keyboardclass

Nice 'pinched' heel on my through-neck

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I’ve always heard that English violins of that period weren’t made with a through neck, so it‘s either Saxon or Salzkammergut, hard to tell apart. The straight ff give me more a Keffer impression though. The handwritten label could be inserted by a dealer or repairer.

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I have what I believe is a rustic English/Scottish fiddle with a through-neck that I posted here:

Wonky fiddle

That being said, I’m sure it’s something of an aberration for the time period (and I’m open to the possibility that the 1845 inscription was added to a pre-existing instrument).

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One should remember that pre-continental Blockade, the English made their own cheap violins, and afterwards these died out, ‘cos it was much cheaper to buy one from Markneukirchen or Mittenwald (perhaps Brexit will be great for English new making?) and stick a dealer label in. I also have a Cello from Kennedy with a through neck, so these were well at home in the British Isles, so that doesn’t decide anything.

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So the “no through neck” verdict was probably addressed only to the Furber school we discussed at some occasions? 
Nonetheless the OP seems to be too similar to continual making that I would assume an English origin. Worth to mention would be the shape of the scroll, the deep and long notches at the button, long thin corners or the “pinched” heel. If all this can be found at British instruments, too, is beyond my actual informations. So I would look for features like a one piece belly or ribs set into bottom trenches, which would indicate a British maker. I also agree that it looks older than 1840, more close to or even before 1800.

BTW, to push homegrown UK making a Brexit won’t be very helpful IMO, a Trump-alike ban of Chinese products is the only option I can see to reach such an ambitious goal.:ph34r:

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2 hours ago, keyboardclass said:

Could I be right?  There are violins with lower lining but no upper?

I can't remember seeing one. The Salzkammergut makers sometime used no linings at all, which I suppose doesn't stop some tinker inserting some later

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Another clue to origin is that it would have required a tall bridge when new.  You may have noticed the wedge under the finger board - thick by the nut, thin by the body.  Presently an average bridge works fine.  Maybe only the top is English and had not enough arch?  Also definitely no lining on top of ribs but lining at bottom. 

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Yes, it is beech, this would be very unusual for English work.

Linings were often omitted on cheaper work, you can see the back ones through the sound-hole, but you can’t see the upper ones, so they left these out.

I think the new pictures will be of interest to our German members.

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Don’t think that the new photos are adding much, more confirming what was told before: An old but cheap probably Salzkammergut made violin of simple woods. I can not see any evidence that the belly isn’t original, and though necks are moving usually towards the front they can also move in the opposite direction in some cases, or the neck angle was misaligned from the start.

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The use of beech is consistent with my attribution (above) to Salzkammergut, so, by the way is the wobbly painted purfling beneath the button. Beech scrolls can also be seen from Schönbach (on cheap fiddles) but I cant’t remember a beech back from there.

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