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BassClef

Contemporary Violin & Bow Makers Exhibition - Julie Reed - October 18-20, 2019 - Photos

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18 hours ago, augustulus said:

Anyone's thoughts on Eduard Miller's violin this year? I remember his violin in last year's exhibition was highly praised.

I also noticed more instruments are varnished new, or have less antiquing than previous years. Wonder if this change is driven by the market or the makers.

Yes it was a very nice instrument. Different from the one from last year. The one from this year had a slab cut back. Both were GDG inspired. I found it to be one of the best.

It was a bit difficult for me to really evaluate the sound of the instruments this year as there were periods that it was very busy (noisy). They also had more rooms to try instruments so when I wanted to go back to some instruments, they were gone.

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1 hour ago, scordatura said:

Yes it was a very nice instrument. Different from the one from last year. The one from this year had a slab cut back. Both were GDG inspired. I found it to be one of the best.

It was a bit difficult for me to really evaluate the sound of the instruments this year as there were periods that it was very busy (noisy). They also had more rooms to try instruments so when I wanted to go back to some instruments, they were gone.

Yeah, it somehow feels a bit busier than last year. Yes, I too really like the playerbility of his instruments, both this year and last year.

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12 hours ago, Ken_N said:

I also noticed that too.  But I also noticed most of even the straight up varnish jobs had A LOT of texture.   Not just like Joe Curtain's who has the David Burgess look on the back, (who was first?), but more like bumpy.   I don't think that I've ever noticed that before.  Almost like, "Here it is; take it or leave it."  

I noticed some of the textures too. I kinda like it, it gives the violin a bit more extra character.

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25 minutes ago, Marty Kasprzyk said:

How are the makers selected to participate?

I'm guessing there are more than one way to participate. Renowned makers may be invited to participate, new and up coming makers might indicate their interest to participate and send samples of their works for a 'screening' prior to the exhibition.

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On 10/26/2019 at 1:55 AM, augustulus said:

Anyone's thoughts on Eduard Miller's violin this year? I remember his violin in last year's exhibition was highly praised.

I also noticed more instruments are varnished new, or have less antiquing than previous years. Wonder if this change is driven by the market or the makers.

I think there are two things going on.

1. Most makers have always told me that they would prefer to fully varnish, if the market and their clients will accept it. (Not that it's necessarily easy to do a good-looking fully varnished fiddle.)

2. At one time, antiquing was a way to set your work apart from the crowd, and make it distinctive. But it is so common now, with even many (most?) inexpensive factory instruments being antiqued (and some of them not badly at all), that antiquing almost makes ones violins more ordinary than distinctive.

22 hours ago, Ken_N said:

I also noticed that too.  But I also noticed most of even the straight up varnish jobs had A LOT of texture.   Not just like Joe Curtain's who has the David Burgess look on the back, (who was first?), but more like bumpy.   I don't think that I've ever noticed that before.  Almost like, "Here it is; take it or leave it."  

This has come from rising awareness that Cremonese instruments of the 16 and 17-hundreds were not originally smooth and shiny. They got that way from the high spots becoming worn down,  from excessive application of smoothing overcoats of varnish (polishing), and from repairs. Maintaining or mimicking the original texture in a repaired or retouched area is no easy task, being one of the most challenging things in high-level repair and restoration.

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38 minutes ago, David Burgess said:

I think there are two things going on.

1. Most makers have always told me that they would prefer to fully varnish, if the market and their clients will accept it. (Not that it's necessarily easy to do a good-looking fully varnished fiddle.)

2. At one time, antiquing was a way to set your work apart from the crowd, and make it distinctive. But it is so common now, with even many (most?) inexpensive factory instruments being antiqued (and some of them not badly at all), that antiquing almost makes ones violins more ordinary than distinctive.

If I may add, your observations are correct for the American market. 

In east Asia antiqued violins never really could attract the majority of customers. Here actually I can observe only recently a trend which goes more for antiqued instruments. Some prominent Japanese makers all of a sudden are showing copies of famed fiddles. 

I think market force is stronger than makers own decision for the appearance of his/her instruments. Indeed I am currently in exact this situation where a customer first ordered an antiqued fiddle but then after a short discussion I changed the plan on the demands of my client to a Guarneri Del Gesu in the style of Giuseppe Ornati. (As strange as this might sound)

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On 10/26/2019 at 8:25 AM, Ken_N said:

Not just like Joe Curtain's who has the David Burgess look on the back, (who was first?), but more like bumpy.

I remember having a Burgess out for trial quite a few years ago that had an amazing amount of rippling in the back. It was a crazy amount of height variation from the flames. It was like a washboard! Pretty cool actually. I also remember hardly any if any scroll fluting on the sides.

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9 hours ago, David Burgess said:

I think there are two things going on.

1. Most makers have always told me that they would prefer to fully varnish, if the market and their clients will accept it. (Not that it's necessarily easy to do a good-looking fully varnished fiddle.)

2. At one time, antiquing was a way to set your work apart from the crowd, and make it distinctive. But it is so common now, with even many (most?) inexpensive factory instruments being antiqued (and some of them not badly at all), that antiquing almost makes ones violins more ordinary than distinctive.

This has come from rising awareness that Cremonese instruments of the 16 and 17-hundreds were not originally smooth and shiny. They got that way from the high spots becoming worn down,  from excessive application of smoothing overcoats of varnish (polishing), and from repairs. Maintaining or mimicking the original texture in a repaired or retouched area is no easy task, being one of the most challenging things in high-level repair and restoration.

What makes you think old Cremonese instruments were not shiny when new....I bet they were!

Most 'antiqued' making I see these days seems to be influenced by what other antiquing makers are doing rather than observations of old instruments held in the hand.

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12 hours ago, David Burgess said:

This has come from rising awareness that Cremonese instruments of the 16 and 17-hundreds were not originally smooth and shiny.

 

2 hours ago, Melvin Goldsmith said:

What makes you think old Cremonese instruments were not shiny when new....I bet they were!

Maybe so. Do you think they were both smooth and shiny?

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On 10/27/2019 at 1:53 PM, scordatura said:

I remember having a Burgess out for trial quite a few years ago that had an amazing amount of rippling in the back. It was a crazy amount of height variation from the flames. It was like a washboard! Pretty cool actually. I also remember hardly any if any scroll fluting on the sides.

Does the maker himself have a photo to share of this height variation from flames? I’d like to see that.

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2 hours ago, BassClef said:

Does the maker himself have a photo to share of this height variation from flames? I’d like to see that.

He has been spotted on MN. I don't know if this violin was an outlier but it would have been circa 1986-89. It was crazy rippled. Never seen anything close. Amazing what a scraper can do when it is allowed to scrape with the flames vs. across. This maker rarely responds to my posts. Not sure if that is good or bad.

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On 10/27/2019 at 10:56 PM, David Burgess said:

 

Maybe so. Do you think they were both smooth and shiny?

Not smooth but certainly shiny. I think age quite quickly  took the shine off the pristine examples we see ( Messie is heavily French polished) 

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20 hours ago, BassClef said:

Can anyone identify any instruments in the lot that were copies of other specific historic instruments?

i went with a friend who is a luthier, he was able to identify the dederer as guarneri model i believe, i have to ask him again 

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