Sign in to follow this  
David Beard

The old Cremona plagues, who died?

Recommended Posts

Some news re Lombardy --

We live in New England, but my wife grew up in Milano and all her family's over there. Her sister reports that there are no shortages in the supermarkets, but the bookstores have sold out all copies of Manzoni's I promessi sposi . That's this big heavy 19th novel everybody used to have to read in high school, set in the plague years that killed off the Brescian school. Marisa says everybody is re-reading it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, David Beard said:

So the true bones of the myth are no more than N became head of his house, and his main Brescian competition died?

 

I don't know if you could call it a myth, but one way to think of it was that until the 1630 ish era, the Amati shop was a family business for three generations, and sons and grandson were enough to fill orders. After the 1630's, Nicola was alone and had to start taking in assistants from outside the family, so Guarneri, Rogeri and a host of others start working for him. Maybe that would have happenned anyway, as demand for violins grew, but reading or re-reading the exchange of letters between Galileo and Father Micanzio about getting a first-class violin for Galileo's nephew gives some interesting insights into ordering a violin in the mid 17th century: 

Firstly, in the mind of a cultured person who was not a professional musician, the best violins came from either Cremona or Brescia. That a good up and coming violinist could make his way into a good "orchestra" job with something other than a Cremonese or Brescian violin, so there were other makers out there that history has "forgotten." (Mariani, for instance?) That at that time (1638) for a professional musician like Monteverdi, (who was Micanzio's musical contact in Venice) Cremonese violins were far superior to Brescian violins and sold for more than double the price. That it took time to finish a commission, notably because Amati needed a solid week of sunny weather to dry the varnish enough to ship the violin (at least that was his excuse). That an older Amati sold for more than a new commission.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 hours ago, David Burgess said:

You doin' alright, Bruce? No confirmed cases in Michigan yet. That's one of the advantages of living in bumf***k. :lol:

Hi David,

I'm fine but they have advised everyone to stay home and avoid contacts in an attempt to slow down the spread of the virus (this is what the Chinese did and it appears to work). The big problem is if the virus continues to spread exponentially there will not be enough intensive care units for the 8 to 10 percent that will need help to get through the respiratory crisis tied to the ability of the virus to interrupt oxygen flow between the lungs and the circulatory system, and of course the release of CO2. This is the percentage that have to be put on a respirator. It appears to be more dangerous for people over 65 years.

I have to say I wouldn't mind being back in Michigan but without a house there anymore it doesn't make a lot of sense.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, David Beard said:

Ok. Not myth. 

But it feels like this story is often presented as if it sort of explains the ascendance and importance of N. Amati.    

I kinda think N Amati and Cremona might easily have shaped up very much as they did anyway.

 

What if Gerolamo Amati had survived or if Maggini had survived? Nicola Amati was fortunate to have the skills and the wherewithal to develop violinmaking in Cremona by taking it outside of the family. He really had no competition to speak of.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Update on the Corona virus.

My neighbor across the street where I live just died from complications caused by the Corona virus. It's no joke and it's highly contagious. Everyone has been advised to stay in their home and only go out when absolutely necessary. Some of the grocery stores have a service now where you can call in your order and they deliver to your door, or should I say near to your door. The whole thing is very unsettling.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
43 minutes ago, Rue said:

:(

That makes it so much more "real", doesn't it?

When we see Italian doctors talking about it, when we see the hospitals, etc, it is very very real. The press is fueled by press releases from the big companies, they don't want us stopping buying things, traveling, etc.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bruce is easy to love. Same goes for Davide Sora. I wish the best for both of them. and for many more in Italy who I have spent a bit of time hanging out with.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
44 minutes ago, David Burgess said:

Bruce is easy to love. Same goes for Davide Sora. I wish the best for both of them. and for many more in Italy who I have spent a bit of time hanging out with.

It is an international pandemic. Although we sympathise with our Italian colleagues of course, it is mistaken to be smug, and think it is only them. My niece & her husband visited me today, on holiday from Scotland. I had a whole list of places I wanted to take them, but absolutely everything was closed. All museums, concerts, even the church are shut,  football games are being played behind closed doors etc. About all one can do is to sit in the sun with an ice cream or a coffee. My sons day centre asked me if I would be able to take him from next week, since they expect to get shut down too. You can stay in your workshop as well, since there is nothing to do outside.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks like the Paris Conservatory will be shut down starting Monday. At least I'll be able to get ahead with the viola I started. Maybe I can start that plaster cast of a worthless French Maggini copy that needs a post patch...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, jacobsaunders said:

It is an international pandemic. Although we sympathise with our Italian colleagues of course, it is mistaken to be smug, and think it is only them. My niece & her husband visited me today, on holiday from Scotland. I had a whole list of places I wanted to take them, but absolutely everything was closed. All museums, concerts, even the church are shut,  football games are being played behind closed doors etc. About all one can do is to sit in the sun with an ice cream or a coffee. My sons day centre asked me if I would be able to take him from next week, since they expect to get shut down too. You can stay in your workshop as well, since there is nothing to do outside.

Since niche fiddle makers have a natural tendency to self-isolate, imagine what the world will be like if they are the only survivors! :blink::lol:

Wood shavings everywhere. Wooden cars, computers and microchips made from wood.....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It was announced on the radio today that the Saturday live Met Opera broadcasts are cancelled for at least the rest of the month, because the Met is closing for a while.  :(

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hubby's office may shut down for 30 days.  Every one is to work from home. Universities are talking about remote classes...

...and we have no confirmed cases yet.

As pragmatic as we are, it's still hard to avoid being worried altogether when you hear, and see, the panic growing all around you...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Rue said:

Hubby's office may shut down for 30 days.  Every one is to work from home. Universities are talking about remote classes...

...and we have no confirmed cases yet.

As pragmatic as we are, it's still hard to avoid being worried altogether when you hear, and see, the panic growing all around you...

Yep. My Uni music program is shut down for the rest of the year :/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, David Burgess said:

Since niche fiddle makers have a natural tendency to self-isolate, imagine what the world will be like if they are the only survivors! :blink::lol:

Wood shavings everywhere. Wooden cars, computers and microchips made from wood.....

I've always wanted to make a Costin replica in my workshop...

Costin-Nathan-GT-5311.jpg

Costin-Nathan-GT-5309.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, David Burgess said:

Since niche fiddle makers have a natural tendency to self-isolate, imagine what the world will be like if they are the only survivors! :blink::lol:

Wood shavings everywhere. Wooden cars, computers and microchips made from wood.....

And don't forget The Wooden Wonder: 

:)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.