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Michael Szyper

Power sharpening devices

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Hi friends, 

due to personal issues i have to work in two places which are about 2 hrs drive apart. I already own a Tormek T-7 which i consider to be a reliable sharpening device. I am thinking what to do with my 2nd workspace. 

These are my ideas:

1. use the water stones i already have 

2. Buy another sharpening device:

- Tormek

- Slow rotating CBN wheel

- the Shinko sharpening device https://www.dictum.com/en/grinders/shinko-sharpening-machine-stone-included-716020

I know that some guys here are pretty convinced about the 1500 rpm CBN-wheels, but i still fear it would destroy my tools due to the heat. Does anybody have long-time experience?

 

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For some 30 years I have used only a hand grinder with a good tool rest. It offers ultimate control--turn as slowly as you want, stop grinding instantly, etc. They are extremely cheap as antiques and if you buy well you can use a modern stone. Quiet, safe, accurate, no electricity--what's not to like? After using mine, MANY people have converted.

From there I go to a stone or two, according to what's needed, and for final buffing of some tools, where applicable, I have another hand grinder with a hard felt wheel on it. My current favorite hand stones are a small coticule and a natural grey finishing stone from China that was very inexpensive, and I also have a strip of leather glued to the edge of my bench for certain tools.

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I use the TORMEK when I am in a hurry.  When I do need something special I go to my Japanese wather Stones (KING, SHAPTON), grits 200, 400, 600, 1200, 6000, 8000.

The King gouge stones are nice too.

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I have had good experience with the CBN wheels.

A very long fine point knife will still burn easily if you apply to much pressure.

But I use it for hollow grinding and then finish on honing stones.

For gouges and fingerplanes and my ebony plane blades I use the Work Sharp system

Dorian

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Whatever gets the job done faster...we can't charge our clients for us being anally retentive re sharpening.  Tormek is too slow for cutting back. I use a CBN grinder for that for primary bevel. Secondary bevel Tormek finish on diamond plates or  oil stones Washita and Arkansas and final buff on Tormek

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13 hours ago, Michael Darnton said:

For some 30 years I have used only a hand grinder with a good tool rest. It offers ultimate control--turn as slowly as you want, stop grinding instantly, etc. They are extremely cheap as antiques and if you buy well you can use a modern stone.

I looked at a bunch of antique hand grinders on eBay last year but it looks like the vast majority of them were designed for use with 4-inch grinding wheels. I did find one that someone had fitted with a modern 6-inch wheel, but I was outbid.

I rather like the Tormek myself, but I think a hand-cranked grinder would be a good companion for rough grinding.

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Thanks to everybody for the great feedback. Generally i look for a fast sharpening solution. 

There are a few reasons why i am not totally satisfied with my tormek.

- It is pretty difficult to get a perfectly even edge crosswise because of the too soft stone. For jointer plane blades i always have to do a few strokes on the diamond plate. Not much of an effort but also time i would like to save.

Also i do not understand why they couldn’t speed up the wheel spinning a bit. It would still never overheat but make sharpening a bit faster. 

I like that about the Shinko/Makita grinding system: The stone speed is way faster.

 

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10 hours ago, Michael Szyper said:

Also i do not understand why they couldn’t speed up the wheel spinning a bit. It would still never overheat but make sharpening a bit faster.  I like that about the Shinko/Makita grinding system: The stone speed is way faster.

 

If the Tormek spun much faster, I think it would have a tendency to sling water.

The Shinko has a flexible splash guard, which is much easier to do on a horizontally mounted grindstone. The downside (for me) is that since the Shinko is using the flat side of the stone, it wouldn't allow "hollow grinding".

 

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3 hours ago, David Burgess said:

If the Tormek spun much faster, I think it would have a tendency to sling water.

Finally i bought today the Shinko. You are right, without the splash guard the mud spread literally all around the workshop. 

There are tools where i don’t like a hollow finish, for example knives, Japanese chisels and gouges. For these tools the shinko is fantastic, the 1000 stone takes about 15 seconds for cutting down the micro phase. I can do it by hand, so it does not take me any “setup time” for jigs like on the Tormek. 

The 6000 stone is also pretty nice, can refresh a dull knife blade in seconds if the edge has not been damaged too bad. 

Only the 180 grit is rubbish, either the shinko is too fast for it or the material is bound too strong. But actually there is no need for this grit. Finally it is pretty much what i wanted, a cheaper machine which enables me to sharpen pretty fast some smaller tools.

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You probably already know this, but the advantage to a hollow grind is only a very small amount of material needs to be removed when touching up a plane iron or chisel, knife, etc. on a flat whetstone; with a flat bevel, the whole face of the bevel needs to be reduced until the desired edge is obtained.

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On 1/28/2020 at 4:05 AM, David Burgess said:

Oh me oh my! Isn't this a good example of a solution looking for a problem?

You would be surprised how well this method actually works! Saves a lot of money too.

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2 hours ago, Mampara said:

You would be surprised how well this method actually works! Saves a lot of money too.

I can see how it would be great for jointer/planer blades. Perhaps I was mistaken in thinking that it was being suggested for hand-plane blades.

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On 1/27/2020 at 8:34 AM, saintjohnbarleycorn said:

saw thi the other day for flat blades https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pUoEPgcqUFc

This might not be as great for jointer/planer blades as the presenter tries to make it seem. I worked in a cabinet shop with a 25" planer and 9" jointer that used thin, flexible, disposable blades just like the ones he's sharpening. The problem as I see it is that in addition to becoming generally dull, the blades would also inevitably acquire nicks that would not hone out by any method without altering their geometry. The blades were not so expensive to justify this effort. For blades meant to be re-sharpened this might make sense. Otherwise not.

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8 hours ago, MarkBouquet said:

This might not be as great for jointer/planer blades as the presenter tries to make it seem. I worked in a cabinet shop with a 25" planer and 9" jointer that used thin, flexible, disposable blades just like the ones he's sharpening. The problem as I see it is that in addition to becoming generally dull, the blades would also inevitably acquire nicks that would not hone out by any method without altering their geometry. The blades were not so expensive to justify this effort. For blades meant to be re-sharpened this might make sense. Otherwise not.

I just grind the nicks away with a Tormek jig and then finish with stones as shown in the video. I don't use thin flexible blades though and make sure that each blade in the set has equal material removed to keep things balanced. The blade life is much extended if you don`t wait too long between sharpenings and it keeps my wallet happy too.

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