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viola_license_revoked

Fiddle fix - amateur edition

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Caution: amateur content.

Greetings to all

I acquired a fine fiddle from the dumpster the other day and I'm going to try and fix it.

If you'd like to comment or offer any advice, I would really appreciate it.

I present my latest acquisition: "Viola". Named after an ex I wouldn't mind finding in a dumpster.

I'm keeping vampire hours again and will probably pull the top to have a look-see before sunup

Many thanks and appreciation in advance!

Ray

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My first thought is to put it back in the dumpster. So many things wrong with it that need a skilled luthier, a lot of time, and a fair amount of money(even if you do it it yourself).

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1 hour ago, FiddleDoug said:

My first thought is to put it back in the dumpster. So many things wrong with it that need a skilled luthier, a lot of time, and a fair amount of money(even if you do it it yourself).

I know... I know... I'll try to do it on the cheap. Can't do anything about the skill part tho... Thank you for heads up!

9 minutes ago, jacobsaunders said:

You should go back to the dumpster, and look if the scroll is still there somewhere. Otherwise a 19thC Saxon fiddle in need of extensive repair.

Should have dove deeper into that dumpster... But it's really cool to be the first time owner of a Saxon something. Thank you kindly sir.

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6 hours ago, viola_license_revoked said:

 

I present my latest acquisition: "Viola". Named after an ex I wouldn't mind finding in a dumpster.

Gives insight into your Avatar.

1 hour ago, viola_license_revoked said:

I need to come up with a game plan

The “Game Plan” of any restoration I have anything to do with, starts with cleaning all the old glue, crap and dirt off. I normally do this by choosing a small area and putting damp kitchen roll on it for ten minutes (there is a world of difference between “damp” and “wet”), then scrubbing it clean with a short haired brush If you do it in small areas, one at a time, you don’t risk everything warping to a different shape. Once everything is clean, one has a much better oversight of what needs to be done. Also, when working on it over the next weeks, one doesn’t have the constant feeling that one should go and get a tetanus jab.

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3 hours ago, jacobsaunders said:

Gives insight into your Avatar.

The “Game Plan” of any restoration I have anything to do with, starts with cleaning all the old glue, crap and dirt off. I normally do this by choosing a small area and putting damp kitchen roll on it for ten minutes (there is a world of difference between “damp” and “wet”), then scrubbing it clean with a short haired brush If you do it in small areas, one at a time, you don’t risk everything warping to a different shape. Once everything is clean, one has a much better oversight of what needs to be done. Also, when working on it over the next weeks, one doesn’t have the constant feeling that one should go and get a tetanus jab.

Understood. 

It'll take a while to get thru the stiff hide glue and some other stuff that won't dissolve or soften in alcohol or acetone. Haven't tried vinegar. But can confirm a hot knife will work as a last resort.

I'll have some progress to show hopefully by next weekend

Thank you kindly

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48 minutes ago, viola_license_revoked said:

 

It'll take a while to get thru the stiff hide glue and some other stuff that won't dissolve or soften in alcohol or acetone. 

Try water (and patience)

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As Jacob says, water and time. You can take tiny pieces of  rolled paper towel and dampen them and place them on areas to help keep them wet, but not too much water...

this is quite an undertaking and will test your PATIENCE which is the key word and which is why if this was to be repaired at a shop it would cost a fortune. There is well over a 100 hours of labor needed imo, so take even the lowest shop rate and you'll see that if you are successful, you will have the "Steve Austin" {which should be the name on the label} 6,000,000 dollar violin, man

Good luck, keep us posted, nice to see you at it again.

 

ps, love those tacks in the block :lol:

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2 hours ago, jezzupe said:

As Jacob says, water and time. You can take tiny pieces of  rolled paper towel and dampen them and place them on areas to help keep them wet, but not too much water...

this is quite an undertaking and will test your PATIENCE which is the key word and which is why if this was to be repaired at a shop it would cost a fortune. There is well over a 100 hours of labor needed imo, so take even the lowest shop rate and you'll see that if you are successful, you will have the "Steve Austin" {which should be the name on the label} 6,000,000 dollar violin, man

Good luck, keep us posted, nice to see you at it again.

 

ps, love those tacks in the block :lol:

Yeah Jess I'm back at it again! Thank you so much for the advice and encouragement!

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5 hours ago, Nick Allen said:

I can see that the fingerboard was glued on with gorilla glue. Have fun getting that off. 

It was ok

Once I got the tiny gorillas inside the glue to stop holding hands, the fingerboard was much easier to remove

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7 minutes ago, violguy said:

My Gawd Sir! You may have discovered the missing Ex Abercrombie Strad! <G>

Hmmm... What if it was rihno glue instead?

 

Anyway I got to spend a couple of hours cleaning the top as advised. I think two hours is max for me just in case I get the top too damp... I used paper towel, q-tips, water, and lots of patience. Just as wiser people have told me.

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There's a fissure along in the center seam. Likely compromised joinery  from when it was made. I would really like to avoid a finger patch. What should I do, ignore it? I mean it's been fine for 100 years...

What would y'all do?

Thank you!

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29 minutes ago, viola_license_revoked said:

It was ok

Once I got the tiny gorillas inside the glue to stop holding hands, the fingerboard was much easier to remove

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LOL!

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