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Varnish sample


tony echavidre
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Nice looking effects. Is your objective repeating Cremonese methods, simulating them, or improving upon them? This question is for everyone on this thread or reading it. The reason I ask this is  that I read mixed signals here and elsewhere. 

I for one want to repeat them. Then, I would hope to improve them. 

This is a lot of wishful thinking on my part. :lol:

BTW, I have no issue with either objective. All I want is to understand the goals behind these great ideas.

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On 8/24/2019 at 9:55 AM, Michael_Molnar said:

Nice looking effects. Is your objective repeating Cremonese methods, simulating them, or improving upon them? 

My objective is a good looking varnish that doesn't negatively affect the tone. And durable so that it doesn't easily chip off in the first few years of service.

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14 minutes ago, Michael_Molnar said:

Thanks for being candid., Ernie. 

Sorry that my question killed this thread.

<_<

Did it? I didn't notice....I applaud all your recent varnish experiments and what you have shared so far...great stuff!

I'm still interested in Tony's dark thick oil...maybe he'll post some more about it.

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I've spent thousands of dollars and hours buying and experimenting with many commercial and homemade varnishes and procedures. As such I have alot of different material at my disposal to use. So depending on what feels right at the moment I can choose to vary the material and processes which is how things go with me when I varnish.

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On 7/21/2019 at 9:35 AM, tony echavidre said:

I just wanted to post these photos to show the dark and thick oil that I am now using.
It is a kind of an oil varnish actualy but doesn't leave any patchiness and burnish very well.

The end grain can still absorb some more, not like a filler that would block this effect.

So it is possible to add a wash of lake pigments onto it to get a more contrasted effect. I actualy like to do that with a thin coat of protein layer in between.

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Nice!

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13 hours ago, David Beard said:

Nice!

Thanks David!

Dear all,

I'm back from my summer holiday and I'm glad to reply on this thread.
To answer some of you about the maple sample, yes it is (almost) like cheating ;) as you can get good result more easely than on spruce, but to me it the first step to have a possible comparison with what we can observe on some great classical italian varnish. Parts of ribs and head are flat so one can reproduce the same degree of absorbtion on the flat sample. But I agree than a carve spruce top will validate the test.

As it is also true for the whole process, I am planning to send a complete set of pictures on the finish on my next instrument, than should be finish in two weeks.

Now about the objective.
During the last years that I have been preparing all different kind of mediums, I always kept in mind that I should work in the similar context than the old crafmen in order to experience what I was dealing with, and how to make things work with the tools and knowledge that they seemed to had.
For instance I find to be rewarding to avoid thermometer and observe the different reactions along the process. But I never cooked on embers! :P Also if you don't have any UV tubes and your varnish coat is still soft at the end of the day, this make you think twice.
Now I find it would be a pity not to use the scientifics datas and sharing experiences that we have today. It is a real plus to perform the varnish skill on every step.

On the next part I will tell more about the curing of oil to make my black oil (concindered as a varnish actually).

Cheers

 
 
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Here we go,

On curing oils,
I always washed my oils first, but after read Tad spurgeon's articles and experienced with different procedures, I started to elaborate my own. That is a wash with a lime solution.
The most important thing to understand is to make water and oil in "intimate contact" for a certain time, in order to have a complete wash of mucilage and to help the oxydation.
So first I mix part of lime with water and leave to decant.
I then mix the water part with the oil and shake well.
It can take a day up to a week to have a clear separations between oil, water, and a mixture of mucilage solution in between.
When ready I put the bottle in the freezer for the night, in order to poor back the unfrozen oil in my copper pan.
I then heat gently for hours to speed up the aging process of the oil.
when cooled I filter, poor the oil in a plastic bottle and leave it outside for months.

This finish oil will aso be used for my varnish cooking.

To make black oil, I cook it at high temp and add a portion of lime.

Cheers

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  • 5 months later...

Dear all,

 

I would like to close this topic by saying that I had great result with my cooked oil on my latest cello.

I will start an other thread on the system that I use to finish my instruments as I propose in my course.

I do not want to make any promotion so I won't talk about that here, but feel free to contact me if you have any questions.

All the best,

Tony

 

 

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  • 1 month later...
On 2/11/2020 at 1:06 PM, tony echavidre said:

Dear all,

 

I would like to close this topic by saying that I had great result with my cooked oil on my latest cello.

I will start an other thread on the system that I use to finish my instruments as I propose in my course.

I do not want to make any promotion so I won't talk about that here, but feel free to contact me if you have any questions.

All the best,

Tony

 

 

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Looks great!

Did you start another thread?

Cheers

 

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