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Opening a violin

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11 hours ago, FoxMitchell said:

I'm no Leonhard, but I coincidentally just got done making a video about this subject...

 

 No intention at all of being offensive, but it seems a fairly rough procedure, too much splinters from the top left on  ribs and blocks.:o

I know, I know, it would take much longer to do a clean job and so a much higher cost, but I wouldn't want to see one of my violin in this state, which is why I offer myself to do these jobs for free on my violins if necessary.

But often those who watch these videos on internet are not able to discern the difference, so then they think that to open any violin it takes just a few moments and a kitchen knife, and I don't think this is very educational.

In the few moments that can be seen in Leonhard's video one senses the difference, he proceeds with a lot more care and caution, but I am sure that you too would use more care with a Del Gesù in your hands, or at least I would like to hope for it .;)

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4 hours ago, Davide Sora said:

 No intention at all of being offensive, but it seems a fairly rough procedure, too much splinters from the top left on  ribs and blocks.:o

Agreed. Using alcohol to remove a top (when necessary) may be much more time consuming initially, but can result in significant time saving when the time involved in removing all the splinters from the ribs, and gluing them back to the top is taken into account. Not to mention that the instruments will be less "repaired".

Another thing I noticed: Were the cracks by the lower block present before the top removal, or did they occur during removal of the top? If they weren't there before, they shouldn't be there after.

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5 hours ago, Davide Sora said:

 No intention at all of being offensive, but it seems a fairly rough procedure, too much splinters from the top left on  ribs and blocks.:o

I know, I know, it would take much longer to do a clean job and so a much higher cost, but I wouldn't want to see one of my violin in this state, which is why I offer myself to do these jobs for free on my violins if necessary.

But often those who watch these videos on internet are not able to discern the difference, so then they think that to open any violin it takes just a few moments and a kitchen knife, and I don't think this is very educational.

In the few moments that can be seen in Leonhard's video one senses the difference, he proceeds with a lot more care and caution, but I am sure that you too would use more care with a Del Gesù in your hands, or at least I would like to hope for it .;)

No offense taken! I'm open to criticism, it's one way of learning things.  :) 

Leonhard also has years of experience over me, if my work seems sloppy it's in part because I haven't reached the level of refinement he has yet.  ;) 

How would you open one of your violins, though? Maybe make a video on it? Your scroll carving videos were tremendously helpful and inspirational when I was carving scrolls!

 

1 hour ago, David Burgess said:

Another thing I noticed: Were the cracks by the lower block present before the top removal, or did they occur during removal of the top? If they weren't there before, they shouldn't be there after.

They were there already.

After I published the video I got thinking I should have made mention of that, but YouTube doesn't let you put annotations anymore and I didn't feel like deleting the video to upload a new one, so I hoped it would be assumed they were there already since at some point I mention open cracks. I'll do better next time!

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1 hour ago, FoxMitchell said:

How would you open one of your violins, though? Maybe make a video on it? Your scroll carving videos were tremendously helpful and inspirational when I was carving scrolls!

I do not consider myself  expert enough in this kind of thing so it is worth making a video.........fortunately, since I would do it only on my violins and to date they didn't need to be open, as far as I know (or at least no one come back in my workshop for such a work).

I leave this task to make an illustrative video to real experts like Mr. Burgess or Mr. Carlson, much more suitable than me to go through  details of how to use an opening knife.;)

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On 7/31/2019 at 7:13 PM, Kae said:

... Florian Leonhard does.... He posted a video on YouTube in which he opened a Del Gesu. He started near the saddle area with a small hammer and a block of wood.

I tried his method when repairing my #3 violin, and the outcome is perfect.  

   

 

 

Kae, hope both of us had some fun in Australia. You live there, but it was high adventure for me. :lol:

On 8/3/2019 at 11:01 AM, Davide Sora said:

 No intention at all of being offensive,

Nor on my part.

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To a large degree removing a top cleanly and without splinters depends more on the person who glued the top than the person removing it. I have removed a few tops on my instruments over the years and been able to pretty much unzip them and put them back on with no more than a swipe of a file over the glue surfaces. On the other extreme I just had to take the top off an instrument which had been glued on with some of the strongest glue I have ever seen, the repair person had used the many splinters from a previous opening to realign the top and then clamped the top so hard that the ribset was indented into the top below the original glueing surface. Not easy to remove and lots of work to do after.

As far as I know alcohol is only useful to dehydrate the glue and allow the two parts to break on the glue line itself so if any one has a procedure which would have helped with the above described situation I would like to know about it.

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2 hours ago, Wood Butcher said:

You can actually see a new crack appear at 6.30 from one end of the bottom nut, and then get longer as the knife is pushed across the block :(

yep. that sometimes happens. you hope that it is an old crack.  edit: I don't let customers watch me open an instrument.

when asking about how to do a repair one must take into account all of the possibilities. A simple example is replacing a tailpiece. Can you set a sound post? When you remove a top, do you have the skills to deal with what happened in the process? Not much fun to be had when someone shows up at the shop with a top off looking for help.

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25 minutes ago, duane88 said:

yep. that sometimes happens. you hope that it is an old crack.  edit: I don't let customers watch me open an instrument.

when asking about how to do a repair one must take into account all of the possibilities. A simple example is replacing a tailpiece. Can you set a sound post? When you remove a top, do you have the skills to deal with what happened in the process? Not much fun to be had when someone shows up at the shop with a top off looking for help.

Perhaps, but it didn’t really need to happen. That top removal looked like a brutal race to the finish line.

I doubt any client would be pleased to find extra cracks in their instrument as a result of trying to repair something else.

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2 hours ago, Wood Butcher said:

You can actually see a new crack appear at 6.30 from one end of the bottom nut, and then get longer as the knife is pushed across the block :(

That was a saddle crack that was already present. It just became really evident and it waved and smiled for the camera when poked.  ;) 

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51 minutes ago, Wood Butcher said:

 

I doubt any client would be pleased to find extra cracks in their instrument as a result of trying to repair something else.

If you know what you are doing, the client won't find any extra cracks in their instrument. 

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