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Baroque

Sticky varnish

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On 10/17/2019 at 5:30 PM, JacksonMaberry said:

If you're still talking about the 6-night method, you haven't read the paper I posted. In the addendum, Michaelman describes a much faster method of cooking rosin into a base to create rosinates. Please read the linked paper.

Now that you have read Michaelman, you should read a much earlier source, one that Michaelman seems to have been unaware of, judging by his bibliography. It answers your above question by making a resin+oil+turpentine varnish, just like you want, but by substituting a colored rosinate instead of normal rosin. 

From Livache/McIntosh "Varnish Making and Kindred Industries", Vol II:

Oil Varnishes. — Rosinates may be substituted for resins in varnish-making. Coloured rosinates are generally used. Some — like rosinate of copper, which is of a beautiful emerald-green tint — are coloured naturally. The desired shade is imparted to colourless resinates by aniline dyes. Coloured rosinates in the dry state have a fresh appearance, and those used in varnish-making are insoluble in water ; weak acids and alkalies have no action on these resinates, but on the other hand they dissolve very easily in alcohol, spirits of turpentine, benzol, ether and chloroform as well as in melted wax, resins, oils and boiled linseed oil. This facility of solution and their beautiful colour cause them to be greatly used, and they have been advantageously applied upon metal, wood, paper, skin, glass, wax, linoleum and cloth. Preparation of Rosinates. — A rosin soap is made by heating 100 parts of pale rosin with 33 parts of soda crystals in 1,000 parts of water, and adding to the solution cooled to 50° a solution of colour ing matter ; a solution of a metallic salt is then added such as the chloride of magnesia, and the solution is filtered from the insoluble coloured resinate which is well washed and dried at a very gentle heat. The dried product constitutes in reality a true coloured lake. For toys, tin boxes, etc., cheap and quick-drying varnishes are re quired, and in the preparation of these the resins and even common rosin have been replaced by rosinates which dissolve readily in warm linseed oil, and some of these, more especially the resinate of zinc in particular, is very durable. These rosinate varnishes are made by dissolving the rosinate in linseed oil heated to about 120° C. and then diluting with the necessary quantity of spirits of turpentine. The resinates most usually employed are those of lead, zinc, man ganese and lime. A great number of aniline dyes being soluble in solutions of certain rosinates, coloured rosinate varnishes may be made of any desired hue. Fused rosinates are made by heating rosin with metallic oxides (e.g., what is called hardened rosin is made by heating rosin with quick-lime ; the product will dry better if a little manganese be stirred in at the same time).

Thanks, I looked though your material, but I could not find one explanation on how to treat RAW resin, taken straight from the tree, AVOIDING the KOH method completely, and thus, boil it, mix it with oil/or turpentine, and at which temperature, and for how long time. Does anyone know of the method that boils resin+oil together instead of the KOH(or carbonate)+resin method?

 

Thanks

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2 hours ago, Baroque said:

Thanks, I looked though your material, but I could not find one explanation on how to treat RAW resin, taken straight from the tree, AVOIDING the KOH method completely, and thus, boil it, mix it with oil/or turpentine, and at which temperature, and for how long time. Does anyone know of the method that boils resin+oil together instead of the KOH(or carbonate)+resin method?

 

Thanks

Ah, I see I misunderstood you. My apologies. I did not know you were wanting to use the raw exudate, directly from the tree. 

Be advised that raw sap/exudate/resin is a very complex mixture of chemicals, including rosin, turpentine, and a variety of sugars etc. Some types of varnish are made with this, for example with what is called larch turpentine (actually just raw sap from the larch), Strasbourg turpentine (sap from Silver For), and so on, but none of those varnishes to my knowledge include processing all or part of the resin into colored rosinate. 

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