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outofnames

I.D. my bow? (It's not Dodd)

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Wondering if the experts could provide any insight on my bow.  I picked it up last year when mine was being rehaired and luthier lent it to me.  It's quite light at ~56 grams and I love how it's balanced.  Luthier didn't know much about it other than "It's not Dodd" and the tip was cracked and repaired.  The DODD letters are really worn down.

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The stick looks like Markneukirchen work to me, probably early 20th century.

The frog is most likely from something else as it's rather narrower than the stick, but also looks German overall. The button looks like it might belong to either the frog or the stick, but also German.

There seems to be a great deal of wear to the nipple/screwhole, and on a better bow I would recommend getting that bushed.

Actuallylooking again, maybe the frog fits but is rolling on the stick because it's not tight - it definitely seems to be in a different place in the first photo compared to the subsequent shots ...

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It wasn't tight when I took the photos.   Luthier thought it could be German but was guessing.  My teacher's only comment was that it looked old.

Without a doubt, this bow improved my playing the moment I picked it up.   The balance is wonderful for me.  It felt like a bargain at less than a grand.

Edited by outofnames

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Looks like a nice silver mounted bow, a bit difficult to identify. The head with the broad and well defined chamfers looks interesting. But from the photos most probably Markneukirchen around 1900 or a bit later IMO. A look at the metal slide to see if it's screwed or pinned could give some more clues, the form and place of the mortice, too.

Beside the button end there seems to be a gap at the ferrule which should be fixed (soldered) before getting more problematic.

 

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It looks as if the eyelet just needs to be screwed one or two turns deeper into the slide only to make the frog sit close at the stick.

I've had or seen some of this broad chamfered silver mounted German bows before, all having a Dodd stamp, and found them a bit similar to the bows sold and branded by the Weichold shop. Could be from the same source which I failed to identify yet.

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On 11/17/2019 at 4:50 AM, Blank face said:

It looks as if the eyelet just needs to be screwed one or two turns deeper into the slide only to make the frog sit close at the stick.

I've had or seen some of this broad chamfered silver mounted German bows before, all having a Dodd stamp, and found them a bit similar to the bows sold and branded by the Weichold shop. Could be from the same source which I failed to identify yet.

Blank face,

If you don't mind me asking, how are you able to discern between silver and nickle from the photos?  Is it simply experience from looking at so many bows?  I saw on another recent bow thread you indicated the bow fittings were nickle rather than silver.  I obviously have no experience identifying these things and so I ask out of curiosity. 

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5 hours ago, outofnames said:

If you don't mind me asking, how are you able to discern between silver and nickle from the photos? 

It can be difficult from photos, but if it has a dull appearance with green tarnish it's usually nickel. At yours the metal looks more whitish with rests of black tarnishing, so this would indicate silver. When the metal is highly polished or the photos are too much exposured or processed it would be more difficult or impossible.

There are a few other signs at antique bows, for example is silver softer than nickel and features different wear patterns, but this can be deceptive.

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On 11/28/2019 at 2:00 PM, Blank face said:

It can be difficult from photos, but if it has a dull appearance with green tarnish it's usually nickel. At yours the metal looks more whitish with rests of black tarnishing, so this would indicate silver. When the metal is highly polished or the photos are too much exposured or processed it would be more difficult or impossible.

There are a few other signs at antique bows, for example is silver softer than nickel and features different wear patterns, but this can be deceptive.

Hi Blank face,

I had intended to follow this up and then promptly forgot. 

Your assessment that the fittings are silver?  Spot on.  I swiped a silver polishing cloth from daughter's flute case and tried it on the streaks you thought were tarnish. 

They were.  After 10 minutes of gentle polishing, the fittings gleam.  

I'm not sure if the metal winding of the grip is silver wire or not as there were no obvious streaks that I could rub.  

And I think I already mentioned that my luthier thought it was German, so the folks that called German agree with my luthier.  You guys are good for just looking at a few photos online.  :)

You mentioned you'd seen other bows like mine?  As a data point, mine is quite light, very flexible, and feels delicate and nimble when I play.

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5 hours ago, outofnames said:

You mentioned you'd seen other bows like mine?  As a data point, mine is quite light, very flexible, and feels delicate and nimble when I play.

Weight and flexibility can be quite different at this bows. I'm assuming that this model was made by different shops, there were so many that it's always nothing more than blind guessing to put a name on it.

Here's a Dodd branded example with a slightly different frog, no "little heel". Was rather light weighted, too, when I recall it correctly.

 

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