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Info request: Robert C. Glier violin


Woodman
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Greetings, all. I'm looking for some general info on a Robert C. Glier violin. Sorry, I've only images of the scroll an the label, but it appears to be a hard-played violin, perhaps a trade offering? Whatever snippets of info you can offer will be appreciated.

Besides the manufacturer's name and city, the only info on the label is: No: 1793 and the date 1893

Besides a few valuations, this is all I have thus far:

Robert C. Glier I  -  Violin maker  -  (1855 – 1924)

Markneukirchen maker who emigrated to the USA 1885. Worked for Wurlitzer before establishing his own shop in Cincinnati.

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32 minutes ago, Three13 said:

The Glier I saw that seemed to be his own work was labeled “Art Violin” if I remember correctly.

That would probably be a Gemunder.

 

I have 3 Glier labeled fiddles in the shop right now. One is a Mirecourt, one is German, and the third is his. The violins that he made seem to almost always be quite large, but remember that since he was fully trained in Germany that his own instruments can be mistaken for a Germanic import. Being made of American wood is part of the equation. That and his large personal model.

The one from his hand has a handwritten label dated 1884, and the 2 others that i see have the same handwritten label. The Mirecourt has the label that you show, no. 230 dated 1888. The third is in a case somewhere in pieces, so no available info on that one. I don't know his numbering system, but it seems to me unlikely that it is a linear-sequential system.

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6 minutes ago, Robb said:

What about the Glier violins with Wurlitzer labels? Is there anyway to tell if he made the violin other than American wood?

Not aside from having sought out enough Glier violins to be able to distinguish what it is without a label. His own work has a definite style that is beyond his German training.

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2 hours ago, duane88 said:

That would probably be a Gemunder.

 

I have 3 Glier labeled fiddles in the shop right now. One is a Mirecourt, one is German, and the third is his. The violins that he made seem to almost always be quite large, but remember that since he was fully trained in Germany that his own instruments can be mistaken for a Germanic import. Being made of American wood is part of the equation. That and his large personal model.

The one from his hand has a handwritten label dated 1884, and the 2 others that i see have the same handwritten label. The Mirecourt has the label that you show, no. 230 dated 1888. The third is in a case somewhere in pieces, so no available info on that one. I don't know his numbering system, but it seems to me unlikely that it is a linear-sequential system.

That is really valuable information, thank you very muchThat is really valuable information, thank you very much. Is his personal label in cursive? I seem to remember seeing one with cursive writing.

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Absolutely, Robb.  Any and all comments about Glier's violins, as well as any comments about anyone else doing the same thing at about the same time.

Import numbers and original pricing would be interesting. "it seems to me unlikely that it is a linear-sequential system."  Unlikely, but how many trade instruments could the shop move in the 1890s? The Depression 0f 1873 was over, and immigration was picking up.

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I have a 1909 Robert Glier Strad model that sounds exceptional to my ears.  
It's an instrument that responds to bow speed rather than pressure and is full of color.  

I've wondered if I happened upon an especially nice sounding Glier. 
Based on the auction prices you wouldn't think his instruments would sound so good. 
 

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  • 2 years later...

Robert C. Glier was born in Germany and immigrated to Northern Kentucky. His son, Robert L. Glier was born in the US. They had a studio together on 4th Street, not far from The Wurlitzer company... and sold violins through the Wurlitzer catalog. Robert C. was the uncle of Reinhold Glier.

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