Jump to content
Maestronet Forums

T Perry / German / Something Else?


Shelbow
 Share

Recommended Posts

4 hours ago, Conor Russell said:

That would  be  about 1813 or so. But I can't  really  see the number. 

In my experience these can be a bit of a disaster when you take the lid off and look inside.  We seem to have had many  inventive repairers over the  years,  and  some of their inventions weren't all that  good. 

So I'd be careful  not to invest too much enthusiasm in this old fiddle!

 

1813 !!!!   …..  must be a J B Schweitzer :lol:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Lots  of  the British  people  I know  are desperately  anxious to be Irish  at the moment! How things  change. 

I do see the Irish makers as being very  much of the British school. Dublin was one of the most important cities at the time, wealthy, and with a strong classical music tradition.  Things changed after the Act of Union in 1800, and although the musical life continued for a few more decades, the wealth dried up. Then in 1845 the famine decimated the country. 

I never heard any discussion of Perry having imported instruments, the Mittenwald one being an oddity. But occasionally a particularly  nice one crops up  and you wonder who made it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 hours ago, rudall said:

How is a violin made in Dublin in 1813 not British?
Andrew

Martin  beat me to it. And the craftsmen were very definitely working  in an irish style, because they were Irish. 

But If I'm not sure if a violin is Irish or not, I'll be wondering if it might be  English,  not French or German. 

Crafts and trades developed very local traditions in the past. Travel and communication have watered that down, but look how we can  distinguish between violins made in German villages just a few miles apart. 

Likewise my silversmithing teacher pointed out how different Irish and English work was. The Irish smiths took the fireskin off the entire  surface before polishing, giving the work a very different colour and texture.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In the 80s I met an elderly colleague who sounded British --- I thought.

Last name was Hassett. What do I know.

Foolishly I asked what part of England he was from. That did not go over very well. Mind you he was an active IRA supporter.

Things have changed though.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

33 minutes ago, hendrik said:

In the 80s I met an elderly colleague who sounded British --- I thought.

Last name was Hassett. What do I know.

Foolishly I asked what part of England he was from. That did not go over very well. Mind you he was an active IRA supporter.

...

Not violin related, but I was talking with a British acquaintance, who was listening to another woman in our group.

The British woman asked me where in England the other woman was from.

I replied, "Australia".

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.



×
×
  • Create New...