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duane88

The Bowmakers

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https://thebowmakersfilm.com/bowmakers

I had the pleasure of going to Port Townsend yesterday for the World Premier of a wonderful film, The Bowmakers.  Although it seems like it might only have niche interest, it was a wonderful film profiling Pernambuco, players, bowmakers, and the intricate relationships between them. They visited Thomachot in France, and his daughter, Brazil to see Floriano Schaffer and Vito at Arcos, and a group of bow maker who learned from Charles Espey. Matt Wheling was there and in the movie, and it was a joy both visually and in concept. I encourage you to have a look at the trailer and see if you can't convince your local art house theater to show it. The owner of the Rose Theater, where it premiered is the producer, and it will be shown again at the Port Townsend Film Festival in late September and be back there for a regular run in October.

It was fun. You will like it.

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2 hours ago, MeyerFittings said:

Was Noel there?

 

No. Vito, Selso, Charles, Robert, Ole,Matt,Cody, saw Paul Schuback. Paul Siefried was in the film but was unable to attend. Noel and Kevin figure prominently in the movie but were not there.

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10 hours ago, duane88 said:

https://thebowmakersfilm.com/bowmakers

I had the pleasure of going to Port Townsend yesterday for the World Premier of a wonderful film, The Bowmakers.  Although it seems like it might only have niche interest, it was a wonderful film profiling Pernambuco, players, bowmakers, and the intricate relationships between them. They visited Thomachot in France, and his daughter, Brazil to see Floriano Schaffer and Vito at Arcos, and a group of bow maker who learned from Charles Espey. Matt Wheling was there and in the movie, and it was a joy both visually and in concept. I encourage you to have a look at the trailer and see if you can't convince your local art house theater to show it. The owner of the Rose Theater, where it premiered is the producer, and it will be shown again at the Port Townsend Film Festival in late September and be back there for a regular run in October.

It was fun. You will like it.

A lot of good Bowmakers in that area. Did Paul Siefried show up?

I would definitely buy a ticket to watch it.

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Did they Spell “Mirecourt” incorrectly or is is it “Merecourt” in France?

and I see Paul Siefried in the blurb so I guess that answers that.

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11 minutes ago, StanY said:

Duane, tell the filmmaker to submit this to the Full Frame Documentary Film Festival in Durham NC.  I've inquired but I expect they have to submit it.  Jerry is nearby, I wonder if he knows anyone connected with the festival.

Hello Stan,

 

Please use the contact information on the website to notify the producer/director of this. A bunch of stuff coming from me won't mean nearly as much as requests coming in from lots of interested people in different places.

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13 minutes ago, Zeissica said:

Wow - cool! If it doesn't come around here (Albuquerque) I'll then hope for DVD release at some point. Looks great!

I asked about DVD and he wasn't very open to that right now. They are more interested in wider distribution, so contact your local artsy theater that runs things like this and send them the link to the website.

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Although the subject fascinates me tremendously, I’m not sure it would have enough appeal to actually be marketable to even specialty theaters, however how about contacting public broadcasting? That would be just right up their alley.

I’m really interested in how old is the wood that they have to work with. 

When I sent my first Gillet bow to Paul Childs for papers, He told me it was made around 1960, and the workmanship wasn’t the best, but he extensively complimented the wood. He said it was a superior piece of wood. We didn’t discuss how old that piece of wood might have been in 1960, but it’s an interesting question.

Despite the complaints about workmanship, I prefer that bow to my other Gillet, which is earlier and more cleanly made( and which Childs thought was the better bow.)

I’m very interested in knowing how much “superior wood” is estimated to remain,  And how good is the stuff that is available to modern Bowmakers?

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I'll bet he two stcicks were of similar ages. Wood from the same tree varies in place, cut and quality. Workmanship also varies in terms of year, depression, financial pressure, divorce, desease, and the dreaded "human condition". Good cars get flat tires, and despite the chronicelers of individual makers, no two bows by the same maker are alike or equal even if the wood comes from the same tree.

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1 hour ago, MeyerFittings said:

Ever see him when he was younger? Hell, ever see Me, when I was young.

No. I am too young.

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56 minutes ago, PhilipKT said:

Although the subject fascinates me tremendously, I’m not sure it would have enough appeal to actually be marketable to even specialty theaters,

No, I made that point in my initial post. I thought that it would be the case going into the movie, but I,  and everyone who I spoke with at the after party, thought that it would have greater appeal than just us.

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2 hours ago, duane88 said:

No, I made that point in my initial post. I thought that it would be the case going into the movie, but I,  and everyone who I spoke with at the after party, thought that it would have greater appeal than just us.

I accept that but that realization would only come after seeing it. That’s why I think PBS would be a good choice. Most of the folks who watch PBS would automatically be interested in handcraftmanship, endangered wood, and a classic skill being handed down through generations. I’ve owned Two Siefried bows Two Halligans( he learned from Siefried) a Robert Shallock( who apparently worked in Pt Townsend as well) and I’ve played several Sai Gaos and he’s apparently up there too.

Makes me want to make a special trip. With a lot of my Mad Money, and without my wife, who frowns at the very concept of Mad Money.

Party pooper....

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2 hours ago, MeyerFittings said:

Wait till you see how long That lasts.

 

I never watch commercials a second time, but the current commercials for Supercuts are a perfect blend of humour and nostalgia.

The protagonist says basically exactly the same thing that you just said. Really clever ad campaign ha ha

 

 

Edited by PhilipKT
Added the Ad

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3 hours ago, MeyerFittings said:

I'll bet he two stcicks were of similar ages. Wood from the same tree varies in place, cut and quality. Workmanship also varies in terms of year, depression, financial pressure, divorce, desease, and the dreaded "human condition". Good cars get flat tires, and despite the chronicelers of individual makers, no two bows by the same maker are alike or equal even if the wood comes from the same tree.

That’s an interesting comment, and I understand and agree with everything you said. I wonder, however, if two sticks made into bows approximately 20 years apart would’ve come from the same tree, and I wonder about the wood that the modern guys have.

Do they buy the leftover stock of a deceased Bowmaker? Is there a specific source for bow blanks where everybody gets their planks? An elite version of Howard Core? Do they go right to the lumberyard and hunt for planks? I’m sure those questions are addressed in the film.

A top-quality bow maker with Sartory’s ) or someone like him)leftover stock and some high quality ebony is where I’d be shopping.

Edited by PhilipKT
Typo

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3 hours ago, PhilipKT said:

That’s an interesting comment, and I understand and agree with everything you said. I wonder, however, if two sticks made into bows approximately 20 years apart would’ve come from the same tree, and I wonder about the wood that the modern guys have.

Do they buy the leftover stock of a deceased Bowmaker? Is there a specific source for bow blanks where everybody gets their planks? An elite version of Howard Core? Do they go right to the lumberyard and hunt for planks? I’m sure those questions are addressed in the film.

A top-quality bow maker with Sartory’s ) or someone like him)leftover stock and some high quality ebony is where I’d be shopping.

I was at Josh Henry’s shop a couple of years ago. He showed me how stiffness can vary along the length of a single blank of wood.

He had just cut two sister cello bows from a blank. The head of one bow adjacent to the frog end of the other. At this stage the shafts are identical. It was very apparent that one bow was stiffer near it’s frog end and the sister bow stiffer near it’s head.  With this in mind, it’s easy to see how no two bows are the same. Just as the two bows I took home on trial that day varied both tonaly and in playing characteristics. 

I haven’t seen variation in stiffness along the length of a billet talked about, and it’s a rabbit hole I’ve yet to explore. 

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42 minutes ago, Jim Bress said:

I was at Josh Henry’s shop a couple of years ago. He showed me how stiffness can vary along the length of a single blank of wood.

He had just cut two sister cello bows from a blank. The head of one bow adjacent to the frog end of the other. At this stage the shafts are identical. It was very apparent that one bow was stiffer near it’s frog end and the sister bow stiffer near it’s head.  With this in mind, it’s easy to see how no two bows are the same. Just as the two bows I took home on trial that day varied both tonaly and in playing characteristics. 

I haven’t seen variation in stiffness along the length of a billet talked about, and it’s a rabbit hole I’ve yet to explore. 

 Of course, but the bow maker would have what he wants in mind and would carefully select wood with the characteristics he wants, so presumably he would be able to control the wood he gets so that any variation would be minor. Buying an entire log means you may get a lot of wood you don’t care for, but it also means you have a whole lot of wood to  choose from, and you can decide what you want to use and what you don’t. Choosing from among pre-cut blanks means you can be much more detailed in your selection, but golly that’s a tedious process. The bow maker you mentioned presumably would’ve liked one stick better than the  other and would’ve made that one into a bow and not the other one, unless the difference was irrelevant.

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18 hours ago, duane88 said:

I asked about DVD and he wasn't very open to that right now. They are more interested in wider distribution, so contact your local artsy theater that runs things like this and send them the link to the website.

Hopefully they'll re-consider at some point. I would imagine, as has been pointed out in this thread, that the density of people in any given town that are interested in bowmaking is quite small. But there are hundreds, maybe thousands throughout the world who would buy a DVD if it became available. I have similar DVDs such as "High Fidelity" (about the Guarneri String Quartet) and "God's Fiddler" (about Heifetz) but was never able to see them in theaters. 

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