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Classical Music is Reviving!!!


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4 hours ago, skelly said:

This is what happens when people of unlimited talent are willing to use it. Can anyone identify Hauser's cello and Susanne's fiddle?  

Not sure about Hauser, but Susanne was playing a del Gesu at that time (not sure if she still has it or not). She was one of the artists that had instruments on loan from Bein & Fushi. According to her bio, it was the 1735 Mary Portman, previously owned by Kreisler. 

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On 2/19/2020 at 12:16 AM, matesic said:

Always the cynic :angry:

I can only say (careful now, will only say) "I'm surprised". The survey was carried out for the RPO and reported by Classic FM, who have absolutely no axe to grind. They canvassed 2,019 adults (how selected, how canvassed? - a questionnaire on the back of a concert program?) who were able to inform them about the listening habits of "young people in the UK" (progeny of concert-goers?). Read on and we discover that the three quarters of British adults that "have a relationship with" orchestral music include ("are chiefly"?) those who play video games and watch TV and films.

You mean the Mario theme song doesn't count? Dr.Mikee' is putting together the "Bristol Music Festival" a hopeful fun event that will be showcasing to and for younger folks.

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4 hours ago, Rue said:

I agree with much said in the article, but the author sets up and demolishes a straw man while dodging the real issue, which is largely within the classical genre itself.  IMHO, a better pair of signs for the meme might be The Barber of Seville for the long line, and Wozzeck  for the other ticket window.  :ph34r: :lol:   

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4 hours ago, Violadamore said:

I agree with much said in the article, but the author sets up and demolishes a straw man,,,,,,

Obviously,,,,,,,,,, though he had to rummage hard for the straw, probably left over from a crop circle,,,

4 hours ago, Violadamore said:

 the real issue, which is largely within the classical genre itself. 

So, please share your view,,,

 

Did you read his "        "  from the "other" insulting meme?

A riot I tell you,,, "We are in Good hands"

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2 hours ago, Evan Smith said:

Obviously,,,,,,,,,, though he had to rummage hard for the straw, probably left over from a crop circle,,,

So, please share your view,,,

 

Did you read his "        "  from the "other" insulting meme?

A riot I tell you,,, "We are in Good hands"

IMHO, the real issues have to do with the differing natures of "popular" and "classical" music in terms of entry conditions for performers and composers, along with the differences in compensation, where the money comes from, and the the yardsticks applied by critics in the media.  Simply put, success in classical music today (and for about the last hundred and fifty years) is similar to academic and athletic success (a myriad rules, many unwritten, apply), while success in popular music is based entirely on sales.  For instance, one can be considered a successful academic classical composer within the profession and never sell a single item to the paying public, all your work being grant or donation subsidized.  For a scientist, this is often, understandably, the case because one's audience is usually comparatively tiny, no matter the public good it does.  For anyone comparing themselves with a Haydn or a Rossini, it feels like cheating.  One of the informal yardsticks applied to art (music is an "art", after all) is the ability to attract a paying audience.  Hence all the "sturm und dreck" over public taste being what it is. :)

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14 hours ago, Rue said:

I think that article really oversimplifies the issues and makes some tenuous claims. 

Ticket sales at many concert halls have dropped, but that doesn’t mean that type of music has lost its appeal. And I don’t believe that elitism is the root of the problem. It’s much more common to find cases where classical musicians and organizations have gone so far to try get people to come in that they have come off as desperate or out of touch. You aren’t cool if you try so hard that everyone can tell. Rockstars are admired because they don’t seem to care what anyone else wants and they come across as rugged individualists. 
Pop music has a wide exposure, but it’s not very difficult to pinpoint weaknesses in much of its composition or execution. Yes,  some of the greatest composers wrote quickly, but they wrote with such incredible insight that they could consistently put forth material that was full of nuance.

There are a host of other factors that lead to the current situation, enough that one could write a ponderous tome on the topic. It’s just a shame to see an article that misses the point by such a considerable amount. 

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8 hours ago, The Violin Beautiful said:

gone so far to try get people to come in that they have come off as desperate or out of touch

I agree with this. I'm very familiar with modern music and I think choosing Wozzeck is an extreme example. My attempts to listen to it generally ended in aural fatique. 12 tone music was an experiment that failed imho. I think a more realistic choice  would be Bartok's Concerto for Orchestra or Music for Strings, Percussion & Celeste.

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This whole topic is complex.  A few years ago, the orchestra I play in performed a very complicated contemporary piece involving such things as aleatoric techniques and non-standard sounds made by regular instruments.  It was very dissonant, atonal, and unmelodic.  We had a big and enthusiastic audience for that piece, with many young (pre-gray hair) people attending.  It is not easy to sort out what reasons why people listen to different types of music. 

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16 hours ago, Violadamore said:

IMHO, the real issues have to do with the differing natures of "popular" and "classical" music in terms of entry conditions for performers and composers, along with the differences in compensation, where the money comes from, and the the yardsticks applied by critics in the media.  Simply put, success in classical music today (and for about the last hundred and fifty years) is similar to academic and athletic success (a myriad rules, many unwritten, apply), while success in popular music is based entirely on sales.  For instance, one can be considered a successful academic classical composer within the profession and never sell a single item to the paying public, all your work being grant or donation subsidized.  For a scientist, this is often, understandably, the case because one's audience is usually comparatively tiny, no matter the public good it does.  For anyone comparing themselves with a Haydn or a Rossini, it feels like cheating.  One of the informal yardsticks applied to art (music is an "art", after all) is the ability to attract a paying audience.  Hence all the "sturm und dreck" over public taste being what it is. :)

OH!       THAT  ROAD!

Exactly!

Ah, the multitudes of talented beings doomed to toil away in some indiscript form of slavery in order to survive, self medicating to ease the pain of failure and loss, never finding that nich that their heart longs to find, all the while just wanting to belong and participate in society with the gifts they, and only they have to offer,,, never even understanding the what or the why,,,,,,,,,,till the day they die. They just live day by day,  the job,,, bills,,,kids,,,work,,,growing old, looking for distraction, being entertained by the very ones that the coin changers hand pick and  place before them to take their money and make themselves rich, feeding off of the herd, using others talents, for their gain and the cycle goes on and on. All the while many of the ones that are used for the bait to rake in the bucks are unhappy and faltering because acquiring  fame and fortune so rapidly is rather unnatural , they don't have time to mature into the success and few can really handle it well. Some do, many don't.

There are those that reach for their dreams for many reasons, but money often isn't one of them, it can't be,,, because there isn't any, It's just the right thing to do.

I am certainly grateful for the cream that has risen to the top in times past and we have it now to inspire us, I do LOVE the old Guys, Beethoven,,,etc, I believe  it is providence.

In this modern world though, it is possible to bypass the money changers and get it out there, but that is a separate talent all it's own, so it ends up we still need some form of help from others to be successful,,, as it should be. And many people do lots of things visibly today just because it's the right thing to do. The net is an example of giving many people an opportunity to actually do something for many others for free, and it is happening,,, very encouraging to see, But,,There is so much of it,,,, Wow! It's a big world,,,

I would not have even seen the meme as about the music as the central theme,,, but as an example of the instant self gratuitous nature of man, it takes a bit of time to listen to and under what's being said in a great piece of art, of any form,,, modern man doesn't generally have time for that. Instant breakfast, microwaves, faster internet, tits and butts everywhere you look, instant pleasure all the time. I heard about an unspoken rule in the pop music industry that the "Hook" needs to occur with in the first few seconds of a song to catch the attention of the listener before they scroll to the next choice, that explains one aversion I have to modern music, it's so in your face,, yes there is some great things still being produced, but.

I love lots of simple music of any kind, I completely fail to see any point he was making in either article, kind of like defending myself for the day I was born.

I thought the article was written by some defensive butt hurt southern Cal whiner who totally missed any point,,, he's in the UK at a fm station that even has a tab to hook up for dates with other listeners,, 50 to 60 yr olds,, now we're cook'in with gas! (It mean's we are modern)

Classical music will always be there, just like vanilla and chocolate ice cream.

 

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