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MinkeyDGreat

Has anyone tried Deja Rosin?

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I have never heard of "Deja Soloist Rosin." all I can find out is it is sold online by Etsy that appears to be a dealership for small business products. I have bought some things through Etsy and that worked out well. My granddaughter sold some handmade crafts of hers through Etsy.

I decided to buy a cake of this rosin, so if you can wait a week for mine to arrive I'll report my opinion here. Or if you have already bought some, please let us know what you think about it.

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Thanks! Will be on stand-by.... 

I haven't bought much from Etsy before. I like the presentation on the page, though, and the claims seem enticing enough to give it a try.

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I TOOK A 2nd LOOK AT DEJA SOLOIST ROSIN 5 DAYS LATER - CHECK MY ADDED COMMENTS IN A LATER POST  (on Sunday, Aug. 11).

My cake of Deja "Soloist" Rosin arrived yesterday.

It is a neat cylindrical cake, of 3/4" thickness and 1.5" diameter a substantial size. It is nicely packaged in an aluminum case that holds the rosin and its attached cloth. I find this case particularly nice because the top is threaded: a much better idea (in my experience) than the friction fit cases that come with "Old Master" or "Baker's" rosins for two reasons

(1) the threading makes the cylinder less likely to deform and

(2) threaded tops go on and off more easily than the friction-fit ones.

The rosin itself is not too soft or too hard (may tend toward the harder end of the usual range)**. I tested it on 3 bows, one each violin, viola, and cello and played on the appropriate instruments. I feel I do not get as much low tone as I get with my usual "Leatherwood (supple)" rosins - but then Deja rosin lists for 1/6 the price Leatherwood (the most expensive rosin I've ever seen). On the other hand I thought I got more higher register output with the Deja rosin and on the cello I got better responsiveness in the higher octaves of the lowest (C) string than any other rosin has given me with this bow.###

I removed what rosin I could from each of the bows with a microfiber cloth before rosining generously with Deja. Then I removed the Deja and re-rosined the bows with the appropriate violin, viola, and cello (supple) "Leatherwood" rosin and played each instrument again immediately after playing it with the Deja rosin. I essentially played a 3 octave scale on each instrument (4 on the cello) and also some "noodling."

It will take me more time to decide how and when to use the Deja rosin.

* *Hard rosin? In the 1960s I bought a cake of Liebenzeller gold I (for violin) and felt it was like trying to rosin my bow on a stone. I never did use it. It was another 30 years before I tried Liebenzeller again - that time grades II, III, and IV - and did use those rosins for about 10 years until Tartini (and later Andrea that replaced it) was marketed. Deja is not that hard.

### The state of my hearing must be taken into account. I wear hearing aids in both ears. Without them I am very hard of hearing. Even with them I do not have a full spectrum of normal hearing.

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For the record, I second what violinnewb said:

3 hours ago, violinnewb said:

That was extremely kind and thoughtful for you to go out and buy the rosin in order to reply to the OP! Much respect Mr. Victor!

Also thanks a bunch for giving such an in-depth testing of the rosin. I think that I have a much better idea of what it is now that you've described it.

 

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I thought some more about my trial of DEJA Rosin the other day and checked the surface of the cake and realized that not much rosin had been removed from the cake when I rosined my bows. So I "scored" the surface of the cake by gently cutting a "square grid" pattern in the surface and tried it again with the same violin and viola bows. The result was a very nice and very rich tone on both instruments.

(Scoring the surface of a new rosin cake is not something I usually (if ever) do. Probably should have tried it with that old Liebenzeller-I cake 50 years ago. I might try that if it's still around.)

I have not tested the DEJA playing qualities for a typical "set" duration of say 2 hours, but based on the short-term result the DEJA ROSIN seems to be a good deal, especially for the price and size of the cake. I will keep playing with it on the bows to see how well it holds up and report more at a later time.

EDIT: I've kept DEJA rosin on the bows the last couple of days and it seems to keep its character very well. I give it 4 stars (out of 5 maximum). It has gotten very hot here in CA the past few days (~100°F) so it's had a pretty good test/

Edited by Andrew Victor

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That's extremely interesting! I never thought about scoring rosin. My teacher once commented about having tried smashing up some chips of rosin in a mortar and pestle to get a really good first application. But he thought the result to be too gritty.

 

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Minkey,

I think it is common practice (by some) when a bow is rehaired and then prerosined by the rehairer, powdered rosin made as you described is applied - often unless the customer specifically requests it not be done. at least that seemed to be the case many years ago when I first had to pay for my own bows to be rehaired. I have always preferred not to have that done, but instead to always do my own initial rosining and know what rosins are on my bows.

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OK - back with more review of DEJA "Soloist" rosin. I now conclude this stuff is quite unique in my experience.

I have long felt that an ideal rosin would have static friction (that pulls (and pushes) the string and thus creates the vibration and sound - the bigger the displacement the louder the sound)  in proportion to the pressure applied to the string by downward force as well as by the speed of the bow and sliding friction (that damps the string vibration during the slip phase) of zero. I feel this rosin comes closer to that than any I have tried in the past 20 years (maybe 70) - it's not something I am equipped to actually measure. So I upgrade it in my estimation from 4 to 5 stars.

I think it will bring out overtones from any instrument very well and this should promote "projection," but I have not tried it in a large hall. On my cellos (and with the 3 bows I tried) it brings out the upper octaves of the C string like no other rosin I have tried.

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