Sign in to follow this  
Michael_Molnar

Finishing Spruce Edges

Recommended Posts

1 hour ago, Davide Sora said:

Probably a few lines would be enough to express these concepts and instead I went too far with writing. Probably this will create more confusion than clarity given my poor command of the language, but I hope something is understandable and could be useful to someone.

At least it was useful to me as  English homework....:lol:

You should be proud of your command of the english language.  Every word was legible and if you didn't use the translator - pretty good sir.

Where is the you-tube video showing how to cut wedges using a bow saw?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, nathan slobodkin said:

Since equisetum is used in a direction perpendicular to the striations it's pretty hard to use it on the inside of a concave edge without flattening or rounding over the crest.

Equisetum can relatively easily be thinned and then attached to various backings.  The example in the attached photo works well in the area Mike Molnar has been concerned about.

Equisetum on cork backing.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Davide Sora said:

The direction of the cut must always be with the scraper kept angled with respect to the grain and in the case of the fluting and edge area always directed downwards, that is, towards purfling. purfling divides this area into two parts and the cutting direction is always in opposite directions for each part. This means that to obtain a very clean finish it will be necessary to work the external one (let's say the edge side) in one direction and the internal one (let's say the arching side) in the opposite direction. Also the purfling will have its preferential cutting direction and this must be considered in the last steps (very light) to obtain a clean surface of purfling too.

This is where my tests were leading me. Thanks, Davide.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, violguy said:

I have found suitable size pieces of thick glass make excellent scrapers...and they never need sharpening.

Yes.

Glass scrapers are one of the things I wish I knew when I started.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Glass scrapers are a wonder, it's true. Yet another thing I learned from Tom Sparks. He took a framed picture of the leduc del Gesu off the wall, popped the glass out, scored it with the corner of a file, and snapped a chunk off. He then proceeded to scrape the most incredible curls of maple off my fiddle I was working on. He dropped the shard on my bench and wandered off without a word. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Michael_Molnar said:

Oops. I forgot that  @Barry J. Griffiths sent me a glass scraper 6 years ago almost to the day. It worked like a charm. I forgot all about it and must make another. They do dull over time. 

What thickness is the glass? 3/32?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 hours ago, uncle duke said:

You should be proud of your command of the english language.  Every word was legible and if you didn't use the translator - pretty good sir.

Where is the you-tube video showing how to cut wedges using a bow saw?

I wish I could, but a little assistance from the translator is still necessary for me, I am still missing too many terms or I don't remember them quickly enough....:rolleyes:

The video on how to cut wedges is still missing, however I do not use a bow saw but a Ryoba double edge Japanese saw, very efficient.;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/31/2020 at 10:49 PM, nathan slobodkin said:

Since equisetum is used in a direction perpendicular to the striations it's pretty hard to use it on the inside of a concave edge without flattening or rounding over the crest.

Not if you soften it by soaking in water, then towelling dry

also, a light glue size might make things less prone to marks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/31/2020 at 5:51 PM, uncle duke said:

You should be proud of your command of the english language.  Every word was legible and if you didn't use the translator - pretty good sir.

Where is the you-tube video showing how to cut wedges using a bow saw?

Absolutely! I really admire how Davide's English has progressed since he first started posting here. Far better than any Italian that I have managed to glean here and there.

Translator can be useful, but often it twists words around and create awkward sentences that do not always convey exactly what the writer meant.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/30/2020 at 3:39 PM, David Burgess said:

I also do some cleanup work in the corners with a super-sharp scraper, ground to about 20 degrees  Such an acute angle won't hold up for heavier work, but works well for light cleanup work where you want it to cut with almost no pressure, and cut rather than compressing the wood.

Can I ask if you use them as sharp as a knife or turning the edge with the burnisher like a normal scraper?

I have only sporadically tried this type of sharpening at an acute angle and without getting satisfactory results, probably because I am too afraid to do more damage than anything else and because I have never got used to using them correctly.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Davide Sora said:

Can I ask if you use them as sharp as a knife or turning the edge with the burnisher like a normal scraper?

I sharpen them like a knife, and then turn the edge over. After the edge wears, I can perhaps roll the turned-over edge back, strop it, and roll it over again several times, before the edge becomes so work-hardened that it begins to chip. Then I need to remove enough material to get past that embrittled portion.

But your method appears to work very well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, Urban Luthier said:

Hi David. How thick are your knife edge scrapers if you don't mind me asking?

Most of mine are either .5 or 1mm thick. (Sometimes I like to be able to flex a wide thin scraper to conform to the contours of the arching, and other times I like a scraper which is thicker and rigid)

Of those I have used heavily, the Eberle and Sandvik (now Bahco) brands have had the best edge retention, staying sharp the longest. But I have had these scrapers for a long time, and don't know if the current product is the same.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, David Burgess said:

Of those I have used heavily, the Eberle and Sandvik (now Bahco) brands have had the best edge retention, staying sharp the longest. But I have had these scrapers for a long time, and don't know if the current product is the same.

Mine are Eberle, bought over thirty years ago, the shop that sold them now has closed (Goth). I tried to look for a seller who had them because many ask me where they can be found, but without success. If anyone has any idea of someone selling this brand of scrapers it is an information that i would like to have to be able to share (I don't need them, just to answer questions).

Quality scrapers make the difference....;)

PS Of course Eberle company still exist, but buying an entire coil of that steel is not very viable....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Davide and David. Lee valley sells Bahco scrapers. I'm going to try sharpening to a knife edge and rolling over the edge per your workflow David.

I can get my scrapers sharp and use them effectively but it takes way longer than it should

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Davide Sora said:

Mine are Eberle, bought over thirty years ago, the shop that sold them now has closed (Goth). I tried to look for a seller who had them because many ask me where they can be found, but without success. If anyone has any idea of someone selling this brand of scrapers it is an information that i would like to have to be able to share (I don't need them, just to answer questions).

Quality scrapers make the difference....;)

PS Of course Eberle company still exist, but buying an entire coil of that steel is not very viable....

A couple of sources for Eberle or Bahco brand scrapers. (Again, I don't know whether they are the same, or  better or worse than these brands once were, since I tended to buy in sufficient quantities when I found something that worked well to last me a lifetime. That was probably at least 30 years ago.)

https://www.woodcraft.com/products/cabinet-scrapers-2pc?gclid=EAIaIQobChMItuvbnLu15wIVth6tBh1eXAJREAQYAiABEgLou_D_BwE

http://www.howardcore.com/cgi-bin/shopper.cgi?search=action&category=TOOL&template=Templates/HC_SR2.htm&keywords="Scrapers"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, David Burgess said:

I just noticed that violins88 is logged in. John, do you think that Powdered Metal might work for card scrapers?

David,

A customer of mine in Washington state loved the PM-X steel for knives. Bought several orders. He suggested to me they might make good scrapers, so I did some tests with PM-X hardened to HRC 60. The tests as scrapers were not promising. BUT I will be the first to admit that I don’t really understand scraper sharpening. Maybe softer PM-X would work.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, David Burgess said:

A couple of sources for Eberle or Bahco brand scrapers. (Again, I don't know whether they are the same, or  better or worse than these brands once were, since I tended to buy in sufficient quantities when I found something that worked well to last me a lifetime. That was probably at least 30 years ago.)

https://www.woodcraft.com/products/cabinet-scrapers-2pc?gclid=EAIaIQobChMItuvbnLu15wIVth6tBh1eXAJREAQYAiABEgLou_D_BwE

http://www.howardcore.com/cgi-bin/shopper.cgi?search=action&category=TOOL&template=Templates/HC_SR2.htm&keywords="Scrapers"

Thanks, I will pass the link to who will ask me about the eberle scrapers, I hope the steel is still the same as I have.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.