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finnfinnviolin

Very good, inexpensive burnisher for scrapers.

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Hi everyone, Just wanted to show people these little carbide burnishers. I think they are made for sharpening garden tools.

At $6 its an absolute winner!

The corners are a little sharp when you first get it, but if you round them slightly with some 600grit wet and dry its fantastic burnisher!

easily as good as the fancy french ones.

$6- home depot.

41BVS0NSOXL._SX425_.jpg

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24 minutes ago, finnfinnviolin said:

Hi everyone, Just wanted to show people these little carbide burnishers. I think they are made for sharpening garden tools.

At $6 its an absolute winner!

The corners are a little sharp when you first get it, but if you round them slightly with some 600grit wet and dry its fantastic burnisher!

easily as good as the fancy french ones.

$6- home depot.

41BVS0NSOXL._SX425_.jpg

Looks a bit like a box-cutter, or an abrasive sharpening tool. If it is actually a burnisher, how is it supposed to be used?

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I've seen those.  It's a kind of sharpener.  Not really a burnisher.  Only the little inset is truly hard.  And it is finely striated.

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Hi All

I use 4mm needle rollers saved from an u/s bearing in a piece of off-cut - maybe tone-wood maple.

1495488305_Vtools-scraperburnisher.jpg.fbe86ae7fb8b7679057a0a544e86c4c2.jpg

The exposed piece of roller is to begin the turnover by running it along the side of the scraper - then you turn the edge by running the edge of the scraper through the saw slit.

You don't need much pressure to turn the edge. I started off making like Samson - huge pressure and half-a-dozen swipes. My shavings weren't! Dust was!

Brian spotted me wasting energy and showed me that 2 passes with light pressure did the trick. Thanks Brian.

Good stuff needle rollers - they are around Rc 63 - plenty hard enough to turn scraper edges.

My party trick with cello end-pins is to chuck them in the lathe, face the end, drill a 1.5mm dia hole and insert a 1.5mm needle roller from a scrapped car propeller shaft universal joint. Retain it with some Loctite and then re-grind the end-pin to a point. Should be good for a century or so.

cheers edi

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4 minutes ago, edi malinaric said:

Hi All

I use 4mm needle rollers saved from an u/s bearing in a piece of off-cut - maybe tone-wood maple.

1495488305_Vtools-scraperburnisher.jpg.fbe86ae7fb8b7679057a0a544e86c4c2.jpg

The exposed piece of roller is to begin the turnover by running it along the side of the scraper - then you turn the edge by running the edge of the scraper through the saw slit.

You don't need much pressure to turn the edge. I started off making like Samson - huge pressure and half-a-dozen swipes. My shavings weren't! Dust was!

Brian spotted me wasting energy and showed me that 2 passes with light pressure did the trick. Thanks Brian.

Needle rollers are around Rc 63 - plenty hard enough to do the job.

My party trick with cello end-pins is to chuck them in the lathe, face the end, drill a 1.5mm dia hole and insert a 1.5mm needle roller from a scrapped car propeller shaft universal joint. Retain it with some Loctite and then re-grind the end-pin to a point. Should be good for a century or so.

cheers edi

Nice! 

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2 minutes ago, finnfinnviolin said:

how does it sound? 

Who is going to answer?

Not all at once!

:-)

D**n - you'd think that I would have learnt to check the unread posts before answering ;-(

Hi finnfinnviolin - makes a neat swiiishing as you turn the edge. No bass tho.

I really should sand and re-varnish the handle.

cheers edi

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2 hours ago, finnfinnviolin said:

are they Tungsten? or just very hard? 

Not tungsten just very hard. This one is a veteran of many burnishings. Got it for free!

20190424_171617.jpg

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I have a short 1/2" diameter mill that is a couple inches long.  Made of tungsten carbide.  It never galls or even gets marks from using as a burnisher.   I lubricate with a dry bar of soap,   which I think works a little bit better than parrafine.

They are not expensive,  but not free.  Worth a small price for a tool which will last forever.

And it has a mirror finish which encourages me that it will make a smooth burr.

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On 4/25/2019 at 4:21 AM, scordatura said:

Connecting rod from car engine.

Not wanting to be a nark, but do you really mean a con rod?  Gudgeon pin makes more sense and seems a good idea.

Regards,

Tim

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33 minutes ago, TimRobinson said:

Not wanting to be a nark, but do you really mean a con rod?  Gudgeon pin makes more sense and seems a good idea.

Regards,

Tim

I thought  that  too. Turns out it's a  pushrod. 

I use a polished triangular  file. 

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4 hours ago, Conor Russell said:

I thought  that  too. Turns out it's a  pushrod. 

I use a polished triangular  file. 

Yes a pushrod is the correct term.  Controls valve movement in an overhead valve engine.

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On 4/24/2019 at 3:07 PM, finnfinnviolin said:

how does it sound? 

:lol:

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8 hours ago, TimRobinson said:

Not wanting to be a nark, but do you really mean a con rod?  Gudgeon pin makes more sense and seems a good idea.

Regards,

Tim

A gudgeon or wrist pin as we call them could work; they are case hardened, but I think they are a little too short and large in diameter.

The shank from an old broken threading tap works well. Thread what's left of the threads into the end of a hardwood handle, after applying some epoxy on the threads to hold it fast.

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There seems to be some extra incentive to find something that's scrounged from a junk yard, but to me paying $3 - $5 to have something shipped to my mailbox is a better deal than spending time scrounging. 

And I don't see that carbide is necessary; HSS is plenty hard enough. 

I already have a burnisher, but if I wanted to make one cheaply, I'd get something like this.

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Hi All - why waste money?

The pressures involved aren't high - a 6" screwdriver does the job just fine.

The smaller the diameter the higher the contact stress - so lower pressure needed to turn the edge.

- the "draw-pin" from a 3/16" pop-rivet would be perfect for the job. It's harder than a drill (ever tried to drill one out ?)

Guess I'll have to make one and report back.

Having cut my left little finger to the bone while sharpening a scraper - please avoid using short stubby "wotsits"

cheers edi

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