PhilipKT

How to photograph a bow to best advantage?

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I ask because I’m about to share some photographs of another a few bows, and I’d prefer not to clutter than thatWell I just posted some pictures of a bow, and I basically just took closeup photographs  of everything I could think of. There is a wonderful guide from our friend Rue regarding photographing instruments, I would love to have an equivalent about optimum bow photographs? I would much rather share five good photos than 15 mediocre ones.

I ask because I’m about to share some photographs of another few bows.

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Though I am not a bow freak I would say as follows:

head and frog from the players side, close up of the chamfer of the head , head from the top and from below (shape of head plate) frog underside and back, close up of the ring from the front, and photos of the frog detached to show the slide and the mortice in the stick, 

makes a 9 photo set. 

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1 hour ago, Andreas Preuss said:

Though I am not a bow freak I would say as follows:

head and frog from the players side, close up of the chamfer of the head , head from the top and from below (shape of head plate) frog underside and back, close up of the ring from the front, and photos of the frog detached to show the slide and the mortice in the stick, 

makes a 9 photo set. 

Thank you! I didn’t take the top of the head, and I don’t know whether you mean the Ferrule, but I think I got everything else.

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32 minutes ago, PhilipKT said:

Thank you! I didn’t take the top of the head, and I don’t know whether you mean the Ferrule, but I think I got everything else.

From the top you see the rim of the head. In some cases like Dominique Peccatte it is not in the center unveiliing a piece of information. 

Yes, I meant the Ferrule (sorry sometimes my English gets a glitch). I think experts look at the thicknesses and the form (flat or high). 

Sometimes close ups of certain details are informative if you are really expert and know what you are looking at. 

I once made a very big close up shot of a Pin in the heel plate of a Sartory and found out just by chance that it was filed because it wasn't round but had a septagonal shape.

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The Grunke bow on German bowmakers give three views of each bow:  1.  A straight-on view of the player's side of the handle end, showing the button, the butt of the stick, the frog and the grip.  2.  A straight-on view of the player's side of the head.  3.  An oblique view of the handle end, showing the end of the button and the pearl slide, the heel plate and the side of the frog.  If you limit yourself to three views, these are probably the most important.  And you would include additional shots for any details of interest. 

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