scordatura

Sam Zygmuntowicz NYC Arts Profile Short Film

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This expose on Sam Z recently was shown again on my local PBS station. It is from 2017. I decided to take some screen shots of his notes on two violins. I found this pretty interesting.  One thing that caught my eye was calcium oxide then "sauce". Also tap tone pitches in areas of the plates. Corpus and plate weights, etc. He also is using finger planes on an assembled corpus on the outside. Hmm...

https://www.nyc-arts.org/showclips/143081/nyc-arts-profile-samuel-zygmuntowicz

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Screen_Shot_2019-11-08_at_5_54.36_PM.png

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3 hours ago, jezzupe said:

Hmm, I feel kinda dirty looking at those pictures :o

 

I know. I thought "I spy with my little eyes". He did open "the book" on camera. Sam  Z. Is a good man. Glad to see that once in a while good guys finish first.

 

 

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On 11/8/2019 at 3:00 PM, scordatura said:

Also tap tone pitches in areas of the plates. Corpus and plate weights, etc. He also is using finger planes on an assembled corpus on the outside. Hmm...

Hmm is right.  I don't understand Sam's method from looking at the video.  Carving and tapping free plates, and finger planing the white body without the neck (or maybe the body carving is done first, then plates removed to hollow them?).  I'll have to ask him about that next time I see him.  Anybody know?

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I am sitting at a table with Mr. Sam Z. Right now in Dallas (really!)

wish you all were here(some of you are!)

DLB

I was talking with him sitting in the sun looking at some Guarneri violins and showing off pictures of our dogs. He is a very pleasant and gracious person . It was a privilege to meet him.

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I'm not a violin maker, just a humble player and lover of the violin.

Are these thicknesses considered normal or on the very thin side.

Will such a violin survive for at least another 200 years and still sound great.

 

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1 hour ago, kyproset said:

I'm not a violin maker, just a humble player and lover of the violin.

Are these thicknesses considered normal or on the very thin side.

Will such a violin survive for at least another 200 years and still sound great.

 

They're pretty much "standard" thicknesses.

"I Segreti di Sam" must lie elsewhere....:ph34r:

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8 minutes ago, JohnCockburn said:

They're pretty much "standard" thicknesses.

"I Segreti di Sam" must lie elsewhere....:ph34r:

You edited your local vernacular while I was looking up "bog standard".  I like the phrase.  Do you know it's origin?  

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Just now, Jim Bress said:

You edited your local vernacular while I was looking up "bog standard".  I like the phrase.  Do you know it's origin?  

 I edited it because I thought "bog standard" might not be understood by non-UK people, and also might be interpreted as a bit pejorative (which wasn't my intention) :)

No idea of the origin, but it's in fairly common use in the UK. 

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17 minutes ago, Jim Bress said:

You edited your local vernacular while I was looking up "bog standard".  I like the phrase.  Do you know it's origin?  

One theory is that it is a corruption of 'box standard' – as opposed to 'box deluxe'. Used to describe the contents. I seem to remember that fireworks might be involved.

Andrew

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3 hours ago, Alessandro Peiretti said:

Which effects of calcium oxide (and not hydroxide) on wood? Is it quicklime?. Sacconi would talk of "ossification" but I have some doubts about its caustic power...

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Calcium Oxide is quicklime. It would not exist as the oxide for very long in open air, as it would react with atmospheric moisture to form hydroxide, and then with atmospheric CO2 to form CaCO3 (chalk, calcite, limestone). If it was applied as a water solution or paste, it would already be converted to the hydroxide.

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