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Pablo Cuevas

Help w fitting the neck

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I’m not sure why you feel the things I said were disrespectful, but I shall refrain from saying anything further. Perhaps the best option is to return to your teacher.

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3 hours ago, jacobsaunders said:

From the 8 billion, quite a few can plane a lump of wood flat

Quite a few is statistically vague. I would reckon that approx.1.5% of the population can do basic household tasks such as regluing a damaged chair. Possibly 0.5% could plane a surface flat, fewer still to violin makers’ standards. 

Whilst I understand the importance of this skill, it is harder to plane the bottom of a neck root flat, as it is a small surface so prone to wobble due to the mass of the scroll around it. 

By all means, a useful skill, but I reckon with_joerg did a serviceable job on his plate-rib surfaces. 

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20 minutes ago, Wood Butcher said:

I’m not sure why you feel the things I said were disrespectful, but I shall refrain from saying anything further. Perhaps the best option is to return to your teacher.

That teacher seems very expensive to little avail. So far, I have had the luck that my teachers/mentors have not charged me for time, though they have for supplies as is only sensible. 

- Do you have any offcuts from the neck? These can be used to rebuild the neck root seamlessly. Alternatively, if the sides of the joint end up a little loose, maple shavings can be wedged in during the gluing. 

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13 hours ago, with_joerg said:

Have you ever met me? Have I asked for your help or for your judgement? Do you not believe that everyone should be met respectfully and helpfully? - I do.

Joerg, I think Jacobs advice was good and well intended, not mean. Learning to plane all sides of a block of wood is such a fundamental and important skill, that many of the violin making schools have students learn to do this well, long before they ever come close to making parts of a violin.

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Joerg,  Here is a picture that explains how scraping the mortise effects the movement of the FB.   It is essentially the opposite of what you want. If you want the fingerboard to go left then you scrape the right side of the mortise. Just keep in mind that the mortise surface must be kept flat. .. that is why I suggest you make yourself a mortise sander.  Eventually you will be able to do it with a very sharp chisel and scrapers.

277952842_neckmortice.jpg.8e26901088c08c6844387f7990f0c435.jpg

 

Take a look at Davide Sora's  video.  This the first of a four part video on setting the neck

 

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Looking at the first photo you posted Joerg the fingerboard is quite a bit out of alignment, which suggest to me that this is more than a small irregularity on the surface of the mortise. I think it is highly unlikely, but are you sure that you have planed the end of the neck square to its long axis. The sides of the neck are not parallel so using a square with shoulders there is not of any use.

 

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Dear Joerg, I believe everyone here is trying to be helpful. Text is often difficult to read or predict how someone will interpret the tone of the conversation. Hang in there, you’ll get it done. 

-Jim 

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6 hours ago, Jim Bress said:

Dear Joerg, I believe everyone here is trying to be helpful. Text is often difficult to read or predict how someone will interpret the tone of the conversation. Hang in there, you’ll get it done. 

-Jim 

Indeed. People have been very generous with help and advice. But not a word of thanks or appreciation from the OP. Only intemperate petulance when he feels that he has been slighted. Poor form, really.

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It is no shame at all to be adviced that there's more practising necessary in the one or other way, especially for a beginner or amateur. More shame to be a beleidigte Leberwurst if the advice isn't what you're expecting. IMO i's more offending to take a lot of money and teach nothing, but this in a friendly manner.

While fitting a neck it's essential to work all glueing surfaces to an exact fit, what is obviously not the case judged by the photos. Especially the bottom heel/button joint should be perfectly flush and straight. There were many good ways to reach this goal shown up here, not only planing,  but they all need a good part of exercise and routine, and possibly continuing instructions.

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20 hours ago, jacobsaunders said:

All things considered, it would be sensible to learn how to plane a piece of wood flat, before trying to make a violin

This really s the crux of the matter.

The end grain surface of the neck and the two sides have to be absolutely, mathematically flat and without twist. The sides can be checked  with a straight edge in both directions and on the bottom  I take one more step by putting the end grain surface on a known flat surface (bandsaw table) and seeing that it cannot be rocked at all in any direction. I do this before sizing the end grain and again after the sizing dries to be absolutely certain. I suggest you fill the mortise in the body ( flat glue joints!) and then remove your finger board from the neck and clean up the surfaces accurately before following the advice above as to taking the mortise down slowly and carefully without allowing any of the five measurements to get very far ahead of the others.

I have a feeling that you need to have a really good look at your plane because if the blade is not absolutely dead sharp and tuned up correctly (search plane tuning) you will have a very tough time especially on the end grain surface.

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I doubt that his problem is about planing a flat surface, but rather the many variables Joerg has to get his head around (and additionally the many advises now). I don't use any planes at all for fitting the neck, just several sharp chisels and a fine rasp and slowly work toward the end goals. Takes me 2-3 hours in zen mode :)

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Thanks everyone for all the good advise I got since I started in  2017. Very much appreciated. I cannot thank you often enough. I hope the 19 instances of "Thank you" that I left since 2017 will express that. For now I go into the future without asking questions.

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1 hour ago, Pablo Cuevas said:

Thanks everyone for all the good advise I got since I started in  2017. Very much appreciated. I cannot thank you often enough. I hope the 19 instances of "Thank you" that I left since 2017 will express that. For now I go into the future without asking questions.

No, Pablo, no!

The day you stop asking questions is the birthday of stupidity.

regards edi

ps - In the late 50s I was studying engineering at the University of Cape Town. Buckminster Fuller visited and gave a talk on his geodesic domes and I was thrilled to hear him. Afterwards he invited questions. Our Prof stepped into the silence and  asked one.

I felt ashamed - even I knew the answer to that one.

Later I mentioned this to the lecturer that I most admired. He looked at me, paused a bit and quietly asked "Maybe you should give some thought to what answer the Prof was looking for".

Wonderful guy - you always came away from him with something extra to think about.

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