Jump to content
Maestronet Forums

Rehair or Despair?


Three13
 Share

Recommended Posts

4 hours ago, edi malinaric said:

Now for some heresy!

Why not wash the hairs, trim the unsightly broken ends away, give it some rosin and continue using it?

cheers edi

Hair getting dirty is only one sign of worn hair.  The hair stretches with use, and stretches more on the playing side due to players rotating the bow.  A higher tension on the non-playing side not only kills the playability of the bow, it will warp the stick over time.......I do not believe it is heresy, but very unwise.

This bow does look like it is worth the rehair.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 hours ago, Jerry Pasewicz said:

Hair getting dirty is only one sign of worn hair.  The hair stretches with use, and stretches more on the playing side due to players rotating the bow.  A higher tension on the non-playing side not only kills the playability of the bow, it will warp the stick over time.......I do not believe it is heresy, but very unwise.

This bow does look like it is worth the rehair.

Hi Jerry - All agreed. I've seen school bows with almost half the hairs missing?????

Luckily I didn't mention equalising the hair tension with a hot air gun.

:-)

cheers edi

Link to comment
Share on other sites

39 minutes ago, edi malinaric said:

Hi Jerry - All agreed. I've seen school bows with almost half the hairs missing?????

Luckily I didn't mention equalising the hair tension with a hot air gun.

:-)

cheers edi

 

Yes very lucky as equalizing with a hot air gun does not work.  Any shrinking that occurs with heat is very rapidly reversed during use, and equalizing is almost never the best practice.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, Jerry Pasewicz said:

 

Yes very lucky as equalizing with a hot air gun does not work.  Any shrinking that occurs with heat is very rapidly reversed during use, and equalizing is almost never the best practice.

 

Hi Jerry - sorry - the hot air gun was a tongue in cheek comment aimed against myself.

I once tried to camber the stick by clamping it against a carved mould and then heating it in a cardboard box with my hot air gun. I was hoping that heating the stick all the way through would be a way of getting a repeatable camber. It wasn't successful. It was too expensive in time and one still needed to over-bend the stick.

An alcohol flame works much quicker and better.

cheers edi

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, edi malinaric said:

Hi Jerry - sorry - the hot air gun was a tongue in cheek comment aimed against myself.

I once tried to camber the stick by clamping it against a carved mould and then heating it in a cardboard box with my hot air gun. I was hoping that heating the stick all the way through would be a way of getting a repeatable camber. It wasn't successful. It was too expensive in time and one still needed to over-bend the stick.

An alcohol flame works much quicker and better.

cheers edi

Joe Regh does something similar by heating sticks on a pattern in an oven.  He gets camber.......I am not really convinced by it however.

Sorry I missed the humor......

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

13 minutes ago, PhilipKT said:

...What is the black ring on the collar?...

It's a band of black-tarnished silver that contrasts with the surrounding areas of polished silver.  The black tarnish remains because the collar is recessed, while the surrounding areas got polished because they are raised.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

17 minutes ago, Brad Dorsey said:

It's a band of black-tarnished silver that contrasts with the surrounding areas of polished silver.  The black tarnish remains because the collar is recessed, while the surrounding areas got polished because they are raised.

Thanks, I actually like the combination of black and silver. So is that a German bow?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 hours ago, Jerry Pasewicz said:

Joe Regh does something similar by heating sticks on a pattern in an oven.  He gets camber.......I am not really convinced by it however.

Sorry I missed the humor......

 

Hi Jerry - thank you for mentioning Joe Regh. I found his web site and found this article.

https://www.reghviolins.com/publications/2008VSA_bowpaneldiscussion.pdf

In the article he describes what he achieved with forming the camber on a form and through-heating.

My reasoning was almost identical but I may have not taken the temperature high enough. Maybe I should revisit this technique.

cheers edi

Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 hours ago, PhilipKT said:

Thanks, I actually like the combination of black and silver. So is that a German bow?

Interesting things to note while the bow is apart for rehair;

Does the tongue have facets from being cut with a knife, file marks or machine marks? Does the pearl slide measure smaller at the end away from the ferrule? Are there notches showing the slide channel was cut all the way through to the back of the frog? Does cleaning the metal reveal silver or nickel? Is the heel plate one piece wrapping the corner of the frog or two seperate pieces ?

Among others.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've had the bow in question back for a while now, and still have no idea whether it's german or french. I didn't have a chance to look at the tongue, as I didn't do the rehair, but the pearl slide is slightly tapered, the heel plate is one piece, the metal is silver, and the underslide is fastened to the frog with two screws.

Can anyone share some wisdom here?

Thanks.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

18 hours ago, martin swan said:

For me those big pins in combination with the one-piece back/bottom plate say Markneukichen. Likewise the rounded chamfers on the head and the lack of a second cut on the collar of the adjuster.

And the wood, the finish and the general look ...

Thanks - that had been my impression, but a seemingly knowledgeable person played with it, and got all excited about it, so I figured I'd ask.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.



×
×
  • Create New...