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stephanie4

Old German Violin

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Hallo,

I recently bought this old German violin which has an excellent sound. It is an Amati model. It looks like a work of Mittenwald. I would like to know something more about the construction age, whether it is a violin made by a master violin maker or if it is perhaps a good factory violin, but built by several people who worked to a specific part of the violin.


The dimensions are:
- Body length: cm. 35.5;
- Body width: cm. 20.2 (lower) - cm. 16.3 (central) - cm. 10.8 (higher);
-Length of the handle: cm. 13.2;
-Diapason: cm. 19.5;
- Length of the vibrating string: cm. 32.6;
- Length of the violin: cm. 58.5.


The label is: "Georg Klotz in Mitten // wald an der Iser 17__"


I don't think it's an original Klotz, but could it be from his school and his age?


Thank you all for the answers.

Sorry for my bad English.

Best regards,

Stephanie

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4 hours ago, stephanie4 said:

I don't think it's an original Klotz, but could it be from his school and his age?

 

I think its from that era. Many dealers would probably call this a George Klotz or at least Klotz school, and it might be. But others are more conservative when it comes to these things.

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29 minutes ago, deans said:

But others are more conservative when it comes to these things.

Yes, this looks IMO more like an early Verleger violin mde for the trade maybe ca. 1800; quality of workmanship and varnish are quite different from a Georg Kloz or any other top Mittenwald maker. It#s also a stretch to call it an Amati model, more the isiosyncratic local Mittenwald model.

Nonetheless a nice and well preserved old violin, I'm wondering a bit if the varnish is original everywhere.

To be sure, the OP can check the Mittenwald features, mentioned here

 

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Just a thought, I would not have called a violin from around 1800 "Verleger". But then again its not my terminology. Is there a date cuttoff? Normally think of later 19th century N&H type instruments when this term is used.

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The "Verlegerwesen" =distributor, wholesaler - started "officially" with Mathias Neuner in the 1780/90ies, but there were several others marketing the instruments made by others. Of couse it wasn't the same way as later in the 19th, when the Verleger supplied every homeworker with wood, tools etc., but around 1800 the organization and division of labour was broadly advanced. One can read all this in the PDF essays from the Mittenwald Geigenbaumuseum, unfortunately in German only.

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Thank you for all the answers. The seller told me that - for him - it is a Klotz school or at least a work by Mittenwald around 1770. The last two digits of the date on the label are not legible. There is no cut, I just don't read anything, I think because of the age. I bought the violin for the sound, without giving importance to the origin. In the Mittenwald violin museum I saw two violins that looked quite similar, referred to a "Mittenwalder Arbeit" from the second half of the 18th century (like almost all the violins of that age it is not possible to know the author). Even the purfling, less precise than that of the Sabastien / Carol / Georg Klotz, resembled mine. Compared to the Klotz, the notches as a form or decoration to the inside of the peg boxes, often (may be not always) present in the Klotz violins, are also missing. I am not expert and I do not know exactly when the production began for the Verlegers in Mittenwald. The PDF of the Mittenwald Geigenbaumuseum says that the development and expansion of violin construction in Mittenwald has grown a lot through the Verlagsträger at the beginning of the 19th century. In the book by Herbert Meider - Franz Stoltefaut "Mittenwalder Geigenbau", which I purchased at the museum, it is written that mass production begins in the years after 1810 by the two companies Neuner and Baader. For this reason I would be curious to know if it could be a less famous luthier who built the instrument from the beginning to the end (may be for a Verleger?), or a work by many workers, who nevertheless produced a violin with an excellent sound.
 
Thank you very much and best regards,
 
Stephanie
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

Edited by stephanie4

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