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PhilipKT

Violin Frog: please help

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In the pile of stuff I found this frog. It looks very nice and worth saving.I would like to ask the folks to chime in with yea or nay. 

This is what I noticed in addition to the silver mounting, which is also found in poor frogs:

The button is pinned.

the two-piece heel plate is pinned in two places on the rear, (but the piece behind the slide doesn’t appear to be pinned at all.)

The wood seems to be good quality.

the underslide is neither pinned nor has screws. It seems to be merely glued in place.

The slide is simple MOP. I’m not sure that indicates any kind of quality but does it indicate age? 

overall, I make no presumptions on origin or value but it looks to me like it is older and at least better quality.

finally, can I get some useful advice about details to look for when looking at a frog to determine quality?

thanks. (And thanks in advance for not offering snarky comments that are no help, cough cough)

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Does look French to me. Not a recognizeable big-name, valuable bowmaker to my eyes, but something like a ca. 1870-80 Bazin or Husson, maybe made for a "Lupot model" without pearl eyes. The simple butt-joint at the heel/back plate instead of a mitred joint suggests a maker like that. It looks in decent condition and could be of use to someone with a suitable stick. I actually could use one like that at the moment, but being in Paris there a litterally dozens of these sitting in drawers and boxes in most bowmakers' shops. 

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There are also later frogs by Pfretzschner etc. looking very similar, especially the rather wide pins, at the same side of the adjuster, and the straight front edge of the ferrule could suggest a Markneukirchen origin.

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The MOP looks like European oyster, which means it is after the end of the freshwater mussel (practically extinct in Europe except for a very few rivers in Norway) and the start of international MOP trade. So something after 1850 and before 1880.

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Lots in Canada too.  Don't know which species are in trouble...but I do know there's one invasive species we'd like to get rid of.  Maybe the bowmaking industry can help us out? ^_^

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9 hours ago, Felefar said:

The MOP looks like European oyster, which means it is after the end of the freshwater mussel (practically extinct in Europe except for a very few rivers in Norway) and the start of international MOP trade. So something after 1850 and before 1880.

I would be very wary of identifying a frog from the shell material. It’s often not original.

Besides, we see a lot of mid 20th century Hill bows with this sort of pearl.

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