Sign in to follow this  
ClefLover

Another South France violin...

Recommended Posts

... another BS... I’ve never had a dealer or an auction house consider the sound of instrument. Sad but true. Condition, maker, certification - yes  but sound - no

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, germain said:

I’ve never had a dealer or an auction house consider the sound of instrument. Sad but true.

Not true. A reknown german auction house regulary regarded their stuff as "very well sounding", "concert tone", ""one of the best sounding examples" etc. There might have been a reason that they stopped it.;)

Also there was an auction recently showing videos of this young lady playing their violins, Amati or Bromptons? Don't know if this was really helpful.

BTW, another secret is that you always can find someone making sophisticated regraduations if you are unhappy with the sound.But never tell.:ph34r:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, germain said:

... another BS... I’ve never had a dealer or an auction house consider the sound of instrument. Sad but true. Condition, maker, certification - yes  but sound - no

I assume you mean when it comes to pricing? 

If so there are very good reasons for this as we have discussed at length here on this forum.

22 minutes ago, Blank face said:

Not true. A reknown german auction house regulary regarded their stuff as "very well sounding", "concert tone", ""one of the best sounding examples" etc. There might have been a reason that they stopped it.;)

 

They still do ....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

With a monotonous regularity, a Maestronet contributor (the last one was “Danube Fiddler”) seems convinced that “sound” should be the sole (or near sole) criteria for a violin value appraisal, and works himself up into a righteous fury because it in reality isn’t.

 

Violins (Violas, Celli, etc.) are, and have always been, two separate things simultaneously. They are 1) the equipment of a musician and 2) a collectible object of cultural heritage. It is the second of these traits that is significant when ascertaining a price. Should one insist on differing from this reality, one would be well advised to concentrate ones search in the late 19th C. “Dutzendarbeit” sector, since there are exceptions in that sphere that will provide the best “value for money” if not the best “resale” prospects.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/7/2019 at 7:14 PM, Michael H said:

Or in my case, a foolish dealer.  I have been a small dealer for less that a decade, mainly celli.  I was burned deeply by this seller, but it was my lack of experience to blame. I bought several violins and about a dozen bows.  2 of the bows ended up being genuine, yet everything else was as described above, various grades of Mirecourt and German trade stuff.  To make matters worse, I tried to sell them for profit, but luckily no one bit, except for the 2 nice bows.  I was able to unload everything eventually, but at a tremendous loss of money and dignity.  Salchow and several others set me straight and I am more careful now.  

That sucks.  We live and learn, I guess.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Blank face said:

Not true. A reknown german auction house regulary regarded their stuff as "very well sounding", "concert tone", ""one of the best sounding examples" etc. There might have been a reason that they stopped it.;)

Also there was an auction recently showing videos of this young lady playing their violins, Amati or Bromptons? Don't know if this was really helpful.

BTW, another secret is that you always can find someone making sophisticated regraduations if you are unhappy with the sound.But never tell.:ph34r:

He still does... perhaps his son tests all instruments?

Can't believe people still buy there, most nervous and annoying person I've ever met, likes to cheat people to and doesn't care.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/9/2019 at 5:25 AM, jacobsaunders said:

Violins (Violas, Celli, etc.) are, and have always been, two separate things simultaneously. They are 1) the equipment of a musician and 2) a collectible object of cultural heritage. It is the second of these traits that is significant when ascertaining a price. Should one insist on differing from this reality, one would be well advised to concentrate ones search in the late 19th C. “Dutzendarbeit” sector, since there are exceptions in that sphere that will provide the best “value for money” if not the best “resale” prospects.

True.  Lots of good fiddles amongst the "rubbish".  :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.