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Arch Height Measured from what reference point?


deusAblutum
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I've read from some people that the arch height should include that plate thickness, so that an arch height of 15mm would be the total height of the plate. And I've also read that the arch height should be measured from the lowest point of the arching to the highest point, so that the fluting on the plate acts to raise the arch height. What way is the standard method of measuring a violin's arching?

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In new making the final arch hgt in the classic 'tradizione Cremonese' is typically established as you carve the top arch first, therefore the un-excavated flat bottom measured with your dial calipers, is this total thickness —before you begin scooping out the inside—so yes this would include the plate thickness at this point.

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3 hours ago, zdalton13 said:

I've read from some people that the arch height should include that plate thickness, so that an arch height of 15mm would be the total height of the plate. And I've also read that the arch height should be measured from the lowest point of the arching to the highest point, so that the fluting on the plate acts to raise the arch height. What way is the standard method of measuring a violin's arching?

The most convenient way to measure the arching height of an antique violin is when one has to glue the belly to a flat board in the processes of making a plaster cast. One may simply lay a ruler, or other straight object on the highest point of the arching, then measure the distance between ruler and flat board on each side, add together and divide by two.

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11 hours ago, Conor Russell said:

 If you start at 15mm, you'll probably  end up with 14mm final height,  which is very low.

Most  nice  old violins have higher arching - I'd say 16 to 18 on average. I've just finished  one with an 18mm belly, and I'm very  happy  with  the  results.  

 

My 15mm was totally arbitrary. I'm working on a violin now with a plate top plate height of roughly 19.5mm. I didn't realize how high it was until I did some googling which is why I asked where my reference point should be. Compared to the arching on my cheap student model it looks fine. I'm curious now what qualities I should expect from an arch so high and as to whether I should adjust the arching of the back plate. As the unhollowed back plate stands now it is rough 17.5mm.

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10 hours ago, zdalton13 said:

Is it necessary for the total thickness of the instrument to be 62mm? Surely some high arched instruments are thicker.

Older postings here at maestronet seem to think 60 to 62 mm max.  From what I've learned rib heights can be from 29 mm upwards to right at 33.5 mm - no higher.  31 mm can be a safe bet all throughout at first.  When you get a little bit more experience maybe try some thing like 32.5 at the tailblock area and then gradually taper down to the neck area to 31.25 for an example.

Ex. - let's use 60mm total height.  60 - 31.5 rib height = let's see, 28.5 to work with.  Let's divide that in half.  14.25 left for each plate.  Hmm, at the least I'd like 15.7 mm for the minimum height for a belly so that would leave me 12.8 mm for the maximum back height - not enough for me - we'd need a little more.  How about that allowable extra 2 mm ?   Fine, thank you.   Now there's 14.8 mm to work with.  That's more like it.

Not sure what you're making but did see your rib structure from August.  If you haven't glued to the plates yet maybe set the garland on some paper, trace around the garland and compare to your original plan.  I see long and thick corner areas - the distance the ribs miter up at their ends from the block point and the rib thickness at the bends before the points (miters).  Looking at other makers work can give you an idea of what I'm typing about.

Check everything and make the adjustsments now if you can stand to check now.  I agree with John - the more you get right now , the less you'll have to deal with later.

Yes, you can make a higher/taller instrument - when you find something that may have potential tone wise stay with that plan until you have more or less done everything to make that particular plan work.  

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