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RIP Aaron Rosand

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May you be blessed in the afterlife as you were here on Earth.  

Rosand was one of my go to recording artists when I was in need of "that something else."  

BTW, didn't Mr. Rosand once claim that he was blackballed by Stern?  

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1 hour ago, violinnewb said:

 

BTW, didn't Mr. Rosand once claim that he was blackballed by Stern?  

If you take a moment to watch the film you'll find your answer. It is not uncommon for people in any profession with a great deal of power to be wont to exercise it; Stern apparently was no exception. According to other stories I've heard over the years, it sounds as if it would be in his character, not being the first incident of its kind of which I've heard.
The guys at the top are fully aware that traversing the gradus ad Parnassum is a long and hazardous journey. Presumably, both Zuckerman and Perlman would have made it there on their own, but Stern certainly cleared a path.
Rosand was a great artist, but just as a powerful man can help a career, so can he also hold it back. I'm damn glad he was successful enough to buy a great violin (back in the day when $5,000 was widely thought to be a great deal of money...), and the fact he shared his good fortune with Curtis should warm all our hearts, and make us proud of what we bring to the world of arts.

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5 hours ago, A432 said:

The Stern business was aired on Slipped Disc (classical music news/gossip site) some time ago.

Old news. The ultimate oxymoron.

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16 hours ago, violinnewb said:

May you be blessed in the afterlife as you were here on Earth.  

Rosand was one of my go to recording artists when I was in need of "that something else."  

BTW, didn't Mr. Rosand once claim that he was blackballed by Stern?  

Now at the moment of Rosands funeral, shouldn't we leave the Stern business in the past now?

Aaron Rosand was a great and humble artist who apparently didn't need to hinder anyone else's career to build his own. He was a truely outstanding musician. 

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5 hours ago, Andreas Preuss said:

Now at the moment of Rosands funeral, shouldn't we leave the Stern business in the past now?

 

Do you have no interest in history just because it didn't happen last week?  I see no need for Stern's influence to be forgotten or whitewashed.

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No, of course not. But you could start a separate thread on that particular issue. It's totally valid, but not very peaceful...

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Aaron Rosand was one of my teachers' teacher.  Rosand would regularly call him, ask how he was;  my teacher was his student a very long time ago, may have been one of the first.  From all accounts, not only a fantastic player - a really great clip in the Strad tribute - but a very nice guy, and an incredible teacher.

 

May his memory be a blessing.

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I’m sorry to hear he’s passed, as I consider him a truly great player. He had a great career and a good long life. What a wonderful player and human being.

As to the Stern controversy, Rosand was certainly not the only one to have trouble with Stern, but he was unique in being courageous enough to say anything publicly. I know of several big name players that had the same experience but were too nervous about the potential fallout from making comments, even after Stern’s death. 

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I am sorry for bringing up the Stern controversy.  It was not meant to stir up debate.  It was also not meant to disturb the peace.  

I was in a rush when I posted because I was about to leave my desk.

I brought up the Stern business because I just wanted to bring up how truly honorable Mr. Rosand was in how he overcame diversity and adversity, even among his peers.  Again, I apologize.

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22 hours ago, l33tplaya said:

Aaron Rosand was one of my teachers' teacher.  Rosand would regularly call him, ask how he was;  my teacher was his student a very long time ago, may have been one of the first.  From all accounts, not only a fantastic player - a really great clip in the Strad tribute - but a very nice guy, and an incredible teacher.

 

May his memory be a blessing.

At a masterclass one of my classmates played for R. told him that his playing was good, and now all he had to do was "live right".  My main impression of R.'s playing was that he could play anything at any speed.  His sound was really thick and broad.  He probably would have played Mozart the same way and it probably would have worked.

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Since we're on it, a relevant quotation from Mischa Maisky re. Stern's influence :

When I went to Israel, I played for Zubin Mehta, as all Russian immigrants did at the time. Mehta was very friendly with Piatigorsky and he recommended that I go to him as well. He said, "You have the time and he's not young and he's not healthy. You never know how long he will be around, so go. You will never regret it." And so I went to Piatigorsky and I've never regretted it, though I must confess that my career could have gone in a completely different direction had I listened to Isaac Stern's advice, who told me to go to New York instead of Los Angeles. He said, "You think you've come to the West. I have news for you: this is the Middle East. You have to come to America, where the real musical scene is. You have to learn English. You have to play chamber music, which you never did at the Moscow Conservatory. I will arrange for a scholarship from the America-Israel Cultural Foundation so that you can come to United States for six months and learn English. Then you can listen to and meet people and you can breathe in the atmosphere of the music business. I'll arrange for you to go to the Marlboro Festival for two months in the summer so you can play chamber music with great musicians." Then he said, "Don't misunderstand me, you are a great artist and so on, and of course you have had great teachers, but if you're in the United States you might as well spend a couple of months studying with somebody else so you can get a different perspective." He was implying that I study with Leonard Rose, though he didn't just come right out and say it. Being very naïve, I told him, "It's amazing that you suggest these things because that's exactly what I want to do. Of course I want to go to America and learn English, and I would love to go to the Marlboro Festival, but my dream is to study with Piatigorsky." Mentioning Piatigorsky pretty much blew my chances at a jumpstart in my career from Isaac Stern, since Piatigorsky wasn't part of the Stern circle in New York. Piatigorsky was more associated with Heifetz and the West Coast was like another planet as far as Stern was concerned.

Who knows how my career would have developed had I gone to New York instead? This was right around the time when Jacqueline du Pré had stopped playing and the so-called "Jewish Mafia" was looking for a cellist to get behind. I had just come from Russia and I had played a lot in Israel, so I was a great candidate. Instead, another fantastic cellist who had studied with Leonard Rose started playing with Stern right around this time. His career ended up being transcendent.

 

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Fascinating. Notice how Maisky TWICE references himself as a "great artist", all the while trying to appear to be modest* about it. The only other cellist I can think of with a "transcendent" career would be Yo-Yo. I suppose I could look his teachers up if I had enough interest, but then Rose would be the most obvious candidate. 

* = at least in the relative terms  a professional performer understands the word...

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Well, I looked it up.  Ma studied with Rose in his late teens.  When he was around 9, he was introduced on the Tonight Show by Stern.  Previously he'd played for Kennedy and Eisenhower, and appeared on TV with Leonard Bernstein.

Critics would talk about Stern's occasional out of tune-ness, that you can hear on records.  Interesting thing is now that you can hear Heifetz live on tape, he's not as note perfect as his RCA recordings.  When I heard Stern in recital it was perfect, and very interesting stage presence.

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33 minutes ago, Bill Merkel said:

Critics would talk about Stern's occasional out of tune-ness, that you can hear on records.  Interesting thing is now that you can hear Heifetz live on tape, he's not as note perfect as his RCA recordings.  When I heard Stern in recital it was perfect, and very interesting stage presence.

Tape itself was not a perfect medium; "wow & flutter" plagued tape just as it did on LPs.
Considering Heifetz was active half a century before Stern, I'd suggest that comparing tape and live is inappropriate.

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I never really thought about wow and flutter masquerading as out of tune playing.  Interesting.  Might push it over the minimum limit of perceptibility at least.  But we commonly judge intonation from recordings --  and obviously many recordings sound in tune.  By live on tape I meant figuratively any recording without edits.

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1 hour ago, A432 said:

Toward the end -- 1980s -- the "occasional out of tune-ness" could (and did) extend to entire concerti/recitals.

I heard Stern in concert in the mid-late 1980's.  Considering his age, I was impressed, but definitely a few notes out of tune  and some bow slips.  

My recordings of Heifitz sound really good, but definitely the recordings aren't up to current "close mike" standards.

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