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Sanding betweeen spirit varnish coats

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48 minutes ago, sospiri said:

May I enquire why you feel that way about decreased texture?

I can only speak for myself... I just finished a viola that has extremely fine growth (many early strads are like this -- the Archinto viola for example). I used a typical solvent free oil varnish with no sanding or polishing between coats -- the resulting surface texture on the belly is very subtle. Quite different from other instruments I've made with wider grain that results in what some call a 'ripple' or 'corduroy' effect - i.e. the summer growth swells - similar to what one sees on the Messiah strad or the Guarneri above

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1 hour ago, sospiri said:

May I enquire why you feel that way about decreased texture?

Probably because I've been brainwashed by people who I have considered to be the world's leading experts. ;)

What's the argument for smooth, unless one is trying to copy a contemporary factory guitar, or a gym floor? The old Italian instruments, which are still considered to be the prime example to follow,  were not made that way.

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2 hours ago, David Burgess said:

Probably because I've been brainwashed by people who I have considered to be the world's leading experts. ;)

What's the argument for smooth, unless one is trying to copy a contemporary factory guitar, or a gym floor? The old Italian instruments, which are still considered to be the prime example to follow,  were not made that way.

Easier to clean?:lol:

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11 hours ago, Davide Sora said:

Easier to clean?:lol:

Easier to sell!

PS: actually, where I live you would have hard times selling Messie  - most folks would call it "nice woodwork but the varnish is amateur attempt".

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34 minutes ago, HoGo said:

Easier to sell!

PS: actually, where I live you would have hard times selling Messie  - most folks would call it "nice woodwork but the varnish is amateur attempt".

The Messie is sorely in need of a good antiquing job too, to have broad appeal. ;)

I've often thought about how much fun it would be for a major orchestra player to take the most valuable violin in the world into a rehearsal, to see who calls it a piece of crap. :lol:

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15 hours ago, Urban Luthier said:

I can only speak for myself... I just finished a viola that has extremely fine growth (many early strads are like this -- the Archinto viola for example). I used a typical solvent free oil varnish with no sanding or polishing between coats -- the resulting surface texture on the belly is very subtle. Quite different from other instruments I've made with wider grain that results in what some call a 'ripple' or 'corduroy' effect - i.e. the summer growth swells - similar to what one sees on the Messiah strad or the Guarneri above

Different textures are what they are in my opinion and every piece of wood is different. I don't see anything as good or bad just requiring different techniques for finishing without trying to make it look uniform.

15 hours ago, David Burgess said:

Probably because I've been brainwashed by people who I have considered to be the world's leading experts. ;)

What's the argument for smooth, unless one is trying to copy a contemporary factory guitar, or a gym floor? The old Italian instruments, which are still considered to be the prime example to follow,  were not made that way.

There is no argument. It is what it is. I don't try to scrape raised grain smooth or avoid narrow grain because it makes a smooth varnish texture. So it can be both rough and smooth on the same belly.

I like to see the spruce chattoyance and the rosin sparkling like crushed gemstones and you see this in the smoother areas. Why would I choose wood to avoid these features? they are beautiful.

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56 minutes ago, sospiri said:

I like to see the spruce chattoyance and the rosin sparkling like crushed gemstones and you see this in the smoother areas. Why would I choose wood to avoid these features? they are beautiful.

Because once you are on level of Burgess  ;)  the paying and waiting  customers expect to see other things than you may happen to like :-).

Like in a parody about Flatt and Scruggs telling journalist... "we really hated playing the xyz song first, but after a million records sold we somehow learned to love it..."

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2 minutes ago, HoGo said:

Because once you are on level of Burgess  ;)  the paying and waiting  customers expect to see other things than you like :-).

Like in a parody about Flatt and Scruggs telling journalist... "we really hated playing the xyz song first, but after a million records sold we somehow learned to love it..."

But if I could just touch the hem of his garment....

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