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Byrdbop

Cracked head of bow. Disaster?

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Bow took a hit knocking off tip but the crack is the main concern.  I'm about to have it rehaired.  It's my favourite bow.  Will the head fall apart when the plug is taken out resulting in the need for a pricey repair?  Crack goes all the way round btw. 

IMG_20200119_103146.jpg

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I'm not qualified to answer, but I will tell you that my bow has a repaired head crack.   My luthier showed it to me before he sold it to me after I fell in love with the bow. 

His assessment was that the head crack repair was solid but it knocked at lot of value from the bow, more than half, reflected in what I paid him. 

 

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I can’t be sure as I don’t have it in my hands but I think it needs to be splined before it is re-haired. It seems to need a tip plate as well.

 

DLB

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If the recent trauma caused the diagonal crack in the head then yes, disaster I'm afraid. 

As Dwight says, I would have a secure repair done (spline) before rehairing or putting any tension on the bow.

 

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I don't know where you are located but there are som very fine bow restorers here on the board.  I would caution you not to play with it or have the hair tight until a qualified person has seen it.  It will lose value but it can be repaired in such a way as to play just as well as it did.

 

DLB

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3 hours ago, Byrdbop said:

Bow took a hit knocking off tip but the crack is the main concern.  I'm about to have it rehaired.  It's my favourite bow.  Will the head fall apart when the plug is taken out resulting in the need for a pricey repair?  Crack goes all the way round btw. 

IMG_20200119_103146.jpg

Based on what I can see in the photo, it appears to be either a very old repair, or a more recent less-skilled repair.

If it is an old repair, it has probably survived many rehairs already.

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56 minutes ago, David Burgess said:

Based on what I can see in the photo, it appears to be either a very old repair, or a more recent less-skilled repair.

If it is an old repair, it has probably survived many rehairs already.

Agree - I too am puzzled by this because the crack doesn't look like the result of a recent trauma - even the tip which was knocked off appears to be repaired.

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10 minutes ago, martin swan said:

Agree - I too am puzzled by this because the crack doesn't look like the result of a recent trauma - even the tip which was knocked off appears to be repaired.

I'll thrice that.  Looks like an old crack you may have never had a reason to notice.  The tip of the bow (not tip of plate) Looks intact, just the tip of the plate with some "schmoock" added in it's place.  Bottom line, if that crack is "live", then I'm sure you rehairer won't rehair it without a solution.

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20 minutes ago, martin swan said:

Agree - I too am puzzled by this because the crack doesn't look like the result of a recent trauma - even the tip which was knocked off appears to be repaired.

I had the tip repaired recently and on collection I was informed that the head may fall apart when being re-haired.  I bought the bow for pennies due to and despite the obvious damage because of it's playing qualities.  I had assumed the crack was repaired and solid. 

JON_8574.thumb.JPG.7876ee4314a75a0ef9d72ea4655caea2.jpg

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2 hours ago, Dwight Brown said:

...I think it needs to be splined...

I don't think a spline would help, because the crack is so close to the face plate.  Most of the spline would fall within the hair mortise, making it useless.

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If that crack on the side of the head is old (and holding) AND the tip plate is solid all around (NO tiny cracks at the edges of the tip block), then rehairing shouldn't be an issue, if done carefully. What is a problem, is possible damage to the tip, but the "goop" on the tip along with being careful might keep you from having an issue.  Bear in mind, this can all be repaired (tip). Can we have a pic looking down onto the tip plate to see the condition?

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2 minutes ago, Brad Dorsey said:

I don't think a spline would help, because the crack is so close to the face plate.  Most of the spline would fall within the hair mortise, making it useless.

Agreed. that crack on the side of the head looks like it was from an oversized plug being forced in, blowing out the side.

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46 minutes ago, Jeff White said:

If that crack on the side of the head is old (and holding) AND the tip plate is solid all around (NO tiny cracks at the edges of the tip block), then rehairing shouldn't be an issue, if done carefully. What is a problem, is possible damage to the tip, but the "goop" on the tip along with being careful might keep you from having an issue.  Bear in mind, this can all be repaired (tip). Can we have a pic looking down onto the tip plate to see the condition?

Aplogies for pic quality as only have phone with me. Tip repair is decent but looks odd in pic above. 

IMG_20200119_225208.jpg

IMG_20200119_225750.jpg

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Should one take a bow on for re-hair, it is only prudent to point out an old repaired head crack, and point out that one will not feel responsible for an old repair that one did not execute oneself.

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22 minutes ago, Jerry Pasewicz said:

It looks to me that this may be a blown out cheek.  

Agreed, hence I wanted to see the plate condition. Seems like the spacing between the plug and edge of the plate are too small especially considering the blowout problem.  I would want some security there.  It also might seem there is a small crack starting there?  THAT would be a dis qualifier for me.

43 minutes ago, jacobsaunders said:

Should one take a bow on for re-hair, it is only prudent to point out an old repaired head crack, and point out that one will not feel responsible for an old repair that one did not execute oneself.

At least

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Put in a spline and glue it up. It'll be stronger and more useful as a working bow,  than a cracked artifact.

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17 minutes ago, jacobsaunders said:

What advantage doe you expect from a "Spline"?

I'd  ask that too.

It seems to me that a spline would just give it two more places  to  break. 

It looks to me like an old repair.  These things can be fine for years, especially  so low down on the head. You might find a threaded silver pin or a screw underneath  the  tip plate - that's  what would  have  been  done  here. Probably  still  what I'd do if someone  twisted my arm to do that repair. 

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8 hours ago, Jeff White said:

Agreed, hence I wanted to see the plate condition. Seems like the spacing between the plug and edge of the plate are too small especially considering the blowout problem.  I would want some security there.  It also might seem there is a small crack starting there?  THAT would be a dis qualifier for me.

At least

Pic quality again not great.  Plug looks like amateurish work?  Not mine I hasten to add.  Continuation of crack clear in 2nd pic. 

IMG_20200120_083030.jpg

IMG_20200120_082931.jpg

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I agree a spline isn't going to help. From the first post I got the impression that the crack was new and went all the way round - this is an old repair and if the back of the mortise is reinforced internally either as Conor suggests or with wood then there's nothing to do.

 

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With the right glue, a cross grain spline would help prevent any future breaks and would be stronger than the original wood. Not using a spline means the gluing surface area is quite small and will likely fail again.

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