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tango

Working with potassium dichromate.

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Thanks for linking a resource for the safety information.  That should supplement the practical usage info that others are generously providing. 

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I’ve been using diluted Potassium Parmanganate for color on the last few projects in conjunction with uv to good effect.  It seems to be the safer option but I wear gloves and use ventilation all the same.

Here’s an example of the effects on a couple of boxwood handles I turned yesterday..

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1 hour ago, DoorMouse said:

Thanks for linking a resource for the safety information.  That should supplement the practical usage info that others are generously providing. 

This was posted a few years ago and may be helpful. DM, your gouge handles look great.  

 

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30 minutes ago, DoorMouse said:

Here’s an example of the effects on a couple of boxwood handles I turned yesterday

...

Good work!

When you say "in conjunction with uv", may I ask if you think your approach would be best reserved for those using a uv-chamber, or if you think sunlight alone might provide enough uv (over a reasonable period)?

thanks,

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Re: dosage, my mother, who worked in a hospital lab and was sort of a medical hobbyist, taught me that too much water or too many peaches would kill you just as completely as anything else (if they represented 100% of your diet) and that common sense went farther than fear. Likewise my doctor, who when I asked about using arsenic colors said "You're not going to do anything stupid, right? Then no problem." That's the essence of chemical safety.

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56 minutes ago, notsodeepblue said:

Good work!

When you say "in conjunction with uv", may I ask if you think your approach would be best reserved for those using a uv-chamber, or if you think sunlight alone might provide enough uv (over a reasonable period)?

thanks,

The oxidation from potassium parmanganate is immediate and independent of the uv.  The uv helps even out the overall color and seems to bring it to a more stable state.  There is some amount of fading more towards grey and I think the uv may help this along.  I'm still experimenting at this time so don't take any of this as gospel. 

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52 minutes ago, Michael Darnton said:

I view UV as the quick way to achieve the state your job will get to eventually, so that your intent is able to stick in the future rather than change to something you never intended. Sunlight is OK. In our shop we use a couple of these:

https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B00W4SIY8Q

Oh cool, those are much cheaper than the bulbs I've been buying.

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19 hours ago, Michael Darnton said:

I view UV as the quick way to achieve the state your job will get to eventually, so that your intent is able to stick in the future rather than change to something you never intended. Sunlight is OK. In our shop we use a couple of these:

https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B00W4SIY8Q

I have one of these in the bottom of my UV cabinet to cure the bottom ribs evenly.

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On 2/29/2020 at 9:12 PM, Violadamore said:

I'd advise dissolving the dichromate in a small amount of water first, then mix the two solutions outside, down wind, and away from structures, until you know what it will do.   Shouldn't be a problem done with dilute solutions,, but the glue will oxidize, and adding the concentrated dry chemical to it could cause explosive splattering from rapid oxidation at the surface contact.  My major worry was that someone would innocently mix some +6 or +7 oxidizer with volatile varnish components and create a fireball.

Hi Viola D´amore. I beg your pardon for the delay of response. Just now I am opening Maestronet after very much days without opening this. Thank you very much for advised me, I apreciate a lot your comments.

I guess  you are one of the most important restorers in USA ¿Aren´t you? B)

I guess who you are but may be better to do not discover the secret. :D
Hoping you are well in this difficult days
Best regards
Tango

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1 hour ago, tango said:

I guess  you are one of the most important restorers in USA ¿Aren´t you? B)

I guess who you are but may be better to do not discover the secret. :D
Hoping you are well in this difficult days
Best regards
Tango

Important, no.  Just one of the noisiest.  :lol:  Here, so far, we are fine.  God bless you and yours in these challenging times.  :)

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" It seems to be the safer option but I wear gloves and use ventilation all the same. "

I'm a former chemist with 34 years experience, and have used Potassium Permanganate  many times. You can eliminate the need for ventilation- not a hazard.

If you're using a strong solution, gloves are a good idea to keep from staining you hands. Light skin contact is not a hazard.

https://www.healthline.com/health/potassium-permanganate-uses

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On 3/1/2020 at 11:48 AM, Michael Darnton said:

I view UV as the quick way to achieve the state your job will get to eventually, so that your intent is able to stick in the future rather than change to something you never intended. Sunlight is OK. In our shop we use a couple of these:

https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B00W4SIY8Q

Thirty-five years ago we used incandescent and fluorescent UV bulbs in the museum conservation labs for this same purpose. Today, the LED ones are much cheaper, energy efficient and operate cooler. I also currently use a small gear reduction motor to turn the instrument at one-third revolution per minute.

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Hi
I made my test with potassium dichromate and still am alive haha.
For some reason the darkening effect is little. I will apply a coat once more. May be I diluted a lot the potassium

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