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JRyn

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At least some of the Jackson Guldan violins were a little like that, although this appears to be much nicer than those. Incidentally, the higher end Guldans were of more conventional construction. Wish the label was more intact. It would be really interesting to know who made it. Any idea of its history?

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On 8/10/2019 at 12:23 PM, stringcheese said:

At least some of the Jackson Guldan violins were a little like that, although this appears to be much nicer than those. Incidentally, the higher end Guldans were of more conventional construction. Wish the label was more intact. It would be really interesting to know who made it. Any idea of its

 

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15 minutes ago, zhiyi_zhang617 said:

Is orthodox appearance or construction equal to American? Any possibility of being English, etc.? I am a little curious of the title.

The back is made of American big leaf maple.

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18 minutes ago, jacobsaunders said:

How do you know that for certain?

Widely spaced grain lines, a distinctive curl. Also big leaf typically has a very common and distinctive defect, which many of us across the pond refer to as "snot marks." Streaks, sometimes dark, about 3 cm long and 2mm wide. 

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28 minutes ago, JRyn said:

Widely spaced grain lines, a distinctive curl. Also big leaf typically has a very common and distinctive defect, which many of us across the pond refer to as "snot marks." Streaks, sometimes dark, about 3 cm long and 2mm wide. 

It looks like a fairly mediocre bit of slightly off slab cut sycamore that could have grown anywhere to me. I didn’t know one recognises Americans by the snot marks! Thanks for the tip

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Haha.  I'll try.  Note how neat the purfling is. Lots of skill shown, like somebody doing it a hundred times a day.  Very right.  But the edges themselves, not remotely classical and you could say wrong.  Edges appear unfinished actually.  Wouldn't you expect a single maker to have everything more equally right or wrong?  For the record, I'm no connoisseur and I don't necessarily know what I'm talking about.

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15 hours ago, Bill Merkel said:

Haha.  I'll try.  Note how neat the purfling is. Lots of skill shown, like somebody doing it a hundred times a day.  Very right.  But the edges themselves, not remotely classical and you could say wrong.  Edges appear unfinished actually.  Wouldn't you expect a single maker to have everything more equally right or wrong?  For the record, I'm no connoisseur and I don't necessarily know what I'm talking about.

Thanks for the clarification Bill. I agree that the varying levels of workmanship strongly suggests that this instrument was made by multiple hands, though I don't know if this disproves it being American (or atleast to an extant, finished in America). 

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If I had the fiddle in my hands it might be obvious it was most likely made by some American and not Euro factory work at all.  Your pictures are decent but it's still hard to tell.  I think that's why ppl are saying it's interesting.  I shouldn't have said anything; it was just my first impression of the pictures.  One thing you can do, you have the city name Altoona, so you could take it to violin shops in that area.  Somebody might have seen them before.

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It looks like the work of a good amateur to me - everything is consistently a bit odd, purfling, edges, scroll symmetry, f-hole placing (very low), model (very long upper bouts), grain orientation on the back, and the linings from what you tell us.

I would expect it to be rather heavy.

Seems quite consistent with some skilled woodworker and amateur maker from Altoona.

 

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