Sign in to follow this  
BigFryMan

Tap tones are too low! What to do next...

Recommended Posts

2 hours ago, scordatura said:

Does spruce or maple change more on average?

It varies a lot from one piece of wood to another, but with the lighter treatment I give to the maple, the changes are also less.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, edi malinaric said:

Hi BigFryMan - having owned a wolf-dog I immediately saw him in the tea leaves - the rest followed.

DSC02144.thumb.JPG.db8411af4437dd5167008c52cbf3684e.JPG

Wonderful companion - mother was a Siberian wolf (that's her colouring - exactly), father was a Grey wolf/Belgian Shepherd cross.

cheers edi

Hahaha I like it. My favourite dog is either a malamute or malamute cross husky. A bit hot for them where I live though. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, edi malinaric said:

DSC02144.thumb.JPG.db8411af4437dd5167008c52cbf3684e.JPG

 

A reply for Not telling and Mr. Q - this type of animal is present in Kansas.  They get bigger though and have more of the wolf trait.  They are legal in our state to own and breed but some do escape. 

A few winters ago one showed up, late at night, sub zero temps, nose to the ground looking for food and before I knew it he was 18 ft. away from me.   Glad there was a fence between he and myself.  I yelled out "no", he looked at me like "you gonna give me some feed?" , no , I guess I'll be on my way then.

A few minutes later along with searching a few other properties he was heading back west.  Next day I mentioned to others about it.  Replies were like whatever, yeah right. 

A few weeks later, a few miles away, he shows up again and then the word got out and words comes back to me.  I mentioned "I told you so".

I have seen one bear - the only animal I haven't seen in the wild around these parts is the cougar - though to this day I wonder which animal twenty years or so ago ran off with a carp and a buffalo fish I had laid out to dry out and die.  Laid them fifty feet away close to some brush back in a cove at Melvern.  These were big fish.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

These data were posted in another thread..

Maker -        year               belly                           back

 Nicolo Amati                     d sharp                     F

Nicolo Amati                      F                                 G sharp

Carlo Bergonzi                   E                                D sharp

Gasparo Da Salo                F                                F sharp

Strad       1701                    E                                  E +

Strad        1708                   F                                  E+

Strad          1709                 F sharp +                     G

Strad          1712                 G +                               G

Strad         1726                 E                                    F +

Strad         1720                 F +                                 F +

From Anders Buen. 
As you can see quite a few of these plates fall outside of the 340-360hz range although that may be the mean. 

That suggests to me that the modes are more of a byproduct of graduating the plates to an acceptable range and stiffness.  
I can't imagine that Stradivari, being so precise about every detail, would be so careless in tuning to his plates to a specific frequency if that were his aim. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@DoorMouse

Thanks, that's handy info.

I agree that the modes correlate with stiffness, this is why I am paying attention. I don't have the benefits of hands on guidance, I am unfortunately completely self taught. I would love to have an experienced maker grab my plates and flex and pull them because they would have an idea of how a skillfully graduated plate should feel. Because I don't have this, I'm trying to get into the ballpark of correct stiffness by using the weight and modes of the plates as a guide. Then if they turn out to sound great and play well, I know I am in the ballpark to make comparisons on similar spruce or maple.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, uncle duke said:

- snip -

They get bigger though and have more of the wolf trait.  They are legal in our state to own and breed but some do escape. 

A few winters ago one showed up, late at night, sub zero temps, nose to the ground looking for food and before I knew it he was 18 ft. away from me.   Glad there was a fence between he and myself.  I yelled out "no", he looked at me like "you gonna give me some feed?" , no , I guess I'll be on my way then.

- snip -

Hi Uncle Duke

"Bigger" Not sure that I'd have wanted bigger.

Although I gather that the Siberian wolf is The Big One - the guy that lopes after the sleigh, eats the thrown off passengers for starters, the sleigh driver complete with his buffalo skin coat as the main course and enjoys the horse for desert. 

Small wonder that Santa is always shown as delivering Xmas presents by air.

Chetka was an incredibly neat and compact animal. We have a nephew, Robbie, who stands over 6' 6" in his socks. Whenever he and C met, C would greet him by unfolding like a double ended folding knife, placing his front paws on Robbie's shoulders and looking at him eye-to-eye! Never greeted anyone else that way - ever.

Another time Rose and I were at an outdoor cafe having a "cuppa" and an Asian lass walked past - looked at C, paused and walked on. A couple of minutes she returned, walking a little slower, eyes drinking him in. I greeted her and asked if she wanted to pet him. She beamed and almost hugged him to death. He seemed to enjoy it.

1226612423_ChetkaJane-HoutBay2011nov21.jpg.4cad8b774d41b4e1c4d36d1ddd8fcdc8.jpg

 

Local Ordinance says that dogs must be leashed - against the penalty of paying  lots of money. OK, OK - so, in the spirit of the law, I would double the leash a couple of times and slip it through his collar.

No - he didn't need to be bigger - he was just the right size to fill out his skin. :-)

Your encounter is interesting. Normal behavior would mean that you wouldn't have seen him at all. I would suspect that he had been "pre-owned". They communicate superbly - if - you are able to  receive their message! My compliments to you.

I might have been tempted to "talk" him in, put out some food and water and make him welcome. Nothing like having an animal that chooses to come to you.

cheers edi

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, DoorMouse said:

These data were posted in another thread..

Maker -        year               belly                           back

 Nicolo Amati                     d sharp                     F

Nicolo Amati                      F                                 G sharp

Carlo Bergonzi                   E                                D sharp

Gasparo Da Salo                F                                F sharp 

Strad       1701                    E                                  E +

Strad        1708                   F                                  E+

Strad          1709                 F sharp +                     G

Strad          1712                 G +                               G

Strad         1726                 E                                    F +

Strad         1720                 F +                                 F +

From Anders Buen. 
As you can see quite a few of these plates fall outside of the 340-360hz range although that may be the mean. 

That suggests to me that the modes are more of a byproduct of graduating the plates to an acceptable range and stiffness.  
I can't imagine that Stradivari, being so precise about every detail, would be so careless in tuning to his plates to a specific frequency if that were his aim. 

Hi Doormouse, here's a nice graph with actual frequencies (data from Mockel, blue dot was my #5)

taptones5.thumb.JPG.955dd6ee52bdc12d649933ecdd01cae1.JPG

 

I wonder what those numbers were 300 years ago. According to Stewart Pollens even Strads were regraduated ("thinned to perfection") because they were "too thick in wood". I cant find any additional information on that, but we know most DG's were thinned.

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, edi malinaric said:

 Your encounter is interesting. Normal behavior would mean that you wouldn't have seen him at all. I would suspect that he had been "pre-owned". They communicate superbly - if - you are able to  receive their message! My compliments to you.

I might have been tempted to "talk" him in, put out some food and water and make him welcome. Nothing like having an animal that chooses to come to you.

cheers edi

The stealthiness of the animal is what caught me off guard.  I lost view of him about 100 ft. away - before I knew it he was right behind the closest auto to the back door of the house in the driveway here.  He may of been deaf.  Appeared to be an old animal - his ears were all shrunk or cropped/withered away.  I was glad he chose to turn away and leave.

Maybe this type of animal is preprogrammed at a young age on about how to go about living out their life and then just spend the rest of the time doing just so.

I sure could use him to help fend off Julian's and Dwight"s feral swine and armadillo heards which seem to be slowly but surely migrating northwards.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, uncle duke said:

- snip -

I sure could use him to help fend off Julian's and Dwight"s feral swine and armadillo heards which seem to be slowly but surely migrating northwards.

Hi Uncle Duke - simplicity itself. Start a salami making facility - advertise it as "we only use local products" and whisper in the ears of the local hunting fraternity.

Traditionally salami is made using two different meats - pork and any road kill lying around. Flavour added according to the date of death of the ingredients.

Dad was caught bunking school - he didn't see what use Latin was going to be in his life - so Grandad apprenticed him to a butcher! (ouch! - that was more than a century ago) Anyway Dad assured me that the best salami was a 70/30 mix of pork and - wait for it......  donkey. I expressed disbelief - he looked at me -and asked me if I knew what happened to them when they became too old to work? Apparently the mix reflected the availability of the ingredients :-)

So there you are - your secret recipe for a local salami delicacy - pork and armadillo. If it catches on those herds will quickly become a memory - and you'll then have to start a breeding programme. For a touch of class use only tone-wood maple off-cuts to fuel the smoker.

cheers edi

PS - only admit to the pork!

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.