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tchaikovsgay

Lubricating the Bow?

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On 5/12/2019 at 1:41 AM, tchaikovsgay said:

Do you have a link?

You shouldn't need a link for beeswax. Just look around any market for a pure beeswax candle, or check in with your local neighbourhood beekeeper.

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22 hours ago, Bill Yacey said:

Bee wax doesn't migrate anywhere, unless it get's so hot that it melts. You have to be playing furiously before this happens.

Yes I think that most of the specially made bow lubricants are primarily bees wax and unlike oils or greases will not move on their own. However even wax can contaminate the hair when if it gets onto hands or  onto the bench. I frequently see bow hair which has obviously been in contact with some kind of crud and am ultra cautious about any kind of lubricants in the shop.

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On May 12, 2019 at 8:27 AM, ClefLover said:

I’m here... What’s wrong with a little PB Lube?  Some for my car, some for my door hinge, some for my bow.

I am not sure what PB lube is but If you are serious the problem is that the gray grease which I am talking about contaminates  the parts tray and the nipple of the bow and from there to who knows where. Even the tiniest amount of some lubricants can cause bow hair to not hold rosin properly and can also cause varnish or gluing problems in other areas of the shop. The bows I have seen with this stuff have had so much  applied that it has gotten onto the underside and the stick under the frog further risking transfer to other places.

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1 hour ago, nathan slobodkin said:

I am not sure what PB lube is but If you are serious the problem is that the gray grease which I am talking about contaminates  the parts tray and the nipple of the bow and from there to who knows where. Even the tiniest amount of some lubricants can cause bow hair to not hold rosin properly and can also cause varnish or gluing problems in other areas of the shop. The bows I have seen with this stuff have had so much  applied that it has gotten onto the underside and the stick under the frog further risking transfer to other places.

I typically use it to clean off the screw to my Arcus bow.  Luckily, it is CF.  I’ll find a different alternative.  Thanks for the heads up!

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Natural beeswax sometimes can be slightly acidic, due to sugars degradation, which is not the case with artificial (paraffine) wax (never gummy if one uses it very sparingly - first onto the rag, then onto the - previously cleaned - screw).

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4 hours ago, franciscus said:

Natural beeswax sometimes can be slightly acidic, due to sugars degradation, which is not the case with artificial (paraffine) wax (never gummy if one uses it very sparingly - first onto the rag, then onto the - previously cleaned - screw).

Franciscus ... where have you been!?

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5 hours ago, martin swan said:

Franciscus ... where have you been!?

Judging from his picture I would say that he's been in a coffin in Count Dracula's castle.

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13 hours ago, franciscus said:

Natural beeswax sometimes can be slightly acidic, due to sugars degradation, which is not the case with artificial (paraffine) wax (never gummy if one uses it very sparingly - first onto the rag, then onto the - previously cleaned - screw).

I would be more concerned about using bar soap, which contains lye and is hygroscopic.

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13 hours ago, martin swan said:

Franciscus ... where have you been!?

Hi, Martin! I was working on a complex project: the first goal was to survive my daughter's marriage, and the second goal was to become a full professor. The first goal has been achieved, at least for now (since I'm still alive), and to the other, I have much more to ride. Hope that you are alive and kicking :) 

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4 hours ago, Bill Yacey said:

I would be more concerned about using bar soap, which contains lye and is hygroscopic.

Agreed - that's the reason for the use of paraffine wax.

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Beeswax is rather nasty for that application, I believe, though it can be a good lubracant.

Canning wax is extremely clean and refined, a great lubricant. To cut aluminum with a saw or file it without clogging up,,,  canning wax is the ticket.

I have cut circles in  2" thick aluminum with a saber saw, using canning wax for a lubricant, many many times and the blade doesn't gum up with aluminum.

A dab on a band saw blade does great,, I tried some beeswax on a band saw blade once,, really bad idea, it got so gummy and gross it stopped the saw cold.

Had to take it apart and heat it up to get it all off,,, what a mess.

I make a mixture of three different waxes and olive oil that is a super lubricant, bees wax is one of them. Just a tiny bit goes a long way and doesn't make a big mess. Works on almost anything,  metal, wood,,, I use it on bolts being used under boiling water and it stays on and works for a long time. I know it sounds nuts but it does work, better than anything else.  Other wise the bolts get rusty and stiff, it lasts about 100 cycles, good enough I'd say for 50 cents.

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