Sign in to follow this  
Brad H

Plastic Waste From Suppliers

Recommended Posts

I finally contacted several wholesaler suppliers of tools and parts and asked them to refrain from packing items for my orders in plastic bags.      One supplier received my request last year and my orders are now wrapped in paper or not wrapped at all.    As a former environmental ed. field teacher of 6th graders ( Santa Cruz mountains), I still try to walk the talk and recycle as much as possible;  I don't like throwing things away, especially plastic bags, which are made of fossil fuels, and often end up in unintended locations.    

The thought occurred to me that others might, with a prompt,  ask the same from their suppliers.   

Then, there is the sad state of plastic recycling in general...sigh

Signed, He who wants to live in a world which sustains the earth.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You'd like to think everyone would have one of these. But I;m sure someone either killed this guy or bought out the patent

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 minutes ago, jezzupe said:

You'd like to think everyone would have one of these. But I;m sure someone either killed this guy or bought out the patent

You have to be real careful with schemes like that. He's dumping all kind of plastic (and other) garbage into his reactor. There are lots of different kinds of plastics with all different chemical compositions that would break down differently. You need to see  the energy balance between the amount of oil generated and the energy that it takes to run the process.

Reminds me a little of the Mr. Fusion reactor from "Back to the Future".

Image result for back to the future reactor

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 I'd be on board!  I was, before the virus hit, trying to go as green as I could, without being rabid about it.  I figure if we all did that, the resulting waste would be manageable (maybe).

But of course, everything is leaning towards being hyper-disposable at the moment, which is going to really slow down the wee bit of progress the world made when it started some meaningful awareness with the plastic straw ban.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

At my last job I had responsibilities beyond my workbench and I took advantage of the opportunity to make the shop as environmentally friendly as I could. I never placed orders, but accepted many shipments - most of the plastic film can be disposed of at a local grocery (seriously, it's a lot more than most people are aware of!)

 https://www.greensourcedfw.org/articles/variety-plastic-bags-accepted-grocery-store-recycling-bins

Styrofoam peanuts and other packing material I dropped off at a local UPS to be reused, and they were always grateful and never acted like I was a nuisance. Cardboard was broken down, but an acquaintance of mine (reached through social media) ended up grabbing a bunch of the plastic pallets for a gardening project. 

It took a little extra effort, but the only time I really questioned why I was doing it was when I dropped a box of the packing peanuts in the parking lot outside of UPS and had to chase them down as they were taken away by a breeze! 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, FiddleDoug said:

You have to be real careful with schemes like that. He's dumping all kind of plastic (and other) garbage into his reactor. There are lots of different kinds of plastics with all different chemical compositions that would break down differently. You need to see  the energy balance between the amount of oil generated and the energy that it takes to run the process.

Reminds me a little of the Mr. Fusion reactor from "Back to the Future".

Image result for back to the future reactor

Well I don't know if it works, but to me it's not really a thermodynamics do we get more out than we put in, as much as it is a way to "digest plastics" at home instead of throwing it away. Again who knows if its "real" or not and what the limitations are, but it's just that it would be nice to have such things, the oceans may be better off if we did, but who knows.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great idea Brad.  I never thought to ask for paper instead of the various plastic packaging.  I try to reuse any packaging I get.  Also, As some folks on MN that have received packages from me will attest, I often ship using wood shavings.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Most of what I am talking about are the prodigious number of plastic ziploc bags in which separate items are packaged; sometimes plastic bags are used to enclose other plastic bagged items.  As Jim pointed out, reusing them is advantageous but, at some point, they pile up and one is occasionally reminded of larger pictures to consider.

Those are some good ideas, Joel.   I, too, know the occasional hazards of recycling packaging peanuts; a cello-size box full of peanuts scoffed at my tie-down attempts in the back of my pickup and tried to make it to greener pastures on a rural road.    Of course, the box opened on impact with the curb of the road and I spent a long afternoon picking up peanuts in the ditch on the side of the road.

I appreciated the comments, Rue and those posting on waste-to-oil technology.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 I picked up several prescriptions yesterday, and I was struck again at the thought of how many countless millions of those stupid pill bottles are manufactured for used by Walmart and others, used once, and then sent off to the landfill. I can’t imagine it wouldn’t be easier and cheaper to put prescriptions in bags made of rice paper. Because most prescriptions are recurring, the customer could have their own receptacle at home,  transfer the pills from the rice paper bag to that receptacle, and then discard the bag. And maybe not even rice paper, I just say that because it’s very obviously both biodegradable, and very easily sustainable. So why isn’t it done? Remember my yesterday statement that governments are not proactive? Neither are businesses: they don't change unless they are forced to do so Because change is expensive.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, PhilipKT said:

 I picked up several prescriptions yesterday, and I was struck again at the thought of how many countless millions of those stupid pill bottles are manufactured for used by Walmart and others, used once, and then sent off to the landfill. I can’t imagine it wouldn’t be easier and cheaper to put prescriptions in bags made of rice paper. Because most prescriptions are recurring, the customer could have their own receptacle at home,  transfer the pills from the rice paper bag to that receptacle, and then discard the bag. And maybe not even rice paper, I just say that because it’s very obviously both biodegradable, and very easily sustainable...  businesses: they don't change unless they are forced to do so Because change is expensive.

Yes.

It's amazing how fast the pill bottles add up. I'd also like to see a change there. It shouldn't be that hard to implement.

Businesses might change if they were allowed to, but there are certain regulations they can't circumvent. I expect pill bottles = child safety concerns.

But again, I'm also pretty sure someone could make sturdy, (pretty), reusable pill containers, with a label holder (for medication name and directions), that could be filled at the pharmacy (the pharmacy can still get the order ready using a biodegradable package).

Does it, once again, have to be a result of mass consumer pressure? Like banning straws?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think what Brad and others are doing is very important. We need to have a choice when it comes to packaging. Perhaps it's up to the consumer to direct the supplier. 

We need to save the planet from ourselves for ourselves.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/24/2020 at 1:12 PM, Brad H said:

I finally contacted several wholesaler suppliers of tools and parts and asked them to refrain from packing items for my orders in plastic bags.      One supplier received my request last year and my orders are now wrapped in paper or not wrapped at all.    As a former environmental ed. field teacher of 6th graders ( Santa Cruz mountains), I still try to walk the talk and recycle as much as possible;  I don't like throwing things away, especially plastic bags, which are made of fossil fuels, and often end up in unintended locations.    

The thought occurred to me that others might, with a prompt,  ask the same from their suppliers.   

Then, there is the sad state of plastic recycling in general...sigh

Signed, He who wants to live in a world which sustains the earth.

Brad,

You certainly have the right approach. Instead of having to worry about how to dispose of plastic, try to eliminate it at the point of purchase. Living in New Zealand has been an eye-opener for me. The folks here are very aware of the importance of cutting down on plastics. You bring your own bags to the grocery store. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.