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not telling

WaPo article on Mark Womack

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https://beta.washingtonpost.com/health/well-that-was-a-weird-moment-and-other-signs-of-dementia-family-members-should-watch-for/2019/07/12/71fab37a-820c-11e9-bce7-40b4105f7ca0_story.html?outputType=amp

I heard anyone who knew Mark Womack knew about this a long time ago, but wow. He was active as a vm long into his illness. Just goes to show... he was well-known. Talented. Young. His adult daughter contributed to the article...he had to be in his 40's when this began. 

Alzheimer's and this FTD scares me to death, honestly. I always kind of assumed it's less likely to present as an issue for folks who work with their hands or even anyone who regularly thinks three-dimensionally, and I assumed playing music helps protect the brain too. The possibly very wrong idea being, you keep the neurons healthier longer with all of the hand eye coordination. But maybe not? Obviously it's genetic too, and if it's written (in the DNA), it'll happen.  Anyway, I read this with much interest (and much horror) and thought such an article was worth sharing. 

I also find this to be an uncomfortable topic because of my family history, and presumably it's actually probably very unpleasant for anyone to think of, but worth reading the article maybe. I certainly don't expect comments, there's just not that much anyone could say. It's an awful story (even if it's interesting). Is Mark Womack alive and reading this article about himself? 

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38 minutes ago, not telling said:

Alzheimer's and this FTD scares me to death, honestly. I always kind of assumed it's less likely to present as an issue for folks who work with their hands or even anyone who regularly thinks three-dimensionally, and I assumed playing music helps protect the brain too. The possibly very wrong idea being, you keep the neurons healthier longer with all of the hand eye coordination. But maybe not? Obviously it's genetic too, and if it's written (in the DNA), it'll happen.  Anyway, I read this with much interest (and much horror) and thought such an article was worth sharing. 

I also find this to be an uncomfortable topic because of my family history, and presumably it's actually probably very unpleasant for anyone to think of, but worth reading the article maybe. I certainly don't expect comments, there's just not that much anyone could say. It's an awful story (even if it's interesting). Is Mark Womack alive and reading this article about himself? 

I, as well. 

Armin Schlieps was my go-to luthier from graduate school onward (30 years or so)--a brilliant restorer and extraordinarily knowledgeable man who worked for Wurlitzer before he and his father set up shop in Carnegie Hall, ultimately to settle in Seattle where he was an avid sailor. I believe he knew Sibelius. He returned to bow making in his later years, and we bought three from him. We brought one in for rehair, and when I attempted to reclaim it, he looked quite innocently at me and said, "No, no, I do not think this is your bow." We were horrified. His wife explained things (so sadly) and rectified the problem. He was still doing immaculate restorations but had completely lost his memory. (It is interesting to me that these two capacities are apparently separable.) 

Likewise, I watched my father--a professor of biochemistry and college president--slip away into a netherworld. He did not know my name, but called me "the leader" in recognition of the only one of his four children who had raised a family. He referred to my dog as "the good kitty."

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I got the impression that through personality changes and abnormal forgetfulness in other areas of his life, Womack was doing violin making as an in-house pro on Monday, and on Tuesday he had a total breakdown about having forgotten his skillset. It's just a horror story. The years of decline in other areas when one knows that day might be coming, too. Shudder. I don't know details...why he parted ways with Alex Ross in Omaha, or the exact work he did for Lisle. But Alex Ross used to speak of Womack almost reverently ("That bench over there? That was Mark Womack's"; "Mark Womack mentored some of our luthiers"; "We actually have a Mark Womack viola in right now!", etc.)

I'm sorry about your father. I can relate. My mother though, and she was not accomplished in any field, but it would be nice if she recognized my face by now, or even remembered about having a daughter. Actually, she did remember that, but in her head I always stayed a newborn. Whenever I see her (not often) I have to meet her for the first time again and convince her that I am that newborn, but that several years passed in the meantime. It's a routine that is more than unpleasant for everyone. 

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Sad about Mark,

That is happening more and more,,

There's poison everywhere,,the air, the food, the water, I mean dangerous nasty things. The brain is a sensitive instrument, it can get messed up easily,, and the rates of dysfunction are rapidly increasing.

Some people when subjected to cell phone radiation become like vegetables with no motivation what so ever, become extremely forgetful and get suicidal for absolutely no reason. Recovery doesn't happen over night, it can make life tough,,, what if someone doesn't figure out the problem. Misery for years,

Strange times we live in,,,

 

 

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