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PhilipKT

What is this lapping material?

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This is an Albert Schubert cello bow. I’ve never heard the name and can’t find any reference to it in my Erhardt books, nor anything meaningful online.

My shop friend thought I had asked for it and wondered why because he didn’t think much of it at all. I was referring to a different bow, but he gave this one to me anyway.

Turns out to be a very nice bow! I know weight is less important than feel, but it does feel a wee bit light at 77g, but it is better than almost any of my other old German sticks.

my question is about the lapping: it looks like simple string, intertwined with a strip of very thin leather and wrapped tight around the stick without any adhesive.

its actually fairly appealing, but it looks like a lot of work where silver, tinsel, or copper would be more easily applied.

what is it and why? And does this perhaps help discern when and where it originated?

thanks!

 

FE52FE61-43E1-427F-9CCC-7353F88AFDC7.jpeg

D4275B6B-0403-4FDE-A693-70D070ABC06B.jpeg

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The wrapping looks to me like brown and white strips of plastic wound on spirally.  Black and white is more common, but I have a spool of brown that I bought from Dick as bow lapping years ago.

Someone else just asked about Albert Schubert.  So, repeating what I said there, this is a trade name used on medium-grade German bows early in the 20th Century.  I see bows with this stamp occasionally.  I've not found any other information about it.

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It looks like brown leather thong and white bead cord (thick) doubled up inbetween.  Bead cord (not this guage)is not too uncommon.  

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On 1/20/2020 at 9:01 AM, PhilipKT said:

This is an Albert Schubert cello bow. I’ve never heard the name and can’t find any reference to it in my Erhardt books, nor anything meaningful online.

My shop friend thought I had asked for it and wondered why because he didn’t think much of it at all. I was referring to a different bow, but he gave this one to me anyway.

Turns out to be a very nice bow! I know weight is less important than feel, but it does feel a wee bit light at 77g, but it is better than almost any of my other old German sticks.

my question is about the lapping: it looks like simple string, intertwined with a strip of very thin leather and wrapped tight around the stick without any adhesive.

its actually fairly appealing, but it looks like a lot of work where silver, tinsel, or copper would be more easily applied.

what is it and why? And does this perhaps help discern when and where it originated?

thanks!

 

FE52FE61-43E1-427F-9CCC-7353F88AFDC7.jpeg

D4275B6B-0403-4FDE-A693-70D070ABC06B.jpeg

Clearly the bow of a dental floss tycoon from Montana...

Think we need more detailed up close shots, to me, based on the pic, it looks like thread.

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39 minutes ago, jezzupe said:

Clearly the bow of a dental floss tycoon from Montana...

Think we need more detailed up close shots, to me, based on the pic, it looks like thread.

The words, "field expedient", come to mind.  :lol:

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I wish I could get closer. The brown strip looks like leather but I can’t think why anyone would go to the trouble of cutting thin leather strips and then alternating it with simple string, when metal wire of some kind would be far quicker.

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