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tartarane

veritas plane

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hello I lost one of my thumb plane or fingerplane.

would a Veritas Compact Pocket Plane be a good choice as a replacement

does the screw work better than on the miniature plane from veritas too ?

I found that when I tighten the screw the cap of the plane skid

I don't want an ibex, don't like the new herdim, the new one should have a flat sole 

the Veritas Compact Pocket Plane looks ok but a bit wide

( will mostly be use for working on bridges and fingerboards)

thank you for alternative suggestion

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I’m not quite sure what size of plane you are looking for, for fingerboards I don’t think a thumb plane will be much use. For shaping the face of a bridge you would need a smaller plane like a thumb plane.

Seems you will need two planes, otherwise you will have a plane that is too small for some jobs, and too big for others.

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Could you send a link to the plane you are looking at? Most of the Veritas block planes are bevel up with a 12 degree bed and 27 degree bevel. 39 degrees could give you tear out when working with difficult hardwood. You could sharpen a steeper bevel on the blade.

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2 hours ago, Dave Slight said:

I’m not quite sure what size of plane you are looking for, for fingerboards I don’t think a thumb plane will be much use. For shaping the face of a bridge you would need a smaller plane like a thumb plane.

Seems you will need two planes, otherwise you will have a plane that is too small for some jobs, and too big for others.

thank you for your reply

it is my thumb plane that I lost but I thought may be I could use a 12 mm wide 

but may be you're right I do use two planes at the moment

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2 hours ago, Urban Luthier said:

Could you send a link to the plane you are looking at? Most of the Veritas block planes are bevel up with a 12 degree bed and 27 degree bevel. 39 degrees could give you tear out when working with difficult hardwood. You could sharpen a steeper bevel on the blade.

I was thinking of this plane which seems to be an inbetween  size
cuttiing angle is low
the problem is if the screw holds really well
By the miniature plane version ist is not the case
thank you
703265_01_P_WE_8_Veritas_Taschenhobel_kompakt_WZ_jpg.jpg
 
Due to its blade width of 21.5 mm, this compact pocket plane is ideal for sophisticated work in model and instrument making. Combined feed and lateral adjustment lever. Non-adjustable mouth. Blade angle 15°, bevel angle 20°. This results in a cutting angle of 35°.
re 
  • Blade material PM-V11™
  • Blade width 21 mm
  • Blade thickness 2.7 mm
  • Overall length 115 mm
  • Weight 256 g
 
 
 
 

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2 hours ago, tartarane said:

hello I lost one of my thumb plane or fingerplane.

would a Veritas Compact Pocket Plane be a good choice as a replacement

 

I don't recall having ever used anything described as a "Veritas Compact Pocket Plane", but in general, the quality of Veritas planes seems to be very good.

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2 hours ago, Dave Slight said:

I’m not quite sure what size of plane you are looking for, for fingerboards I don’t think a thumb plane will be much use. For shaping the face of a bridge you would need a smaller plane like a thumb plane.

Seems you will need two planes, otherwise you will have a plane that is too small for some jobs, and too big for others.

Huh, I've always shaped the face of a bridge with a LN 102 and been fine. Come to think of it, I do the fingerboard with a 102 as well. Useful little beast. 

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Saw this handsome rascal at the Lie-Nielsen tool show in Austin last weekend.  https://www.lie-nielsen.com/products/Model Maker's Block Plane  They also make a convex sole version.  I'd buy it if I didn't already have the compact pocket plane.  The other issue to consider on the bridge work is building the right jig.

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I have the stainless steel version of the the Veritas plane you're asking about. The adjuster is excellent. The ergonomics are excellent. The blade steel is excellent. Do you detect a pattern here? I'm certain that the malleable iron model you're asking about is equally excellent. I can't, however, argue that it's the best plane for your tasks. That's for you to decide.

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4 minutes ago, Julian Cossmann Cooke said:

Saw this handsome rascal at the Lie-Nielsen tool show in Austin last weekend.  https://www.lie-nielsen.com/products/Model Maker's Block Plane  They also make a convex sole version.  I'd buy it if I didn't already have the compact pocket plane.  The other issue to consider on the bridge work is building the right jig.

I was taught to work the bridge surfaces free hand, often pulling the bridge across the inverted block plane on various directions as needed. I've seen various holding jigs for the bridge while working but never tried one. Curious to give it a shot though.

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1 minute ago, JacksonMaberry said:

I was taught to work the bridge surfaces free hand, often pulling the bridge across the inverted block plane on various directions as needed. I've seen various holding jigs for the bridge while working but never tried one. Curious to give it a shot though.

Ill post a pic of mine -- different kinds for violin and cello though I suspect one could duplicate the cello design for violin.

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28 minutes ago, JacksonMaberry said:

I was taught to work the bridge surfaces free hand, often pulling the bridge across the inverted block plane on various directions as needed. I've seen various holding jigs for the bridge while working but never tried one. Curious to give it a shot though.

 

28 minutes ago, JacksonMaberry said:

I was taught to work the bridge surfaces free hand, often pulling the bridge across the inverted block plane on various directions as needed. I've seen various holding jigs for the bridge while working but never tried one. Curious to give it a shot though.

 

26 minutes ago, Julian Cossmann Cooke said:

Ill post a pic of mine -- different kinds for violin and cello though I suspect one could duplicate the cello design for violin.

 

29 minutes ago, JacksonMaberry said:

I was taught to work the bridge surfaces free hand, often pulling the bridge across the inverted block plane on various directions as needed. I've seen various holding jigs for the bridge while working but never tried one. Curious to give it a shot though.

I have the nielsen and I hate it wrong size for my hand and difficult to let the blade show just what you need

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If they have a low angle block plane with an adjustable mouth, that's the one I would be considering. For fingerboards, I use a low angle Record block plane  for "rough hogging", and then finish up with a small Lie Nielsen scraper plane.

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5 hours ago, tartarane said:
I was thinking of this plane which seems to be an inbetween  size
cuttiing angle is low
the problem is if the screw holds really well
By the miniature plane version ist is not the case
thank you
703265_01_P_WE_8_Veritas_Taschenhobel_kompakt_WZ_jpg.jpg
 
Due to its blade width of 21.5 mm, this compact pocket plane is ideal for sophisticated work in model and instrument making. Combined feed and lateral adjustment lever. Non-adjustable mouth. Blade angle 15°, bevel angle 20°. This results in a cutting angle of 35°.
re 
  • Blade material PM-V11™
  • Blade width 21 mm
  • Blade thickness 2.7 mm
  • Overall length 115 mm
  • Weight 256 g

I have the stainless steel version of this plane (same as @MarkBouquet notes above). This is an excellent quality tool and I use it all the time for trimming jobs. Not sure if it is best suited for bridges and shooting finger boards. I'd look at the Veritas high angle block plane. It is a full size block plane but I've seen many pros use it for the purposes you looking for.

https://www.leevalley.com/en-ca/shop/tools/hand-tools/planes/block/47881-veritas-standard-and-low-angle-block-planes 

I have one and it is the single most used tool in my shop - i use it for everything from thickening ribs, fingerboards, bridges, flattening rib garlands, prepping neck stock.

the PMV-11 steel takes a keen edge and stays sharp a long time.

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For  violin  fingerboards, and thicknessing ribs,  I have a Lee neilson 102.

Recently  I made a high speed  steel iron  for it from a Starrett red stripe  hacksaw  blade. Its superb for ebony - I suppose  I've done six or eight  boards without  having  to  sharpen  it. For planing ribs, I still use the iron that came with  it.

I dont really  use it for much else, but I wouldn't  be  without  it. 

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7 hours ago, JacksonMaberry said:

Huh, I've always shaped the face of a bridge with a LN 102 and been fine. Come to think of it, I do the fingerboard with a 102 as well. Useful little beast. 

My LN 102 will never leave my side. I'll be buried with that damn thing. 

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My 2 cents:

1) I have the stainless version of the pocket plane as well...  It was recommended by a friend.  Nice tool.  Fits the hand well, balance is good, great blade, etc.  Worked as well or better, and felt better, than any of the the other smaller planes I have... practically right out of the box (I did sharpen and true the blade).  I use it for a number of little jobs in the shop... but I wouldn't classify it as a fingerplane.

2) Fingerboards and bridges are not in that group of little jobs.  I use an old Craftsman knuckle cap block plane for bridges (and a ton of other stuff; They'll bury me with that plane Nick) and an old Stanley block plane with a very slightly modified (very slightly longitudinally convex) sole and a Hock blade for fingerboards.  I can go right from plane to paper with it.  Julian will probably be disappointed that, although I have them, I rarely use a jig for bridges.  :)

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41 minutes ago, Jeffrey Holmes said:

My 2 cents:

1) I have the stainless version of the pocket plane as well...  It was recommended by a friend.  Nice tool.  Fits the hand well, balance is good, great blade, etc.  Worked as well or better, and felt better, than any of the the other smaller planes I have... practically right out of the box (I did sharpen and true the blade).  I use it for a number of little jobs in the shop... but I wouldn't classify it as a fingerplane.

2) Fingerboards and bridges are not in that group of little jobs.  I use an old Craftsman knuckle cap block plane for bridges (and a ton of other stuff; They'll bury me with that plane Nick) and an old Stanley block plane with a very slightly modified (very slightly longitudinally convex) sole and a Hock blade for fingerboards.  I can go right from plane to paper with it.  Julian will probably be disappointed that, although I have them, I rarely use a jig for bridges.  :)

I suspect you never will disappoint me, Jeff.  Of course, now that I've said that, I can expect some response proving otherwise at Oberlin...those of us relatively new to the trade still use some of what we were taught in school when it comes to jigs.

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17 hours ago, Conor Russell said:

For  violin  fingerboards, and thicknessing ribs,  I have a Lee neilson 102.

Recently  I made a high speed  steel iron  for it from a Starrett red stripe  hacksaw  blade.

After using the powdered metal bridge-cutting knife from John Schmidt, I'll probably never go back to high speed steel, unless there is no other choice.

Jeffrey;

Mark and I have beat on this knife a bit, and I have it here.  Would you like to be next?

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2 minutes ago, Julian Cossmann Cooke said:

...those of us relatively new to the trade still use some of what we were taught in school when it comes to jigs.

As well you should.  We'll see what happens as my joints age.  I may have to dig those jigs out of my drawer!

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18 minutes ago, Julian Cossmann Cooke said:

I suspect you never will disappoint me, Jeff.  Of course, now that I've said that, I can expect some response proving otherwise at Oberlin...

Isn't that some of the fun at Oberlin? Thinking (and sometimes acting) a little "outside of the box"? :)

Jeffrey and I are under standard Oberlin College teacher contracts which limit that, but we do have a lot of fun with participants who are not under the same constraints.

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well thank you all for your answers and suggestions

nobody really answered my question ie does the screw of this plane(pocket veritas) work well.? I bought the miniature veritas, which was not meant to be used true but just looked at ,  but nevertheless works if you add a piece of wood to tighten the screw in place. since the new pocket plane has the same fastening system I was wondering wether for this plane you can tighten the blade less than every minute. 

I like the ergonomic shape, I like that it is lighter than the stanley 102 or 61/2 or than the low anglel veritas, I like that is is shorter too, 

so thanks I think I will be having a new plane soon......

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12 minutes ago, tartarine said:

nobody really answered my question ie does the screw of this plane(pocket veritas) work well.?

The thumb screw?  It works just fine for me so far.  I tighten it snug after I sharpen and adjust the blade and pretty much forget it.  Again, I have the stainless version (I think it's the anniversary model?). I don't think that would make much difference, but who knows.

LinK:

Stainless Version

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