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MacDuncan

Old German Guarnerius Copy?

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Hello all,

I'll be taking a look at an interesting old violin soon, and wanted to poll the knowledgeable folks of this forum regarding said fiddle.  It's advertised as a mid-1800s German copy of a 1715 Joseph Guarnerius violin.  This assessment was given by a well known local luthier, and the current owner knew the previous owner, who has long since passed away (old German gentleman, apparently this fiddle was his father's before him).  It's interesting to me based on the metal plaque on the back, the varnish, and the wood/construction.

I've attached some pictures in hopes that people might share some insights or observations.  Has anyone come across such a fiddle before?  Sorry for the poor pictures, they're not my own and I don't have this instrument in my posession.

Thanks very much!

jg1.jpg

jg2.jpg

jg3.jpg

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jg5.jpg

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Interesting that the local luthier said it was a copy of a 1715 Guarneri. 1715 would be one of the earliest in existence, and I imagine very few people will ever have seen one so early, probably only the top experts in the world.

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38 minutes ago, Wood Butcher said:

Interesting that the local luthier said it was a copy of a 1715 Guarneri. 1715 would be one of the earliest in existence, and I imagine very few people will ever have seen one so early, probably only the top experts in the world.

A 1715 Josef Guarneri would be regarded as a Filius Andreae, no matter if his son Giuseppe Bartolomeo had a hand in it.

The said fiddle looks like a late 19th Bohemian mass produced violin copying nothing, with the varnish stripped off for a good part and a dreadfully glued soundpost crack in the back, not to mention the home made pegs and the odd bridge; I'm doubting that anybody can see the metal plate as an improvement nor the metal nail fixing (or weakening) the probably amateurish replaced neck. Nobody should dare to ask any money for it.

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2 hours ago, Blank face said:

A 1715 Josef Guarneri would be regarded as a Filius Andreae, no matter if his son Giuseppe Bartolomeo had a hand in it.

The said fiddle looks like a late 19th Bohemian mass produced violin copying nothing, with the varnish stripped off for a good part and a dreadfully glued soundpost crack in the back, not to mention the home made pegs and the odd bridge; I'm doubting that anybody can see the metal plate as an improvement nor the metal nail fixing (or weakening) the probably amateurish replaced neck. Nobody should dare to ask any money for it.

Not to mention the button repair.

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The only feature causing me to take a second look is that there seems to be a pin halfcut by the purfling under the button nail. But the rib corners, edgework or 6 o'clock scroll (if original) are pointing to Bohemia.

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Thanks very much for the insights, guys.  Very interesting!  It looks in rough condition, for sure, but the age and some of the features seemed intriguing to me.  Would love to find out more on the history and origin of this instrument, if it is indeed a complete write-off from a playability/sound perspective.

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