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Shot in the ribs...


notsodeepblue
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...a slightly odd one this, but does anyone have any insight into whether there are any potentially negative effects of lead shot on the material properties of Maple / English Sycamore? 

I ask partly because Maestronet is such a broad church I figure someone probably has this knowledge tucked away somewhere, but also because I bought a large amount of timber (for other purposes) assuming it to be knotty, only to find lead-shot peppered through the discoloured regions. 

Having not made anything in a while, I thought I would try a quick cornerless to see if I could tell if something was "off" while working it (it seemed OK) but I am now wondering if there are other issues I ought to consider before doing anything else?

Many thanks,

(picture follows, for the curious)

ShotInTheRibs.thumb.JPG.829489860ab963f6dad5c5aac50de5b0.JPG

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14 minutes ago, notsodeepblue said:

...a slightly odd one this, but does anyone have any insight into whether there are any potentially negative effects of lead shot on the material properties of Maple / English Sycamore? 

 

It looks like the wood wasn't very happy, and I would expect a serious reduction of strength in that area. However, I have no actual experience with this.

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9 minutes ago, David Burgess said:

It looks like the wood wasn't very happy, and I would expect a serious reduction of strength in that area.

Thanks - reassuring to hear I am not alone in being concerned, as this was my instinct as well. I will need to think a bit more carefully about if / how it can be used.

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I would not be concerned with lead poisoning.  Lead is toxic (depending on dose) through inhalation and ingestion, but not through dermal contact.  Sealed behind varnish it is safe.  In the unreasonable scenario that someone pops the bullet fragment out and swallows it, they would have lead exposure.  However, that person probably won't notice any decline in IQ from lead poisoning.  :)

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1 minute ago, notsodeepblue said:

Thanks - reassuring to hear I am not alone in being concerned, as this was my instinct as well. I will need to think a bit more carefully about if / how it can be used.

Do you have some cutoff pieces with that blemish, which you could use to experiment with the strength? (I'd probably do this by bending a thin piece to see where it breaks.)

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I think most musicians would be turned off by a lead  peppered violin and there is a good chance that it would have some negative effects on both sound and longevity of the instrument.

On the other hand I think there are other items where the look and history of this wood could be a definite asset. Gun stocks, furniture. jewelry boxes or  just about any wooden items other than violins or kitchenware would seem to be better uses for it. If you don't make those sort of things you could probably sell it at a premium price to people who do.

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4 hours ago, Jim Bress said:

I would not be concerned with lead poisoning.  Lead is toxic (depending on dose) through inhalation and ingestion, but not through dermal contact.  Sealed behind varnish it is safe.

 

3 hours ago, Rue said:

That bit of lead, as is, is harmless.

Thanks both - that's very reassuring to hear.

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4 hours ago, David Burgess said:

Do you have some cutoff pieces with that blemish, which you could use to experiment with the strength? (I'd probably do this by bending a thin piece to see where it breaks.)

Sounds like a great plan, and I have a couple of marked offcuts from the ribs left that I can test - thanks.

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1 hour ago, nathan slobodkin said:

I think most musicians would be turned off by a lead  peppered violin and there is a good chance that it would have some negative effects on both sound and longevity of the instrument.

On the other hand I think there are other items where the look and history of this wood could be a definite asset. Gun stocks, furniture. jewelry boxes or  just about any wooden items other than violins or kitchenware would seem to be better uses for it. If you don't make those sort of things you could probably sell it at a premium price to people who do.

Thanks for the numerous good ideas - I did actually buy the wood as rough stock intending to resaw around what I thought were knots, for use in a couple of my own bent-wood furniture projects. When I started to doubt that these blemishes were knots, I thought I'd make a quick test project to see if I could also work with the discoloured wood (...and made it approximately violin-shape, for my own amusement).

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1 hour ago, nathan slobodkin said:

I think most musicians would be turned off by a lead  peppered violin and there is a good chance that it would have some negative effects on both sound and longevity of the instrument.

...

Are those the same musicians who put rattlesnake rattles in their fiddles? :ph34r:

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I have several #6 shot pellets imbedded in my sinus cavity, from a "work place" incident [No I was not part of the GWB Whitehouse staff]... That have been there for almost forty years. So far I haven't gotten any stupider, I don't believe...?

The most fun about this is watching the eyebrows/facial expressions of staff at a new dentist's office after the first panoramic X-ray.

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Interesting thread and cool violin! Stray lead, iron and steel bits will also leave metal oxides in the surrounding wood fibers which can color it. I also have some lightning struck Hickory, enough to do two mantels, which I am trying to decide what to do with. I have only seen lightning struck wood a few times, but I'm still brainstorming about a functional/decorative neck for a bass.

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11 hours ago, nathan slobodkin said:

I think most musicians would be turned off by a lead  peppered violin and there is a good chance that it would have some negative effects on both sound and longevity of the instrument.

On the other hand I think there are other items where the look and history of this wood could be a definite asset. Gun stocks, furniture. jewelry boxes or  just about any wooden items other than violins or kitchenware would seem to be better uses for it. If you don't make those sort of things you could probably sell it at a premium price to people who do.

I wouldn’t be turned off at all by such a cello, I would actually think it’s kind of cool, and I would perpetually laugh at the lousy shot that missed his target and hit instead a perfectly good tree.

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11 minutes ago, PhilipKT said:

I wouldn’t be turned off at all by such a cello, I would actually think it’s kind of cool, and I would perpetually laugh at the lousy shot that missed his target and hit instead a perfectly good tree.

Might not have missed.  Ever hunted turkeys?  :)

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