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nathan slobodkin

Tortelier cello endplns

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Stahlhammer are basically the same Thing, but they aren't what they used to be. Now they are made with carbon fibre rods, which may or may not sound as good as the old model. 

There are definite Advantages to this type of end pin. Personally, what I liked a lot when using it was that, because the pivoting point is closer to the Player, there is less weight on the chest of the Player than with a conventional end pin. I also liked the increased stability, as the pin is not so much prone to bouncing. So generally it makes playing the cello feel a lot easier, and as you know, such psychological Things can make a huge difference. I'm not a tall guy, but for tall People the effect will be even bigger. I do not currently own such a pin, but am contemplating installing one on my cello.

I've heard good Things About the berlin sound-pin-system (google it, they have a german language site), but have not yet tried it out. It is very expensive but also has very convincing list of proponents. I do own their pin (the rod only) and use it wit a standard Bender bung, it is one of the best sounding Pins for my cello.

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20 hours ago, nathan slobodkin said:

Why some one wants one?

I think bent endpins help when a cellist plays with the cello in a fairly flat position, for the reasons baroquecello mentioned. I had a teacher who tried to tell me that you had to play a cello in such a position because the weight of the bow is coming down on the strings that way, but I think that is bunk. Some of my favorite cellist played in a very vertical position, and IIRC Rostropovich played in the flat position so that he could hear himself better. 

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12 hours ago, glebert said:

Some of my favorite cellist played in a very vertical position, and IIRC Rostropovich played in the flat position so that he could hear himself better. 

I once knew a pro cellist who claimed, however speciously, that the cello sounded louder that way. Apparently it didn't occur to him that just because the cello sounded louder to HIM didn't necessarily mean it sounded louder to the AUDIENCE (hint: it didn't...) Some others say it makes playing the cello more comfortable. Someone claims it relieves pressure on the chest.

Whatever.

Theories abound, but keep in mind no one well-known ever played with a bent endpin pre-Rostropovich. And just because you're probably wondering, a bent pin and a Rostropovich technique are, like, totally unrelated.

Caveat emptor

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On 3/27/2019 at 4:15 PM, baroquecello said:

............'..............a standard Bender bung............

But wasn't Bender nonstandard to begin with? :huh:;)

image.png.e1b4656498dd37c7189f8716a4d53aee.png

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One reason some people like an angled endpin is that it makes the cello less likely to rotate around what would normally be the axis of the endpin, when played. With the angled enpin, the cello cannot rotate without also moving side-to-side.

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On 3/28/2019 at 7:36 AM, glebert said:

I think bent endpins help when a cellist plays with the cello in a fairly flat position, for the reasons baroquecello mentioned. I had a teacher who tried to tell me that you had to play a cello in such a position because the weight of the bow is coming down on the strings that way, but I think that is bunk. Some of my favorite cellist played in a very vertical position, and IIRC Rostropovich played in the flat position so that he could hear himself better. 

A cellist here in Seattle who was good friends with Rostropovich told me that he made the joke with him, "Slava, you always wanted to play the piano. You are amost there!"

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2 hours ago, duane88 said:

A cellist here in Seattle who was good friends with Rostropovich told me that he made the joke with him, "Slava, you always wanted to play the piano. You are amost there!"

LOL

It is funny, watching video of Rostropovich play he always looks like he would be stern and grumpy, but seeing videos of him talking to others he was quite warm. 

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17 hours ago, AtlVcl said:

- snip -

Theories abound, but keep in mind no one well-known ever played with a bent endpin pre-Rostropovich.

- snip -

 

Tortelier wasn't well known? He was often my "go to" reference.

cheers edi

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On 3/29/2019 at 4:01 PM, glebert said:

LOL

It is funny, watching video of Rostropovich play he always looks like he would be stern and grumpy, but seeing videos of him talking to others he was quite warm. 

 

Yes, indeed. Mr. Rostropovich was most especially "quite warm" with attractive young women.

On 3/29/2019 at 4:14 PM, edi malinaric said:

Tortelier wasn't well known? He was often my "go to" reference.

cheers edi

For neurotic wordsmiths, Tortelier was indeed one of several well-known cellists of  the 20th. century. He happened to become associated with a unique endpin which was named after him because ...[spoiler alert]...HE WAS THE FIRST!

It was Rostropovich's success that encouraged many cellists to try it out, myself included (briefly). During the Cold War there existed a certain artistic romance (for lack of a better phrase) in all things Russian, the "Russian system", the "Russian bow hold", Russian participation and success in world-wide competitions, and certainly the success of the majority of the world's "name brand" violinists. In addition, I think it's interesting that he was appointed Music Director of the National (U.S.) Symphony Orchestra before the fall of the Berlin Wall, an appointment that can be accepted on purely musical terms by only the most narrow-minded and dense of the hoi polloi.

(As an interesting side note: my band played Beethoven 9 in East Berlin in 1988. The Fall of the Berlin Wall was almost exactly 3 years later, thus illustrating the healing power of music. Hey, it's a fact! You could look it up!)

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10 hours ago, AtlVcl said:

During the Cold War there existed a certain artistic romance (for lack of a better phrase) in all things Russian, the "Russian system", the "Russian bow hold",

Stockholm syndrome.  I wanted my Cub Scout troop to become Young Pioneers.

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