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Rue

Pewter in the Purfling

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How common was it to have a pewter strip in the purfling? Why did they do it - shiny appearance? Wouldn't it add appreciable weight to the instrument? Has anyone seen a real life example? Does it age well?

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I had read The Strad article (hence my questions) - I will read the other! :)

Edited by Rue
...missing letters...>:(

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Well - pewter was "new and highly prized".

If that's all there was to it...

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I can't say that I have seen any other instrument other than this one cello. Doesn't mean that there aren't more, but it doesn't seem to have been a big thing.

The cello was at David Kerr's when I saw it and Janet was making the purfling. It was cool.

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There is a group of French makers in the 1650-1670 period that habitually used what I assume to be silver wire in purfling and inlays, including rather prettily twisting it into braids. Dumensil is one of the makers in mind, and they in turn sold pochettes to Joachim Tielke in Hamburg, so there is a bit of an extended relationship there. Metal inlays of this sort exist in quite a lot of decorative furniture of the period - Augsburg makers typically combined metal inlays with ebony for small cabinets and similar things, so it is no surprise to see it emerge here and there in instrument making. I think Bruce Carlson pointed out a Rugeri with pewter a while back. 
 

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Thank you! I'm finding this rather fascinating.

When did "we" decide what the go-to should be? Not that pewter/silver purfling makes obvious sense, but someone obviously thought it was a good idea - that never took off. Purely a short-lived novelty?

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2 hours ago, Rue said:

Thank you! I'm finding this rather fascinating.

When did "we" decide what the go-to should be? Not that pewter/silver purfling makes obvious sense, but someone obviously thought it was a good idea - that never took off. Purely a short-lived novelty?

In my experience it requires multi media skills in that you must know a thing or two about metalwork aside from woodwork

It adds a MASSIVE amount of extra work/time and requires a massive amount of extra hand skills as that relates to free hand knife work, you may be able to rig some jig that will cut outer edge purflng channels as many use, but the stuff in the middle is all free hand and allows for ZERO mistakes and has zero tolerance for "fillers" that one may get away with when using wood.

If one considers that amount of time it takes to hand carve an arched back and then to think that you will then perform a decorative feat of carving on the back that could go south and ruin the entire thing just for "decorations"  and then to think that no one except that "one guy" out there in the world would really want to pay any extra for such things, it really turns into a kind of thing that not many would be willing to bother with doing. Things like my guitar get built one of two ways , 1. either some guy is has a "vision" and wants you to make it happen and is willing to pay for it, or 2. some one such as myself who is a little nutty and has the skills and time to spend 3 weeks on inlaying Brass purfling, does it simply because I wanted to. When things don't make much economical sense they don't get done generally.

I guess there is number 3 now, and thats someone  that has a great cad system set up to do inlay carving 

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