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Rue

Green Violinist - Chagall

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1 minute ago, romberg flat said:

No. He just did it his way. Like all giants did... 

Taste is a strange concept. Each to their own. Maybe he will grow on me.

There are millions of artists whose work we will never know, so I don't feel any urge to eductate myself about the supposed great artists.

I do love this one though

cave art.jpg

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38 minutes ago, romberg flat said:

Believe it or not all the giants of Modern art knew how to draw in realistic way, but did not want to. Thank goodness.

I am the same way with my violin-playing. I could play Bach's Chaconne, Sibelius' Violin Concerto, and the works of Paganini with beauteous ease, but I choose not to and play like crap instead ;)

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1 hour ago, sospiri said:

Call me old fashioned, but I like art by people who actually have good drawing skills.

I'd have to do a bit of research, but I'm pretty sure Chagall had good drawing skills.

While I'm not fond of that particular shade of green, in the first example, I rather like the overall composition. 

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23 minutes ago, sospiri said:

Taste is a strange concept. Each to their own. Maybe he will grow on me.

There are millions of artists whose work we will never know, so I don't feel any urge to eductate myself about the supposed great artists.

I do love this one though

cave art.jpg

Excellent. There is a hope for you. :D

13 minutes ago, B.Ceruti said:

I am the same way with my violin-playing. I could play Bach's Chaconne, Sibelius' Violin Concerto, and the works of Paganini with beauteous ease, but I choose not to and play like crap instead ;)

Excellent. Now you only have to wait and see how people would like it. :)

12 minutes ago, Bill Merkel said:

You can't be a top notch degenerate unless you could do better.

Excellent. The same was what Goebbels thought. ;)

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13 minutes ago, Rue said:

I'd have to do a bit of research, but I'm pretty sure Chagall had good drawing skills.

While I'm not fond of that particular shade of green, in the first example, I rather like the overall composition. 

I think he had better marketing skills? Or his agent did.

 

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16 minutes ago, romberg flat said:

Excellent. The same was what Goebbels thought. ;)

Doesn't matter.  He and broken clocks were right twice a day.

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54 minutes ago, romberg flat said:

Excellent. The same was what Goebbels thought. ;)

Sort of Medal of Honor in Art. And he knew that they could make good money with it after taking it into their exhibition.

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2 hours ago, B.Ceruti said:

Surely you're joking, Mr Feynman!

Like!!!!  :lol:

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33 minutes ago, Bill Merkel said:

After I read that, I ordered a big folding box of cassette tapes of his lectures, thinking it was going to be standup comedy.  Nope.

:P:lol:  I'd love to have tapes to go with his 3 volume set.  Best physics text ever written, helped me a lot in my courses. 

Here's one of the things I remember him for,

:)

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22 hours ago, Violadamore said:

A similar painting by Chagall from 1912, The Fiddler,

image.png.31d3f2a2db91efd1db3f36ff4245467c.png

has been claimed as the inspiration for the title of the musical, but a 2014 newspaper article suggests that the title derives equally from three paintings, the two cited above, plus Le Mort.

That Chagall is one of my favorite paintings.

I love the f-holes on this Picasso, my next tattoo.

 

71mu6x1Nt+L._SX425_.jpg

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2 hours ago, Bill Merkel said:

Is there anything about the bow you love?

The bow? Umm...it's not exactly my favorite element in the painting but I like the cubist riff that the tip and frog are inverse and you can see the end of the button and the flat of the hair when looking at the side of the bow.

Was there something particular about the bow that caught your eye?

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In the words of W. Kandinsky (another degenerated artist :lol:): "One should picture the spirit of a subject, not a subject itself." 


4e841ab9a111c48195737482b06c5716.jpg.19eebb20e0c35444efd4ebdfe9241492.jpg

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4 hours ago, romberg flat said:

In the words of W. Kandinsky (another degenerated artist :lol:): "One should picture the spirit of a subject, not a subject itself." 


 

So, reasoning along those lines, when Rothko produced a huge expanse of dingy emptiness, he was, perhaps, capturing the essential soul of an art critic?  :ph34r::lol:

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5 minutes ago, Byrdbop said:

I get the impression classically trained musicians are uncomfortable with freedom of expression.

:D

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2 hours ago, Byrdbop said:

I get the impression classically trained musicians are uncomfortable with freedom of expression.

"Freedom of expression" is fine.  IMHO, using it as a fig leaf for throwing technical performance standards out the window, and assenting when megabucks get paid for something that could have been produced by smearing your heinie with paint, and scooting it across a canvas, or, when you are capable of fine work, producing something that could be rivaled by a kid's "refrigerator painting" with the intent of proclaiming that "Our culture is all crap!!" (see: "Dada", etc.) isn't. :P

With regard to "classically trained musicians" being perhaps less tolerant of undershooting a technical standard than some other groups, try covering blowing a passage of some standard like "the Sibelius" out your.........ears as "artistic license" some time, and see what response you get.  :lol:

BTW, I view Chagall's stuff, with its inclusion of Hasidic folk motifs coming from his own origins, as being of a different nature than most "modern" art on the market.  :)

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