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Dwight Brown

This Viola is Going Home With Someone!

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24 minutes ago, Dwight Brown said:

 

If the buyer gets this for 800K it should be a bargain

 

DLB

Not a chance ....

This is a once in a lifetime kind of event.

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The long arch on the top shows a long "flat" area, that is what I expected to see, but the long arching in the back shows a flat area too. Interesting.

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57 minutes ago, MANFIO said:

The long arch on the top shows a long "flat" area, that is what I expected to see, but the long arching in the back shows a flat area too. Interesting.

Indeed interesting arching concept, would like to know how much of it is due to distortion. It is so intriguing, that we still don’t have the slightest clue about the arching concept of the cremonese. No, god didn’t give them arching templates.

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Why would someone run such a rare and valuable instrument through an auction, where items usually sell for far under retail?

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So I go to my wife, who knows nothing about stringed instruments except that she’d rather put the money into stocks, and I say, with surprise, “there’s a Guarneri viola on Tarisio!  And it’s only been bid up to $800,000!”

She looked at me with a slightly confused look on her face and said,”...oh...well...it’s a viola...”

Boy did that make me laugh.

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1 hour ago, PhilipKT said:

Why would someone run such a rare and valuable instrument through an auction, where items usually sell for far under retail?

Rare and valuable instruments and art works often set price records at auctions. 

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2 hours ago, PhilipKT said:

Why would someone run such a rare and valuable instrument through an auction, where items usually sell for far under retail?

You could say the same thing about any item in any auction. The fact that it is rare and valuable is irrelevant.  

Surely the reason is obvious?

Andrew 

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Actually, in auction psychology there is a phenomena called the "winners curse." It basically states that in a common value auction, the winner almost always pays too much for emotional reasons or because of incomplete information. 

Anybody who bids regularly in auctions should understand the "Winner's Curse." We all get bitten by the curse at one time or another.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Winner's_curse

@PhilipKT

@rudall

@martin swan

 

 

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If an item is desired independent of its market value, then we can't speak of a "winner's curse". And with only 5 of these instruments in the world, a collector would put a far higher value on it than a dealer ...

But the whole winner's curse concept is based on the notion that there is only one true market value for any given item. With violins, nothing could be further from the truth.

 

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15 hours ago, ClefLover said:

I’ll take two!  Supports my philosophy: “why buy one when you can buy two for twice as much!?”

That means, you would trade two puppies for two Guarneri violas? Really?:huh:

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55 minutes ago, Blank face said:

That means, you would trade two puppies for two Guarneri violas? Really?:huh:

Hah!  Yes... even if my heart shrivels up into a black piece of coal. 

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17 hours ago, PhilipKT said:

So I go to my wife, who knows nothing about stringed instruments except that she’d rather put the money into stocks, and I say, with surprise, “there’s a Guarneri viola on Tarisio!  And it’s only been bid up to $800,000!”

She looked at me with a slightly confused look on her face and said,”...oh...well...it’s a viola...”

Boy did that make me laugh.

This made my day :)

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16 hours ago, GeorgeH said:

Rare and valuable instruments and art works often set price records at auctions. 

I own two Gillet bows and love them both. One I bought at Tarisio for about $6500, the other I bought from the widow of the owner for about twice as much(but still under retail) Paul Childs thinks the auction purchase is the better bow( I prefer the other’s playability) but valued them both about the same, which is comfortably above the higher price I paid. A Gillet isn’t the same as a Guarneri but experiences like that led me to suggest that an auction price would be less than a private sale.

on the other hand, I realize that this is a unique item, and might well break records.

what would Messie bring at auction?

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42 minutes ago, PhilipKT said:

.........................

what would Messie bring at auction?

Among other things, a rise in the price of popcorn due to this forum alone...........    :lol:

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Did anyone go to the auction preview? Anything else good? The violin the school gave my daughter for the 5th grade orchestra recital is kind of scratchy. I thought maybe I'd get her this Vuillaume instead ;)

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15 hours ago, GeorgeH said:

Actually, in auction psychology there is a phenomena called the "winners curse." It basically states that in a common value auction, the winner almost always pays too much for emotional reasons or because of incomplete information. 

Anybody who bids regularly in auctions should understand the "Winner's Curse." We all get bitten by the curse at one time or another.

Certain truth to this. But I'll bet that the person who buys this instrument is not a habitual auction buyer.

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Is this the viola that was in exhibition in the Royal College of Music in London? Here a photo I took from it some years ago, the knots are in the same place.

217582_2843548623873_759107152_n.jpg?_nc

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20 hours ago, GeorgeH said:

Actually, in auction psychology there is a phenomena called the "winners curse." It basically states that in a common value auction, the winner almost always pays too much for emotional reasons or because of incomplete information. 

Anybody who bids regularly in auctions should understand the "Winner's Curse." We all get bitten by the curse at one time or another.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Winner's_curse

 

 

 

 

Hubby waaaaay overpaid for a trio of chickens at auction once - I like to remind him of that (a lot).

But - he recently bought a fine art print - that has a chicken in it, that surprised us by closing well under the estimated value range...

?

???

...I forgot what my point was...

Edited by Rue
Wrong word...dunno how it got there...

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7 minutes ago, Rue said:

Hubby waaaaay overpaid for a trio of chickens at auction once - I like to remind him of that (a lot).

But - he recently bought a fine art print - that has a chicken in it, that surprised us by closing well in the estimated value range...

?

???

...I forgot what my point was...

How'd they taste? :D

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