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arglebargle

Cello sound post patch rates

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On 3/7/2020 at 10:59 AM, Michael Darnton said:

 I really hope you aren't just pulling numbers out of your ass based on your stress level! Think about that for a minute---that means that people who work at the fringes of their skill, constantly on the edge of messing up and fearful, not sure in their skills, should get paid more!

A lot of times people who cannot to a job will give a high quote because they know it will be a problem for them.  And sometimes it's to warn you away.  Sometimes when it's all over and time to pay the high fee for the horrible job, they're eager to accept less...

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On 3/7/2020 at 1:12 PM, PhilipKT said:

 A colleague‘s stepson was looking at an engineering job in San Francisco that would’ve paid him almost $250,000 a year, and he’s making about 100 right now in North Texas. But when he researched the respective cost of living in the various places he found that the raise would only work out to about 20 grand. So he decided to stay here. 

Turned down a 20 grand raise? 

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4 hours ago, Bill Merkel said:

Turned down a 20 grand raise? 

Yes. Moving from texas would have involved a lot of unwelcome changes, so he preferred to remain here.

 

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17 minutes ago, PhilipKT said:

Yes. Moving from texas would have involved a lot of unwelcome changes, so he preferred to remain here.

 

Big challenge for me coming from PA. And chomping at the bit to get out.

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20 minutes ago, deans said:

Big challenge for me coming from PA. And chomping at the bit to get out.

Texas has advantages, but it’s getting awful crowded. Room around here for a good violin guy, though.

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4 hours ago, deans said:

Big challenge for me coming from PA. And chomping at the bit to get out.

i lived in san fran 20 yrs ago and loved it, though it was expensive, especially rent.  i lived in austin tx 10 yrs ago and it was a lot more boring, but still not bad.  prices there were like the rest of the country.  pretty low, surprisingly low sometimes.  what is san fran like now?  i've been considering going back out.  i keep reading it's like its own 3rd world country but don't know if it's hyped

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5 hours ago, PhilipKT said:

Yes. Moving from texas would have involved a lot of unwelcome changes, so he preferred to remain here.

 

he's traveling too heavy.  i'd take it and if i didn't want the raise i'd donate it to feed the natives

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OK explain this to me? I see several very straight cracks, Long, but clean. One of them trails off to the left a little bit which probably will be more complicated.You have to take the top off, of course, But It looks as if the wood would go back together pretty easily, and cleats are straight forward.what makes that an abnormally  problematic repair?

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38 minutes ago, Michael Darnton said:

Some people would not even put a post patch in that one.

I, being one of them....(edit)well, maybe on second thought.........................

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14 minutes ago, PhilipKT said:

OK explain this to me? I see several very straight cracks, Long, but clean. One of them trails off to the left a little bit which probably will be more complicated.You have to take the top off, of course, But It looks as if the wood would go back together pretty easily, and cleats are straight forward.what makes that an abnormally  problematic repair?

Not really problematic, just  super important that you retain the arching well.

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51 minutes ago, arglebargle said:

Alright, here's the damage.

 

... and... as I asked... is the maker living and active? That would be the first of several questions I'd have.

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48 minutes ago, Mark Norfleet said:

There are some interesting challenges with that kind of damage.  The post patch is the easy part.

Enjoy!

I agree with Mark.  Maybe others haven't blown up the photo?

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24 minutes ago, PhilipKT said:

 But It looks as if the wood would go back together pretty easily, and cleats are straight forward.what makes that an abnormally  problematic repair?

you do this sort of repair on a regular basis then?

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2 minutes ago, Jeffrey Holmes said:

... and... as I asked... is the maker living and active? That would be the first of several questions I'd have.

That would be my first question as well.  A new top by the maker, if possible, would probably be the best approach.  I’ve done that on an instrument I made and nudged others to do the same.

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Just to be clear:

I never said it was an "abnormally problematic" repair. However, it is certainly a major restoration that  requires a high level of skill to execute correctly.

The maker is alive and active, aware of the situation, and involved. Most likely not going to repair the damage. Perhaps a new top, perhaps a new instrument, maybe neither.

The original question was only about the rate of a sound post patch for damage like this, not a simple crack, and assuming that the owner insists on having the work done, regardless of cost. Not the case here, but assuming it was.

 

 

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22 minutes ago, Mark Norfleet said:

That would be my first question as well.  A new top by the maker, if possible, would probably be the best approach.  I’ve done that on an instrument I made and nudged others to do the same.

Seems arglebargle doesn't want to answer my question.  :-(

Yup... I've approached this kind of repair in the same way twice in the last 3 years with excellent results.  The original makers did a fine job.

Even if a very fine restoration job was accomplished (and there's nowhere to hide on that 'cello; missing wood near the f hole, compound cracks, cross grain cracks, new unblemished finish, etc), the damage would depreciate the instrument around (conservative ballpark) 20 to 25%.  Add the cost of restoration to that figure, and I'd bet the cost of a new top would be covered (and possibly then some). If the instrument is insured, and the maker active, I would argue a new top may well be the best cosmetic and fiduciary remedy.

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It is a big repair.  

If I'd made the cello,  I think I'd like to replace the top.  The devaluation of a damaged front, plus the cost of the repairs, would outweigh the cost of a front I think.

Edit. Didn't see JHs reply.

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