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Kristen Stadelmaier

Can you tell me anything about this instrument? Labeled Maregno Romanus Rinaldi

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13 hours ago, Kristen Stadelmaier said:

Another update. On closer inspection, I'm furious to say the purlfing is painted on. That really grinds my gears.

Typical e-bay sale.

Only if the seller wrote in the description 'fully purfled' you could claim your money back on the ground of misrepresentation. However I guess the seller 'wisely' didn't specify anything.

 

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14 hours ago, Kristen Stadelmaier said:

Another update. On closer inspection, I'm furious to say the purlfing is painted on. That really grinds my gears.

It sure does not look painted-on in the pictures of the top. Those grain lines do not go through the purfling.

1559691436298213379916342826790.jpg

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Outside of the "usual" "we" are are utterly overthinking $150 (or even $500 with repairs)...

Fix it if you like, play it for the 8-year olds if it works. 

If not - move on. Lesson learned. And with today's price of education, not even all that expensive. 

Plus, you could get a wall hanging out of it all at the end...:P

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2 hours ago, Rue said:

???

I thought this was a rosin?

Nope

Hidersine offer an extensive range of student violins ( obviously Chinese) but very well set up and very nicely finished. This is in the UK! 

Sorry edit - I didn't notice the earlier post!

Edited by reg

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I started teaching on a not-so-great violin. I got a much nicer fiddle and it has made me a much better teacher. If you try to show a student something and the violin can't do it or won't without great effort, then it makes it much harder to effectively communicate your lesson.

IMHO, this is strictly true within a very limited frame of reference (what's easy for you) but terrible advice for teachers.

Teachers should demonstrate things using and bows in every way comparable to the students.'  I say this on the basis of having endured a chamber music coach who insisted that the dotted rythms in the first movement of the Kaiser quartet had to be played at the tip despite the fact I was playing a 1930s Markie bow that was too stiff in that region to do anything even remotely like that. As far as he was concerned, that was the right way to do it, and the dysfunction was my personal problem. He gave me a "B" because I couldn't manage it. (With that bow, nobody could have).

While that was going on, I was coping with a violin teacher who expected me to duplicate, with a stiff-ish, semi-modern (ca. 1930s) Hungarian fiddle that I had to lean into to pull a full sound, the kind of playing he could do with a 1717 Strad with a flyweight Tubbs. I could do what he did with the bow the way he did it, skating over the top, but then he'd complain that I wasn't playing loudly enough (which was probably true as far as it went).  Those two, mutually-exclusive expectations comprised a vicious circle with no exit/solution. Teachers (in my experience at least) can fail to take such fundamental limitations in equipment into consideration.

"Do it the way I do it" can necessitate upgrades. Absent these, frustration and an undeserved sense of personal inadequacy from being unable to make a silk purse out of a sow's ear.

As always, FWIW.

 

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1 minute ago, A432 said:

 

 

IMHO, this is strictly true within a very limited frame of reference (what's easy for you) but terrible advice for teachers.

Teachers should demonstrate things using and bows in every way comparable to the students.'  I say this on the basis of having endured a chamber music coach who insisted that the dotted rythms in the first movement of the Kaiser quartet had to be played at the tip despite the fact I was playing a 1930s Markie bow that was too stiff in that region to do anything even remotely like that. As far as he was concerned, that was the right way to do it, and the dysfunction was my personal problem. He gave me a "B" because I couldn't manage it. (With that bow, nobody could).

While that was going on, I was coping with a violin teacher who expected me to duplicate, with a stiff-ish, semi-modern (ca. 1930s) Hungarian fiddle that I had to lean into to pull a full sound, the kind of playing he could do with a 1717 Strad with a flyweight Tubbs. I could do what he did with the bow the way he did it, skating over the top, but then he'd complain that I wasn't playing loudly enough (which was probably true as far as it went).  Those two, mutually-exclusive expectations comprised a vicious circle with no exit/solution. Teachers (in my experience at least) can fail to take such fundamental limitations in equipment into consideration.

"Do it the way I do it" can necessitate upgrades. Absent these, frustration and an undeserved sense of personal inadequacy from being unable to make a silk purse out of a sow's ear.

As always, FWIW.

 

I appreciate this advice! However, I think it's the mark of a good teacher to demonstrate the sound and technique they want from a student, and if the student's instrument or bow can't do what is required of it, then the teacher recognizes it and modifies it so the student can perform well. Then, as the student grows in skill and upgrades equipment, to modify more towards the original technique.

For example, I'll take your example. If my student was having the issues you were, I'd tell them to try it slightly lower on the bow so the notes speak, and help the student play within the limitations of his instrument. 

Thanks for making this point, before I read it I hadn't really thought about that, but now I'll be even more conscious of it! :)

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I really do not understand something reading that post. It is a cheap fiddle, and it was bought for very small money, fair price.  (I know some people spending more money for trash like that.)  If someone expect  a professional instrument for such a price, probably he is still believing Santa is real guy living in Finland. And there is no hope to get professionally usable instrument for a such a price. All possible repairs will not make it usable other as for decor on wall, miracles are not happen.

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8 minutes ago, mathieu valde said:

I really do not understand something reading that post. It is a cheap fiddle, and it was bought for very small money, fair price.  

Being a teacher in her situation doesn't pay a lot of money.  After monthly payments for rent and a nice ride there is not much left.  Is Kristen starving for food at times?  Only if there's no hubby or other steady on the scene. 

If I'm wrong she can let me have it here on public forum - sorry in advance. 

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Kristen --

I probably could have done a better job myself.

The problem was that he expected me to basically imitate Nathan Milstein, with a lot of finesse and at Heifetz-rapid tempos (every time I brought in another concerto he'd assigned and started playing it for the first time, he'd stop me after a few seconds and say, "That's a practice tempo. Play it up to speed" and the struggle would resume. 

You can see better, I think, what I was trying to get across. When you're imitating Milstein, You're doing everything the way he did it. Same bow speeds, &c.

Fast was no problem, and loud was no problem. But both at the same time, given what I was coping with, was not an available option.

Thanks for your comment.

 

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I have spent more than a few dollars on instruments that were merely learning experiences for me. In this instance, Kristen,  I think it might be true for you as well. I can see that the fingerboard needs planing very badly, but if the neck is at the wrong angle, it would cost much more than you paid for the whole instrument to have it reset, plus it is a big deal to do that correctly. I would give my best puppy dog eyes to the violin shop owner and see if you can get your money back, but offer to spend it all on one of his violins.

The puppy dog eyes thing, by the way, never works for me, but I would imagine that you have nicer eyes than I do

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14 minutes ago, A432 said:

...

The problem was that he expected me to basically imitate Nathan Milstein, with a lot of finesse and at Heifetz-rapid tempos (every time I brought in another concerto he'd assigned and started playing it for the first time, he'd stop me after a few seconds and say, "That's a practice tempo. Play it up to speed" and the struggle would resume. 

You can see better, I think, what I was trying to get across. When you're imitating Milstein, You're doing everything the way he did it. Same bow speeds, &c.

Fast was no problem, and loud was no problem. But both at the same time, given what I was coping with, was not an available option...

Wow. You were in a very advanced class of 8- year olds! :wacko:

I hope your parents spoke with that teacher...no one should blame a small child for their equipment or have unreasonable/unbending expectations.

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28 minutes ago, Rue said:

Wow. You were in a very advanced class of 8- year olds! :wacko:

I hope your parents spoke with that teacher...no one should blame a small child for their equipment or have unreasonable/unbending expectations.

I have a student right now, in third grade (age 8) who came to me from the local Suzuki school. She's decent, but it's evident her teacher didn't spend enough time on fundamentals. She's in book 2, but should still be in book 1.

She told me in her first lesson that her teacher would demean her and tell her to "do it right" but wouldn't show her, and that she expected 5 or 6 things to be perfect each week. 

She must be traumatized by it, because she was so nervous about messing up in our second lesson. I've scaled everything back and we're just working on one Suzuki piece and her scale book.

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7 hours ago, uncle duke said:

Being a teacher in her situation doesn't pay a lot of money.  After monthly payments for rent and a nice ride there is not much left.  Is Kristen starving for food at times?  Only if there's no hubby or other steady on the scene. 

If I'm wrong she can let me have it here on public forum - sorry in advance. 

Hi! Right now, my income is extremely limited. I'm a substitute teacher, have five students in my own studio, and three students in a studio where I'm a sub-contractor. Subbing gets me $100-125 a day based on where I go, and my contractor job only gets me around $200 per month. My own studio (if I were to have each kid every week for the month) yields about $750 per month. Months with breaks at school kill me. That's up to $525 less that I make if I have the highest paying school for 5 days. I've also got grad school tuition, which I'm paying out of pocket to avoid more student loans.

While I live at home with my parents still (groan), they're gracious enough to waive a rent fee. However, I have my car, estimated taxes, phone, gas (I blow through gas with my dad's Chevy equinox and drive all over kingdom come for my jobs), food, music expenses, etc. This month I had exactly the amount of cash needed to pay. There have been days where I needed to pay for gas and have had to skip meals.

When I get married, my husband (boyfriend for right now, hopefully he'll upgrade soon ;) ) will be able to help with his well-paying IT job, but for now, I'm on my own. 

In New York State, public school teachers make anywhere from $35k-$80k. If you're tenured with 35 years in a GREAT district, you might get more. 

So, yeah, this little violin was all I could afford. I think for now, it'll be alright. I'll save up to get it fixed up, which might take a bit, but that's fine. Someday I'll make it a decoration if it doesn't serve me well.

I appreciate you making an effort to explain! :)

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Sounds like you are a hardworking, dedicated teacher! I'm glad you have support at home for the meantime.  Hope it all works out for you! :)

Don't forget to let us know what your luthier says and how the instrument pans out!

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25 minutes ago, Rue said:

Sounds like you are a hardworking, dedicated teacher! I'm glad you have support at home for the meantime.  Hope it all works out for you! :)

Don't forget to let us know what your luthier says and how the instrument pans out!

Thanks Rue! I'm sort of in that limbo stage where I'm not quite there yet in terms of my career, but I still have the financial burdens of someone who IS there. I'm really blessed my parents take pity on me as the starving artist that I am and let me live there for free, especially since I'm 24.

I'll try to go up on Friday before I teach!

Also, I am selling my Anton Breton violin to my little cousin, but it would benefit from new pegs and a Wittner tailpiece or something similar, even if they're not high end. Is it worth it, since she's family? The pegs work, but get really swollen in the summer to the point where even my boyfriend was having trouble turning them. The tailpiece is a cheap Chinese one and the fine tuners are in rough shape. Maybe I'll order some tuners and install them myself. I'll throw some Tonicas on for her too. I figure I could get $170 or so for the violin, Holtz student bow, and the cheap oblong case.

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8 hours ago, A432 said:

IMHO, this is strictly true within a very limited frame of reference (what's easy for you) but terrible advice for teachers.

Teachers should demonstrate things using and bows in every way comparable to the students.'  I say this on the basis of having endured a chamber music coach who insisted that the dotted rythms in the first movement of the Kaiser quartet had to be played at the tip despite the fact I was playing a 1930s Markie bow that was too stiff in that region to do anything even remotely like that. As far as he was concerned, that was the right way to do it, and the dysfunction was my personal problem. He gave me a "B" because I couldn't manage it. (With that bow, nobody could have).

While that was going on, I was coping with a violin teacher who expected me to duplicate, with a stiff-ish, semi-modern (ca. 1930s) Hungarian fiddle that I had to lean into to pull a full sound, the kind of playing he could do with a 1717 Strad with a flyweight Tubbs. I could do what he did with the bow the way he did it, skating over the top, but then he'd complain that I wasn't playing loudly enough (which was probably true as far as it went).  Those two, mutually-exclusive expectations comprised a vicious circle with no exit/solution. Teachers (in my experience at least) can fail to take such fundamental limitations in equipment into consideration.

"Do it the way I do it" can necessitate upgrades. Absent these, frustration and an undeserved sense of personal inadequacy from being unable to make a silk purse out of a sow's ear.

As always, FWIW.

 

You had bad teachers, but I strongly disagree that the teacher should play with the same equipment that a student uses. Children are not going to learn what makes a great instrument, or even a good instrument, if they do not constantly hear the difference between their own firewood and pool cue and your quality pieces.

I am constantly letting students play on my own stuff, but I am also constantly helping them work with the limits of their own stuff. When they become advanced enough that their equipment is noticeably lacking, it is time to buy better equipment, and because you have been training them by letting them use your own, they will be much better equipped when they go shopping, although they should never go shopping on their own.

But with all due respect, it is unwise for the teacher to use the same equipment at the student uses. Use the best you can.

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1 hour ago, Kristen Stadelmaier said:

Hi! Right now, my income is extremely limited. I'm a substitute teacher, have five students in my own studio, and three students in a studio where I'm a sub-contractor. Subbing gets me $100-125 a day based on where I go, and my contractor job only gets me around $200 per month. My own studio (if I were to have each kid every week for the month) yields about $750 per month. Months with breaks at school kill me. That's up to $525 less that I make if I have the highest paying school for 5 days. I've also got grad school tuition, which I'm paying out of pocket to avoid more student loans.

While I live at home with my parents still (groan), they're gracious enough to waive a rent fee. However, I have my car, estimated taxes, phone, gas (I blow through gas with my dad's Chevy equinox and drive all over kingdom come for my jobs), food, music expenses, etc. This month I had exactly the amount of cash needed to pay. There have been days where I needed to pay for gas and have had to skip meals.

When I get married, my husband (boyfriend for right now, hopefully he'll upgrade soon ;) ) will be able to help with his well-paying IT job, but for now, I'm on my own. 

In New York State, public school teachers make anywhere from $35k-$80k. If you're tenured with 35 years in a GREAT district, you might get more. 

So, yeah, this little violin was all I could afford. I think for now, it'll be alright. I'll save up to get it fixed up, which might take a bit, but that's fine. Someday I'll make it a decoration if it doesn't serve me well.

I appreciate you making an effort to explain! :)

Move to Texas. No joke. Pin the guy to a lifetime contract, and come to Texas where there’s lots of free-lance work, living expenses are low, we have two( TWO) baseball teams, no state taxes and state base is 48k.

 

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And please sweet Lord, don’t use Suzuki. Find real music that is level-appropriate, charming and of good quality. Please. Your students will be proud to be playing real music, you’ll find it interesting to be teaching other music, and you can separate yourself from the assembly line teachers who never think about such things. In 30+ years, I’ve never had to resort to that ghastly Suzuki stuff( although I read Suzuki’s autobiography with much love and much agreement) and I’m always looking for more good music.

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5 minutes ago, PhilipKT said:

Move to Texas. No joke. Pin the guy to a lifetime contract, and come to Texas where there’s lots of free-lance work, living expenses are low, we have two( TWO) baseball teams, no state taxes and state base is 48k.

 

Wanna know something really ironic? My bf is from El Paso, and his parents are there and one of his brothers lives in Austin! 

We went in March for his niece's wedding and I fell in love with Austin. We're going back for Christmas hopefully!

I'd love to move there, but I'm sure my mom would die if I left her LOL!

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3 minutes ago, PhilipKT said:

And please sweet Lord, don’t use Suzuki. Find real music that is level-appropriate, charming and of good quality. Please. Your students will be proud to be playing real music, you’ll find it interesting to be teaching other music, and you can separate yourself from the assembly line teachers who never think about such things. In 30+ years, I’ve never had to resort to that ghastly Suzuki stuff( although I read Suzuki’s autobiography with much love and much agreement) and I’m always looking for more good music.

I do a modified Suzuki, and Essential Elements for my little ones, and let my kids pick fun music they want to do once they get some good fundamentals.

I've got my fourth grader (age 9) whom I started last June already halfway through Suzuki 1 and EE 1, and she's doing G/A 2 octaves, and is constantly asking me for more Disney and real rep. So, I'm always on the hunt for easy versions of rep like Pachelbel (GROAN) and Eine Kleine. She's insatiable in her quest for more music. Once she gets better, I'm going to start her with Irish music. She can already do 6/8! Picked it right up in 20 minutes!

The contracting job I have is Suzuki based, so I'm at least going to do the beginning course, as per requirement. It's good to be well-rounded.

I'm not a huge fan of teaching REALLY young ones violin. I've got a 4 year old who can't pay attention long enough to even get through the theme of Twinkles, but she does great with writing, counting, and clapping rhythms.

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If you are short of money (like there are many) it's the usual beginner's mistake to look for something which can be bought cheaply but turns out regulary to be the bottomless pit; once starting to invest in junk you can't stop untill you'll have paid more than it would have been for two fiddles of a better quality without need for such investments. (And don't listen to those trying to lead you on the dark path of autodidactical self repairing, spending more on expensive tools, books and wasting time endlessly:ph34r:)

Such a ruined instrument is worthless for both musicians and collectors, and the last as a wall hanger (because it lacks aesthetical attraction like originality, patina etc.).

Just if you have very limited ressources it should be more important to ask for advice before buying a pseudo-cheap instrument; looking for something you can buy for instalment paying and test before purchasing it can be an alternative.

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5 hours ago, Blank face said:

If you are short of money (like there are many) it's the usual beginner's mistake to look for something which can be bought cheaply but turns out regulary to be the bottomless pit; once starting to invest in junk you can't stop untill you'll have paid more than it would have been for two fiddles of a better quality without need for such investments. (And don't listen to those trying to lead you on the dark path of autodidactical self repairing, spending more on expensive tools, books and wasting time endlessly:ph34r:)

Such a ruined instrument is worthless for both musicians and collectors, and the last as a wall hanger (because it lacks aesthetical attraction like originality, patina etc.).

Just if you have very limited ressources it should be more important to ask for advice before buying a pseudo-cheap instrument; looking for something you can buy for instalment paying and test before purchasing it can be an alternative.

Sound advice there :)

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12 hours ago, Blank face said:

If you are short of money (like there are many) it's the usual beginner's mistake to look for something which can be bought cheaply but turns out regulary to be the bottomless pit; once starting to invest in junk you can't stop untill you'll have paid more than it would have been for two fiddles of a better quality without need for such investments. (And don't listen to those trying to lead you on the dark path of autodidactical self repairing, spending more on expensive tools, books and wasting time endlessly:ph34r:)

Such a ruined instrument is worthless for both musicians and collectors, and the last as a wall hanger (because it lacks aesthetical attraction like originality, patina etc.).

Just if you have very limited ressources it should be more important to ask for advice before buying a pseudo-cheap instrument; looking for something you can buy for instalment paying and test before purchasing it can be an alternative.

exactly. As I coming from quite poor post soviet country, I do not trust Kristen is really at bad finacial situation if we compare with such situation in many post soviet countries. where violin teachers normally are really poor.

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You had bad teachers, but I strongly disagree that the teacher should play with the same equipment that a student uses. Children are not going to learn what makes a great instrument, or even a good instrument, if they do not constantly hear the difference between their own firewood and pool cue and your quality pieces.

Meh.

Nobody needs to hear more than a handful of A-list soloists with great instruments to "get" that distinction without paying you to point it out.

In the final analysis, it's not about instrument quality -- even the great ones have distinct limitations. It's about learning to use what you have most effectively.

What somebody else can do with a better kit is irrelevant to that quest, while been-there-done-that demonstrations of what can be done within the limitations involved, with explanations, are difference makers.

 

FWIW

 

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Hey guys!! I took the violin to my luthier, who is very good, and he said I did a great job! He said late 1800s German "Rinaldi" copy, and he said the only thing it needs is a new fingerboard and bridge.

The fingerboard had too much of a scoop to fix, and was starting to warp on the bottom. 

He said with what I paid and what repairs will cost, that I'll still come out under what he would sell it for, and he's extremely honest in his pricing.

So, it may not be a real Rinaldi, but it'll do just fine for my kiddos. :)

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