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lpr5184

Guarneri 4 String Fiddle...

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25 minutes ago, Anthony Panke said:

Don’t know about strength but I would always follow the cut of the wood, ideally with an offcut from the neck block.

This was my first thought too and after a quick review of Matt Noykos article on "Resetting a Neck" this is the recommended procedure... Very helpful article...Thanks!

https://trianglestrings.com/resetting-neck-part-2/

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1 hour ago, lpr5184 said:

The neck that I'm re-using needs a 2mm rear shim added to make contact with the button...

Is it best to use a quarter sawn piece and orient the grain the same as the neck or use a slab sawn piece which orients the grain the opposite way? Which way is strongest? I'm sure this is common knowledge to those who do a lot of neck resets. 

Jerry gave a talk on this at the SVA.  You want to match the grain lines and orientation the same as the rest of the heel.  Too bad you probably don't have the off-cuts from when you made this scroll.

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21 hours ago, Jim Bress said:

Jerry gave a talk on this at the SVA.  You want to match the grain lines and orientation the same as the rest of the heel.  Too bad you probably don't have the off-cuts from when you made this scroll.

The cut off from this scroll is long gone but I have other neck blocks from the same batch which matched well. At the end though I only needed a 1mm shim. Just barely a grain line. If I remember this scroll was carved for a Rogeri model violin I made which had a narrower rib height at the top block. This fiddle is a little under 30mm at that point  which explains the need for a shim.

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E.   Are you copying a particular Guarneri?   If so, do you have a poster or CT scans that you're using as guide ?  

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2 minutes ago, MikeC said:

E.   Are you copying a particular Guarneri?   If so, do you have a poster or CT scans that you're using as guide ?  

I have the Vieuxtemps poster from The Strad that I used to create an outline for a new form. I'm not copying every measurement off the poster though. I'll have to check again but I think the arching of the Vieuxtemps is a little different than the Cannone.  I've had very good results with the Cannone's full arching so I hope this arching will work as well...fingers crossed.

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Neck is set, fiddle is now finished in the white. Time for some UV exposure.

A few shots while finishing the heel and button...

 

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1 hour ago, Anthony Panke said:

Cutting downwards is risky.

It sure can be!...scary sharp tools and small shavings help with control when making downward cuts.  I don't have three hands and had to use one hand to hold the camera but using two hands to control the chisel is critical. Good reminder though... Thanks!

Finally, the warmth of summer rays are back

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The sun disappeared for two days so I strung up the fiddle in the white to check for any frequency issues. I found none. Tone is strong and even.

Back in the sun today...

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On 5/22/2019 at 2:34 PM, lpr5184 said:

Neck is set, fiddle is now finished in the white. Time for some UV exposure.

A few shots while finishing the heel and button...

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I didn’t notice the purfling not crossing the button area earlier. I think this is very sensible. I haven’t had the guts to break tradition here yet. Looks good. 

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Perfect sunny day to get the ground and a coat of varnish on. The only bad thing was the cottonwood floating in the breeze. 

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Very nice work.  BTW, brushed or applied with fingers?

I'm selecting wood for my first violin that will be Gesu model as well (kinda love those f holes and c-bouts) I hope it will end up half decent playing fiddle. This thread feeds me with hope. :-)

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what kind of purfling is that?   The center looks red instead of the usual white.  

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For the ground on this one I sized with Davide Sora's casein sealer. Then brushed on a thin coat of my ground varnish (3:1 ratio) which consists of cooked strasbourg turp, burgundy and aleppo resins in linseed oil. Then one coat of Nunzio's amber oil varnish, brushed on and padded even with hand.

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7 minutes ago, MikeC said:

what kind of purfling is that?   The center looks red instead of the usual white.  

Purfling is from Karen Rost. The middle strip is pearwood.

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your ground oil varnish 3:1 ratio.  is that 3 rosin to 1 oil?   or 3 oil to 1 rosin?    I assume 3 rosin to 1 oil,  In that case it would be pretty thick wouldn't it?   Do you have to thin it down to apply it? 

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6 hours ago, MikeC said:

your ground oil varnish 3:1 ratio.  is that 3 rosin to 1 oil?   or 3 oil to 1 rosin?    I assume 3 rosin to 1 oil,  In that case it would be pretty thick wouldn't it?   Do you have to thin it down to apply it? 

Yes it's thinned down with Diamond G turpentine.

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Looks impressive. A cello stand and a guitar stand?

mine is just a block of wood with a hole for the endpin, and 2 large clamps attached for stability. These lie on the ground and you can position the instrument at almost any angles. 

How many coats of varnish is that now? Any pigments added?

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2 hours ago, Anthony Panke said:

Looks impressive. A cello stand and a guitar stand?

mine is just a block of wood with a hole for the endpin, and 2 large clamps attached for stability. These lie on the ground and you can position the instrument at almost any angles. 

How many coats of varnish is that now? Any pigments added?

The stands are made by the Engles company...one cello and one violin. This is coat four. No added pigments. My colophony varnish mixed with Nunzio's red madder and brown rosinate varnishes.

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