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David Hart

Fixing a poorly repaired crack

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G'day fellas,

So I have a top with a saddle crack that was repaired at some point with the dreaded PVA.

With some careful work I have cleared out the offending substance, but the crack will not come together to be glued... It appears that the crack wandered off the grain and where the end grain was exposed has swelled. 

While I'm sitting here contemplating this conundrum... have you ever come across a similar situation (Fixing bad repairs)? How would you approach this situation?

I'm currently thinking if I carefully take wood off from the area where the end grain is exposed, it might come together.

Hope you're all enjoying the hols.

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14 hours ago, David Hart said:

... have you ever come across a similar situation (Fixing bad repairs)?

Seriously?????  It seems that's all I do sometimes. I need a higher end clientele, resulting in fiddles that have been well taken care of over the years and I won't have to undo S##t work.  It would be nice  (to be the King....JH). B)

    Seriously though,  everytime I take white glue of some sorts out of a crack, there is a huge gap of missing wood.  I think someone using white glue on a crack and missing would go hand in hand, for obvious reasons.

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1 hour ago, Jeff White said:

Seriously?????  It seems that's all I do sometimes. I need a higher end clientele, resulting in fiddles that have been well taken care of over the years and I won't have to undo S##t work.  It would be nice  (to be the King....JH). B)

    Seriously though,  everytime I take white glue of some sorts out of a crack, there is a huge gap of missing wood. 

 I'm not getting that. Might be better to look at your removal methods.

Sure, prior "repairs"with white glues and epoxies and cyanoacrylates can be among the most challenging to correct, and Titebond and epoxies can serve as as decent gap fillers when one is unable to get a decent joint

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2 hours ago, David Burgess said:

 I'm not getting that. Might be better to look at your removal methods.

Sure, prior "repairs"with white glues and epoxies and cyanoacrylates can be among the most challenging to correct, and Titebond and epoxies can serve as as decent gap fillers when one is unable to get a decent joint

The point I'm making is that the same person who would use white glue to glue a violin belly crack, is the same person who is not going to do a good job of glueing the crack to begin with, (aggressive over cleaning-removing wood)leaving me with a crack that is a mess.  "and Titebond and epoxies can serve as as decent gap fillers when one is unable to get a decent joint"  I'm not sure what you mean here.  Are you abdicating for this? Or, saying what's in the mind of the previous repairer?

"Might be better to look at your removal methods"  I will admit that I have to use more hydration that normal to remove white glues and the crack has to sit awhile to shrink back.  Thoughts on removing water based white glues? I use some vinegar in the water.  It seems that i don't remove any wood when the glue gets mushy.  It seems peel out, but without wood fibers.  Better idea?

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Dilute citric acid. Start weak then add acid powder to strength as needed to remove the white clue.

Citric acid powder is available in local supermarkets in the canning supplies aisle.

Edited by violguy
miss-spelled word

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