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xraymymind

Are there any good books/resources on Making Pegs

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Hello folks,

I have tried the search function for this, but I couldn't find any good threads on it.

I wonder if there are any good books out there, that detail how to turn ones own pegs. I would like to learn to do this, but have very little woodturning experience. Are there any specialist articles/chapters in violin making books, etc. detailing this process?

All the best.

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I don't think specifically it covers peg making, rather highly detailed intricate turning of small items.
It will show you the skills you would need to master, in order to turn nice pegs.

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I was a machinist for 40 years so when it came to making pegs I just made them.  I form the undercut after the collar by hand with a small gauge and files, and also use those to put some shape on the collar itself that is a separate piece.  The rest I do with the compound.  If you don't have a metal lathe, then it all has to be done by hand.  

Turning is pretty easy, but if you've never done it, make a few things first; especially if you are doing it by hand.  The little freehand parts I do are very fast, and are small,  I don't even use a tool rest; but that's me; you may want one.

I cut mine to shape out of flat stock.  Sometimes I have stock that is thick enough for two, and slice it in half. It doesn't have to be perfect.  I use an awl to poke a center in the small end, and put the head in my fixture I made, and turn the shaft straight.  I make it somewhat bigger than the biggest diameter of the peg.  Then I change the jaws on the lathe, chuck on the straight shaft, and turn the head to the shape I want. Then I flip it around again, and change the jaws back.

I have to shim the head some to make sure the shaft is straight enough.  Then I cut the taper on the peg.  I have my compound set up perfect.  After that I put the undercut in by hand.   I keep the area of the collar straight, not tapered.

Then I make collars.  I've used ebony, and this fake ivory.  It must be made from white glue.  That's what it smells like.  Sometimes it is chippy.  I have to bore a hole .001-.002" or so over the peg diameter.  It has to fit on.  Then I turn the design in with a tiny pointed gouge, and finish with a tiny file.  I use a fine saw to part it off. A drop or two of CA on the peg, and I press the collar on, and make sure it is on square.

I've settled on the design I like, and I carve the heart shape in, and then use files and chisels to put the slopes on the head body.  I try to make them the same; but they never are; and that's what I want.  After the shape is right, I have been sealing them lately with a drop of CA.  Sand with 400 grit, dry, and then there is one more step. A drop or two of CA on the peg, and I press the collar on, and make sure it is on square.

It's fun to do, but it doest take a lot of time.  A tailpiece is somewhat more straightforward, but they can take a while to do too.   I go for simple, but you can make them any way you like.

 

20200201_092525.thumb.jpeg.33e98a020f9b8ed63ff7246d6a70d178.jpeg

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Hey Uncle, I use either a chisel or a small Iwasaki half round file; whichever one seems to be making the best progress!  I only use a flat file on round parts. I don't know why, the round works better on flat, and the flat works better on round.  Then, I finish by scraping with the chisel.  I only use sandpaper after it is sealed.  The same with any other part on the instrument.  

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On 2/1/2020 at 8:36 AM, Mampara said:

Here is another good one - 

 

Hi Mampara

What is the powder added near the final stage? (Sorry, I speak spanish)

 

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On 2/4/2020 at 4:10 AM, tango said:

Hi Mampara

What is the powder added near the final stage? (Sorry, I speak spanish)

 

No worries Tango, English is not my native tongue either - I am not familiar with this kind of soapstone used in the video clip so cannot really comment on it. I only know Rhodesian soapstone and that's usually a darker green colour and would probably mess up the pegs so I would stay away from it.

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On 2/2/2020 at 1:31 AM, Ken_N said:

 I use an awl to poke a center in the small end, and put the head in my fixture I made, and turn the shaft straight.

 

 

Ken is that fixture working like a friction chuck? Do you use in a chuck or on a drive center?

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It is simply a disc of wood with a rectangular slot. The blank is put in it and shimmed.  Put the disc in the chuck and support the end of the blank with a live center.

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22 hours ago, Ken_N said:

It is simply a disc of wood with a rectangular slot. The blank is put in it and shimmed.  Put the disc in the chuck and support the end of the blank with a live center.

Got it, cheers mate!

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On 2/5/2020 at 3:10 AM, Mampara said:

No worries Tango, English is not my native tongue either - I am not familiar with this kind of soapstone used in the video clip so cannot really comment on it. I only know Rhodesian soapstone and that's usually a darker green colour and would probably mess up the pegs so I would stay away from it.

Thanks Mampara

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