Sign in to follow this  
kwillson

Help identifying

Recommended Posts

Hello,
 
I recently acquired a Giuseppe violin Cremona 1736 and wanted information on it's authenticity.  It is old, but almost too good to be true.  Included are pictures for your reference. Thank you.  Cordially Kalum

20191223_090710.jpg

20191223_090757.jpg

20191223_090635.jpg

20191223_090623.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, it is easy enough to tell you what it isn't.

Difficult to tell with these pictures, but it is not what it is labeled, nor Italian.

Could be a decent instrument.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I presume a late 19th C „Verleger“ (cottage industry) violin from Mittenwald in need of refurbishment. The photo is inadequate to judge if it has capital damage by the button or not.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, jacobsaunders said:

I presume a late 19th C „Verleger“ (cottage industry) violin from Mittenwald in need of refurbishment. The photo is inadequate to judge if it has capital damage by the button or not.

Looks like the whole button area is messed up a couple of times over, including a ‚brick‘

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, jacobsaunders said:

I presume a late 19th C „Verleger“ (cottage industry) violin from Mittenwald in need of refurbishment. The photo is inadequate to judge if it has capital damage by the button or not.

20191223_090635.jpg.4435842fb5ba6c3b83cba9bbd18ba817.jpg

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, akaBobH said:

Major alignment problem with neck/fingerboard

Not sure you can tell from the angle of the pictures. Might be ok?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Kalum,

Since you are new here, I will explain the meaning of all the brief dismissive comments you have received about your violin:  It is too good to be true.  It was not made in Cremona in 1736.  It bears this label because it was (and it still is) common practice to insert labels bearing the names of famous dead makers in violins to indicate the model of the violin or to try to cash in on the reputation of the named maker.  Despite what the label says, your violin was made in Mittenwald, Germany, probably a little over 100 years ago.

Your violin would have a retail value in a violin shop of a few thousand dollars if it were in mint condition.  But its condition is so compromised that its commercial value is about $25 for use as an ornament.  The cost of restoring it would far exceed its value after the restoration.  The condition problems that have been mentioned are the damaged button area (The button is at the top of the back where the neck attaches.), the buggered bass side sound hole, the neck  mis-alignment, and the varnish loss.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.