount of rosin dust is helpful.  Just rub the edge of your rosin block a little bit.  This was a tip from another MN member and it I found it worked for me...

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5 hours ago, Violadamore said:

Perhaps replace the goatskin/lizardskin and wire or whatever with a long wrap of rayskin or sharkskin?  :)

Because in similar fashion to traditional Nihonto, you want a surface that provides adequate grip, when your hands are covered in blood from a duel, so yeah, exactly like a violin solo...

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18 minutes ago, Fossil Ledges said:

Because in similar fashion to traditional Nihonto, you want a surface that provides adequate grip, when your hands are covered in blood from a duel, so yeah, exactly like a violin solo...

Actually, the leather or woven silk ito performs that function, along with cushioning.  The same (rayskin) is permeated with lacquer and (with a full wrap, or with a wrap-and-a-half) acts both to reinforce the wooden tsuka core as well as to hold the tsukaito in place.  When you see same by itself, the function is more decorative than practical. 

The function here is to improve the grip, but the conditions are less demanding.  A violin bow only weighs 50-60 grams instead of a kilogram or so, and you're not swinging it so quickly that tip passes 400 knots and whistles, meaning that you're not fighting a considerable amount of centripetal force with the violin bow.  Rayskin alone should be sufficient.  :).

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1 minute ago, Violadamore said:

Actually, the leather or woven silk ito performs that function, along with cushioning.  The same (rayskin) is permeated with lacquer and (with a full wrap, or with a wrap-and-a-half) acts both to reinforce the wooden tsuka core as well as to hold the tsukaito in place.  When you see same by itself, the function is more decorative than practical. 

The function here is to improve the grip, but the conditions are less demanding.  A violin bow only weighs 50-60 grams instead of a kilogram or so, and you're not swinging it so quickly that tip passes 400 knots and whistles, meaning that you're not fighting a considerable amount of centripetal force with the violin bow.  Rayskin alone should be sufficient.  :).

Agreed...but depends on the solo!

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1 minute ago, Violadamore said:

Oh...right.  How often do yours attract incoming?  :huh:;):lol:

Not at all, O Siren One, I am but a mere fan and third rate luthier. I was always a fan of Nihonto, but was a fencer in the western tradition. And I am old, my last national level fencing was the 2003-4 USFA National Team, Men's Veterans Sabre Team. I placed 19th. Each team for the Olympics was 10 plus two alternates, so I did not get terribly close. I just have a psych appreciation for those things which require discipline and single pointed-ness of mind, the passionate attention as it were...

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Two of my 3 kids fenced (foil), for several years (to Jr. National level).  So many hours spent in the salle...my favourite word is "piste"...

I even took one set of classes...just so I "got it" better while I watched...

I think I still have my own practice foil stashed away...hmmm...maybe I should dust it off...the cats might find it entertaining...

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My two kids fenced when they were younger but didn't stick with it. Epee scholarships helped get me through an undergraduate education. Fencing scholarships weren't hard to get because there weren't that many fencers. I switched to sabre after I started coaching while I was working on my doctorate. There are so many analogies between fencing and music...and psychology for that matter.

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51 minutes ago, Violadamore said:

Oh...right.  Haven't had to dodge a longneck in years.  Are yours still attracting incoming?  :huh:;):lol:

We are far too sophisticated in the hinterlands to dodge said longnecks...and I'm too old. My cello solos are guaranteed to keep my rural neighbors at a safe rural distance!

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