Sign in to follow this  
zdalton13

Cleats for top seam

Recommended Posts

While thicknessing my top plate, I noticed if I hold the plate up to the light I can see a tiny bit of light peeking through the center seam near the top. I can't notice a gap when looking at the plate just by eye though. I am thinking about adding cleats running the length of the center seam. Would this be sufficient or should I do something else instead?

 

20191017_205235.thumb.jpg.56baaf9f75f1435988e652263bde946c.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can you close the gap with light hand pressure? If so, I'd get some glue in there with a thin flexible knife or piece of steel/plastic/wood and clamp it shut. It's a good thing that the gap is under the fingerboard, as gluing now can introduce ghosting later on. 

Cleats certainly won't hurt, but only after you've glued it. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You can add a strip of parchment along the center strip in the area you see light through. This will make the cleats unnecessary.

Basically it is a parchment crack repair, that reinforces the area without the added density of cleats.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
30 minutes ago, Fiddlemaker5224 said:

You can add a strip of parchment along the center strip in the area you see light through. This will make the cleats unnecessary.

Basically it is a parchment crack repair, that reinforces the area without the added density of cleats.

Interesting. Is this considered as strong as cleats? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, zdalton13 said:

Interesting. Is this considered as strong as cleats? 

No, and can cause buzzing besides.

 How long is the gap in the joint? Cleats are cheap insurance on any joint and seem to have no effect on sound. If the gap is really short you can use a some what wider cleat covering the gap and then regularly spaced cleats along the rest of the joint. Be careful to position the cleats so that they don't get in the way of fitting the post. Needless to say it is better to find out if your joint is bad while it is still possible to do it over if necessary. If you examine the joint under magnification you should be able to see any suspicious areas and can take a thin shaving across the joint and see if you can separate the shaving at the joint. If you can then the joint  is not tight or the glue is too weak.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, nathan slobodkin said:

No, and can cause buzzing besides.

 How long is the gap in the joint? Cleats are cheap insurance on any joint and seem to have no effect on sound. If the gap is really short you can use a some what wider cleat covering the gap and then regularly spaced cleats along the rest of the joint. Be careful to position the cleats so that they don't get in the way of fitting the post. Needless to say it is better to find out if your joint is bad while it is still possible to do it over if necessary. If you examine the joint under magnification you should be able to see any suspicious areas and can take a thin shaving across the joint and see if you can separate the shaving at the joint. If you can then the joint  is not tight or the glue is too weak.

The length of the gap is about 55mm. As far as I can tell a shaving across the seam tears along the grain and not at the seam. I don't know if this makes any difference, but the plate flexes fine in that area.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, zdalton13 said:

The length of the gap is about 55mm. As far as I can tell a shaving across the seam tears along the grain and not at the seam. I don't know if this makes any difference, but the plate flexes fine in that area.

I really can't see the gap from the photos on my ancient computer. If this was one of my instruments I would probably make another top but if you are a student who is not going to sell the instrument perhaps cleat it, finish it and be more careful with the joint next time. I always check my joints dry with just one clamp at the center using a strong light and magnification to check both sides. Without glue it is easy to see if they are not perfect.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/19/2019 at 1:39 PM, nathan slobodkin said:

I really can't see the gap from the photos on my ancient computer. If this was one of my instruments I would probably make another top but if you are a student who is not going to sell the instrument perhaps cleat it, finish it and be more careful with the joint next time. I always check my joints dry with just one clamp at the center using a strong light and magnification to check both sides. Without glue it is easy to see if they are not perfect.

Zoomed in a bit, or on a good screen, it's easy to see where the light shines through the centre joint in several places.

454537149_gapsinjointzoom.thumb.jpg.bc7d503e221cf8d59b230e90551e88df.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.