Sign in to follow this  
xraymymind

Pans for cooking varnish

Recommended Posts

Hello all

i am about to begin to embark on the long road of varnish making. i am going to try the Fulton varnish to begin with.

one question I have for you maestronetters, is what type of pan have you found to be the best for cooking varnishes? Obviously an iron pan could colour the varnish...

Fulton reccomends an enamel pan, but the enamel could melt at high temperatures....so any tips or advice?

thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There were several discussions about varnish pots. Put this in your browser opened to google search:

site:Maestronet.com "varnish pots"

Also  look under "cooking varnish".

I have been using chemically inert Corningware for years with no problems. They are not fragile as some people imagine. Enamel pots can be more fragile because a dent causes flaking. Search eBay for pots.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
42 minutes ago, xraymymind said:

 i am going to try the Fulton varnish to begin with.

I would strongly suggest starting with some other type of varnish, as the Fulton (terpene) varnish has many ways to go disastrously wrong... and in my opinion, even if you are successful, it's not a great varnish.

Does anyone here on MN (or elsewhere) regularly use a terpene varnish?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hargrave’s recipe is not hard and works well. I recommend buying pre-cooked colophony (not burnt) and cooking it further. I used a stainless steel pan, would use iron if it gave extra colour. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I second the Hargrave recipe, not much to go wrong. I make very small batches in a stainless steel sauce pan with a lid i bought for about 2 euro at the second hand store. Even a tiny amount of 50 ml should be enough for 2-3 violins.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 hours ago, Don Noon said:

Does anyone here on MN (or elsewhere) regularly use a terpene varnish?

I have been using it as a ground, one coat, really thin, it is indestructible. 

Make a paste with fumed silica, rub it on, wipe it off well until nothing shows on a rag, rub it with chalk,  rub that off well and the instrument  will look burnished almost and is practically dry at that point. It does need UV to cure though. The instrument will be sealed 100%, then you can put other really dark varnishes  on.

The sealing effect will happen with other oil varnishes too, it is the technique, rather that that particular varnish.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Michael Szyper said:

 Otherwise  the cheapest stainless steel should do the job

I would disagree. Using electric (or flame, but I wouldn't) thin metal will have some very hot spots and  thicker metal will be  considerably more even.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If an electric hot plate is used, one can heat a round bottomed flask on an aluminium block with a suitable indent. Then, a condensor can be attached for consistent results, as less oil will evaporate. For this, I recommend using a little less oil. Also, the more closed nature helps prevent fires. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, DonLeister said:

I would disagree. Using electric (or flame, but I wouldn't) thin metal will have some very hot spots and  thicker metal will be  considerably more even.

Well, for that reason I don’t use stainless steel any more as I wrote. It does not make a big difference if they are expensive or not, the bottom just needs to be thick enough.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/13/2019 at 2:20 PM, Don Noon said:

I would strongly suggest starting with some other type of varnish, as the Fulton (terpene) varnish has many ways to go disastrously wrong... and in my opinion, even if you are successful, it's not a great varnish.

Does anyone here on MN (or elsewhere) regularly use a terpene varnish?

Ditto.

Thanks Don.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On July 14, 31 Heisei at 2:33 AM, xraymymind said:

Hello all

i am about to begin to embark on the long road of varnish making. i am going to try the Fulton varnish to begin with.

one question I have for you maestronetters, is what type of pan have you found to be the best for cooking varnishes? Obviously an iron pan could colour the varnish...

Fulton reccomends an enamel pan, but the enamel could melt at high temperatures....so any tips or advice?

thanks

Varnish makers 300years ago presumably used iron pots the reason why traces of iron are found.

however it is a sort of difficult to find an iron pot nowadays, all are stainless steel anyway.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't know how much iron you'd get into your varnish from the pan, but it doesn't seem like it would be much... and it would be totally uncontrolled.  I'd rather make up some iron rosinate, and add that to the mix.  That seems to make a nice red, and you don't have to be picky about what pot you use.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you use Corningware you want the Pyroceram version of Corningware, not the stoneware version. The internet has info on how to differentiate. Similarly if you are using Pyrex you want the borosilicate version, not the sodalime version https://gizmodo.com/the-pyrex-glass-controversy-that-just-wont-die-1833040962

In the US Lodge has an extensive line of cast iron pans http://www.lodgemfg.com/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Julian Cossmann Cooke said:

Clearly, there are good reasons for these choices in the case of oil varnish.  What about for those of us who inhabit the spirit world?

Borosilicate Erlenmeyer flasks and/or beakers. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/14/2019 at 10:43 PM, Andreas Preuss said:

Varnish makers 300years ago presumably used iron pots the reason why traces of iron are found.

however it is a sort of difficult to find an iron pot nowadays, all are stainless steel anyway.

 

Iron pots? Cast iron pots are relatively easy to find around here; unfortunately they are becoming more in vogue with kitchenistas, so the prices have been driven up. Funny how things have come around full circle.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Enamel will not melt, I have an enamelled old tumble dryer drum that we have used for a fire pit for the last year or so that we have had countless fires in and the enamel still hasn’t melted. The fire looks cool through the holes. 

 

I use pyrex. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, Jim Bress said:

Borosilicate Erlenmeyer flasks and/or beakers. 

Huh.  I have been using aluminum pans from the grocery store.  No doubt there is some deleterious leaching going on or there is an issue with the way they conduct heat?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 minutes ago, Julian Cossmann Cooke said:

Huh.  I have been using aluminum pans from the grocery store.  No doubt there is some deleterious leaching going on or there is an issue with the way they conduct heat?

I use Pyrex glass (Borosilicate) and a heat diffuser to avoid risks, but with the low temperature that is reached with an alcohol varnish (around 80°C) and with an appropriate use of the electric hot plate thermostat I don't think there may be problems.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, finnfinnviolin said:

Enamel will not melt, I have an enamelled old tumble dryer drum that we have used for a fire pit for the last year or so that we have had countless fires in and the enamel still hasn’t melted. The fire looks cool through the holes. 

 

I use pyrex. 

Porcelain enamel is fired way past 1000F. I don't think anyone is cooking varnish that hot.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.